%%% -*-BibTeX-*-
%%% ====================================================================
%%% BibTeX-file{
%%%     author          = "Nelson H. F. Beebe",
%%%     version         = "1.13",
%%%     date            = "08 July 2014",
%%%     time            = "16:06:33 MDT",
%%%     filename        = "taas.bib",
%%%     address         = "University of Utah
%%%                        Department of Mathematics, 110 LCB
%%%                        155 S 1400 E RM 233
%%%                        Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0090
%%%                        USA",
%%%     telephone       = "+1 801 581 5254",
%%%     FAX             = "+1 801 581 4148",
%%%     URL             = "http://www.math.utah.edu/~beebe",
%%%     checksum        = "16120 8244 43322 420160",
%%%     email           = "beebe at math.utah.edu, beebe at acm.org,
%%%                        beebe at computer.org (Internet)",
%%%     codetable       = "ISO/ASCII",
%%%     keywords        = "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive
%%%                        Systems (TAAS); bibliography; TAAS",
%%%     license         = "public domain",
%%%     supported       = "yes",
%%%     docstring       = "This is a COMPLETE BibTeX bibliography for
%%%                        ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive
%%%                        Systems (TAAS) (CODEN ????, ISSN 1556-4665),
%%%                        covering all journal issues from 2006 --
%%%                        date.
%%%
%%%                        At version 1.13, the COMPLETE journal
%%%                        coverage looked like this:
%%%
%%%                             2006 (  11)    2009 (  25)    2012 (  39)
%%%                             2007 (  17)    2010 (  16)    2013 (  15)
%%%                             2008 (  21)    2011 (  29)    2014 (  16)
%%%
%%%                             Article:        189
%%%
%%%                             Total entries:  189
%%%
%%%                        The journal Web page can be found at:
%%%
%%%                            http://www.acm.org/pubs/taas.html
%%%
%%%                        The journal table of contents page is at:
%%%
%%%                            http://www.acm.org/taas/
%%%                            http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010
%%%
%%%                        Qualified subscribers can retrieve the full
%%%                        text of recent articles in PDF form.
%%%
%%%                        The initial draft was extracted from the ACM
%%%                        Web pages.
%%%
%%%                        ACM copyrights explicitly permit abstracting
%%%                        with credit, so article abstracts, keywords,
%%%                        and subject classifications have been
%%%                        included in this bibliography wherever
%%%                        available.  Article reviews have been
%%%                        omitted, until their copyright status has
%%%                        been clarified.
%%%
%%%                        bibsource keys in the bibliography entries
%%%                        below indicate the entry originally came
%%%                        from the computer science bibliography
%%%                        archive, even though it has likely since
%%%                        been corrected and updated.
%%%
%%%                        URL keys in the bibliography point to
%%%                        World Wide Web locations of additional
%%%                        information about the entry.
%%%
%%%                        BibTeX citation tags are uniformly chosen
%%%                        as name:year:abbrev, where name is the
%%%                        family name of the first author or editor,
%%%                        year is a 4-digit number, and abbrev is a
%%%                        3-letter condensation of important title
%%%                        words. Citation tags were automatically
%%%                        generated by software developed for the
%%%                        BibNet Project.
%%%
%%%                        In this bibliography, entries are sorted in
%%%                        publication order, using ``bibsort -byvolume.''
%%%
%%%                        The checksum field above contains a CRC-16
%%%                        checksum as the first value, followed by the
%%%                        equivalent of the standard UNIX wc (word
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%%%                        Solovay's checksum utility."
%%%     }
%%% ====================================================================

@Preamble{"\input bibnames.sty" #
    "\def \TM {${}^{\sc TM}$}"
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%%% ====================================================================
%%% Acknowledgement abbreviations:

@String{ack-nhfb = "Nelson H. F. Beebe,
                    University of Utah,
                    Department of Mathematics, 110 LCB,
                    155 S 1400 E RM 233,
                    Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0090, USA,
                    Tel: +1 801 581 5254,
                    FAX: +1 801 581 4148,
                    e-mail: \path|beebe@math.utah.edu|,
                            \path|beebe@acm.org|,
                            \path|beebe@computer.org| (Internet),
                    URL: \path|http://www.math.utah.edu/~beebe/|"}

%%% ====================================================================
%%% Journal abbreviations:

@String{j-TAAS                  = "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and
                                  Adaptive Systems (TAAS)"}

%%% ====================================================================
%%% Bibliography entries:

@Article{Serugendo:2006:I,
  author =       "Giovanna Di Marzo Serugendo",
  title =        "Introduction",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "1--3",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2006",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1152934.1152935",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Fri Apr 24 17:33:22 MDT 2009",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Labella:2006:DLG,
  author =       "Thomas H. Labella and Marco Dorigo and Jean-Louis
                 Deneubourg",
  title =        "Division of labor in a group of robots inspired by
                 ants' foraging behavior",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "4--25",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2006",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1152934.1152936",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Fri Apr 24 17:33:22 MDT 2009",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "In this article, we analyze the behavior of a group of
                 robots involved in an object retrieval task. The
                 robots' control system is inspired by a model of ants'
                 foraging. This model emphasizes the role of learning in
                 the individual. Individuals adapt to the environment
                 using only locally available information. We show that
                 a simple parameter adaptation is an effective way to
                 improve the efficiency of the group and that it brings
                 forth division of labor between the members of the
                 group. Moreover, robots that are best at retrieving
                 have a higher probability of becoming active
                 retrievers. This selection of the best members does not
                 use any explicit representation of individual
                 capabilities. We analyze this system and point out its
                 strengths and its weaknesses.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
  keywords =     "adaptation; adaptive systems; ant algorithms;
                 bio-inspired systems",
}

@Article{Babaoglu:2006:DPB,
  author =       "Ozalp Babaoglu and Geoffrey Canright and Andreas
                 Deutsch and Gianni A. Di Caro and Frederick Ducatelle
                 and Luca M. Gambardella and Niloy Ganguly and M{\'a}rk
                 Jelasity and Roberto Montemanni and Alberto Montresor
                 and Tore Urnes",
  title =        "Design patterns from biology for distributed
                 computing",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "26--66",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2006",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1152934.1152937",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Fri Apr 24 17:33:22 MDT 2009",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "Recent developments in information technology have
                 brought about important changes in distributed
                 computing. New environments such as massively
                 large-scale, wide-area computer networks and mobile ad
                 hoc networks have emerged. Common characteristics of
                 these environments include extreme dynamicity,
                 unreliability, and large scale. Traditional approaches
                 to designing distributed applications in these
                 environments based on central control, small scale, or
                 strong reliability assumptions are not suitable for
                 exploiting their enormous potential. Based on the
                 observation that living organisms can effectively
                 organize large numbers of unreliable and
                 dynamically-changing components (cells, molecules,
                 individuals, etc.) into robust and adaptive structures,
                 it has long been a research challenge to characterize
                 the key ideas and mechanisms that make biological
                 systems work and to apply them to distributed systems
                 engineering. In this article we propose a conceptual
                 framework that captures several basic biological
                 processes in the form of a family of design patterns.
                 Examples include plain diffusion, replication,
                 chemotaxis, and stigmergy. We show through examples how
                 to implement important functions for distributed
                 computing based on these patterns. Using a common
                 evaluation methodology, we show that our bio-inspired
                 solutions have performance comparable to traditional,
                 state-of-the-art solutions while they inherit desirable
                 properties of biological systems including adaptivity
                 and robustness.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
  keywords =     "ad-hoc networks; bio-inspiration; distributed design
                 patterns; peer-to-peer; self-&ast",
}

@Article{Mena:2006:SRS,
  author =       "Eduardo Mena and Arantza Illarramendi and Jose A. Royo
                 and Alfredo Go{\~n}I",
  title =        "A software retrieval service based on adaptive
                 knowledge-driven agents for wireless environments",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "67--90",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2006",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1152934.1152938",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Fri Apr 24 17:33:22 MDT 2009",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "The ability to retrieve software in an easy and
                 efficient way confers competitive advantage on computer
                 users in general and, even more especially, on users of
                 wireless devices (like some laptops, PDAs, etc.). In
                 this article, we present a software retrieval service
                 that allows users to select and retrieve software in an
                 easy and efficient way, anywhere and anytime. Two
                 relevant components of this service are: (1) a software
                 ontology (software catalog) which provides users with a
                 semantic description of software elements, hiding the
                 location and access method of various software
                 repositories, and (2) a set of specialist agents that
                 allow browsing of the software catalog (automatically
                 customized for each user), and an efficient retrieval
                 method for the selected software. These agents
                 automatically adapt their behavior to different users
                 and situations by considering the profile and
                 preferences of the users and the network status. In
                 summary, our software-obtaining process based on an
                 ontology and autonomous and adaptive agents presents a
                 qualitative advance with respect to existing solutions:
                 our approach adapts to the features of users, relieving
                 them from knowing the technical features of their
                 devices and the location and access method of various
                 remote software repositories.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
  keywords =     "adaptive multiagent systems; pervasive and mobile
                 computing; Software retrieval",
}

@Article{Khan:2006:AFE,
  author =       "Masood Mehmood Khan and Michael Ingleby and Robert D.
                 Ward",
  title =        "Automated Facial Expression Classification and affect
                 interpretation using infrared measurement of facial
                 skin temperature variations",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "91--113",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2006",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1152934.1152939",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Fri Apr 24 17:33:22 MDT 2009",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "Machines would require the ability to perceive and
                 adapt to affects for achieving artificial sociability.
                 Most autonomous systems use Automated Facial Expression
                 Classification (AFEC) and Automated Affect
                 Interpretation (AAI) to achieve sociability. Varying
                 lighting conditions, occlusion, and control over
                 physiognomy can influence the real life performance of
                 vision-based AFEC systems. Physiological signals
                 provide complementary information for AFEC and AAI. We
                 employed transient facial thermal features for AFEC and
                 AAI. Infrared thermal images with participants' normal
                 expression and intentional expressions of happiness,
                 sadness, disgust, and fear were captured. Facial points
                 that undergo significant thermal changes with a change
                 in expression termed as Facial Thermal Feature Points
                 (FTFPs) were identified. Discriminant analysis was
                 invoked on principal components derived from the
                 Thermal Intensity Values (TIVs) recorded at the FTFPs.
                 The cross-validation and person-independent
                 classification respectively resulted in 66.28\% and
                 56.0\% success rates. Classification significance tests
                 suggest that (1) like other physiological cues, facial
                 skin temperature also provides useful information about
                 affective states and their facial expression; (2)
                 patterns of facial skin temperature variation can
                 complement other cues for AFEC and AAI; and (3)
                 infrared thermal imaging may help achieve artificial
                 sociability in robots and autonomous systems.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
  keywords =     "Automated affect recognition; facial expression
                 classification; infrared thermal imaging; socially
                 intelligent machines",
}

@Article{TAAS-Staff:2006:R,
  author =       "{ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 staff}",
  title =        "Reviewers",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "114--114",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2006",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1152934.1152940",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Fri Apr 24 17:33:22 MDT 2009",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Tuci:2006:CTS,
  author =       "Elio Tuci and Roderich Gro{\ss} and Vito Trianni and
                 Francesco Mondada and Michael Bonani and Marco Dorigo",
  title =        "Cooperation through self-assembly in multi-robot
                 systems",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "115--150",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2006",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1186778.1186779",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Fri Apr 24 17:33:40 MDT 2009",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "This article illustrates the methods and results of
                 two sets of experiments in which a group of mobile
                 robots, called {\em s-bots}, are required to physically
                 connect to each other, that is, to self-assemble, to
                 cope with environmental conditions that prevent them
                 from carrying out their task individually. The first
                 set of experiments is a pioneering study on the utility
                 of self-assembling robots to address relatively complex
                 scenarios, such as cooperative object transport. The
                 results of our work suggest that the s-bots possess
                 hardware characteristics which facilitate the design of
                 control mechanisms for autonomous self-assembly. The
                 control architecture we developed proved particularly
                 successful in guiding the robots engaged in the
                 cooperative transport task. However, the results also
                 showed that some features of the robots' controllers
                 had a disruptive effect on their performances. The
                 second set of experiments is an attempt to enhance the
                 adaptiveness of our multi-robot system. In particular,
                 we aim to synthesise an integrated (i.e., not-modular)
                 decision-making mechanism which allows the s-bot to
                 autonomously decide whether or not environmental
                 contingencies require self-assembly. The results show
                 that it is possible to synthesize, by using
                 evolutionary computation techniques, artificial neural
                 networks that integrate both the mechanisms for
                 sensory-motor coordination and for decision making
                 required by the robots in the context of
                 self-assembly.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
  keywords =     "artificial neural networks; evolutionary algorithms;
                 evolutionary robotics; self-assembly; swarm
                 intelligence; Swarm robotics",
}

@Article{Soundararajan:2006:RPB,
  author =       "Gokul Soundararajan and Cristiana Amza",
  title =        "Reactive provisioning of backend databases in shared
                 dynamic content server clusters",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "151--188",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2006",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1186778.1186780",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Fri Apr 24 17:33:40 MDT 2009",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "This paper introduces a self-configuring architecture
                 for on-demand resource allocation to applications in a
                 shared database cluster. We use a unified approach to
                 load and fault management based on data replication and
                 reactive replica provisioning. While data replication
                 provides scaling and high availability, reactive
                 provisioning dynamically allocates additional replicas
                 to applications in response to peak loads or failure
                 conditions, thus providing per application performance.
                 We design an efficient method for data migration when
                 joining a new replica to a running application that
                 allows for the quick addition of replicas with minimal
                 disruption of transaction processing. Furthermore, by
                 augmenting the adaptation feedback loop with awareness
                 of the delay introduced by the data migration process
                 in our replicated system, we avoid oscillations in
                 resource allocation. We investigate our transparent
                 database provisioning mechanisms in the context of
                 multitier dynamic content Web servers. We dynamically
                 expand/contract the respective allocations within the
                 database tier for two different applications, the TPC-W
                 e-commerce benchmark and the RUBIS online auction
                 benchmark. We demonstrate that our techniques provide
                 quality of service under different load and failure
                 scenarios.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
  keywords =     "Autonomic systems; databases; query processing;
                 transactions",
}

@Article{Gechter:2006:RAB,
  author =       "Franck Gechter and Vincent Chevrier and Fran{\c{c}}ois
                 Charpillet",
  title =        "A reactive agent-based problem-solving model:
                 Application to localization and tracking",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "189--222",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2006",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1186778.1186781",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Fri Apr 24 17:33:40 MDT 2009",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "For two decades, multi-agent systems have been an
                 attractive approach for problem solving and have been
                 applied to a wide range of applications. Despite the
                 lack of generic methodology, the reactive approach is
                 interesting considering the properties it provides.
                 This article presents a problem-solving model based on
                 a swarm approach where agents interact using
                 physics-inspired mechanisms. The initial problem and
                 its constraints are represented through agents'
                 environment, the dynamics of which is part of the
                 problem-solving process. This model is then applied to
                 localization and target tracking. Experiments assess
                 our approach and compare it to widely-used classical
                 algorithms.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
  keywords =     "localization; mobile robots; reactive multi-agent
                 systems; tracking",
}

@Article{Dobson:2006:SAC,
  author =       "Simon Dobson and Spyros Denazis and Antonio
                 Fern{\'a}ndez and Dominique Ga{\"\i}ti and Erol Gelenbe
                 and Fabio Massacci and Paddy Nixon and Fabrice Saffre
                 and Nikita Schmidt and Franco Zambonelli",
  title =        "A survey of autonomic communications",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "223--259",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2006",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1186778.1186782",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Fri Apr 24 17:33:40 MDT 2009",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "Autonomic communications seek to improve the ability
                 of network and services to cope with unpredicted
                 change, including changes in topology, load, task, the
                 physical and logical characteristics of the networks
                 that can be accessed, and so forth. Broad-ranging
                 autonomic solutions require designers to account for a
                 range of end-to-end issues affecting programming
                 models, network and contextual modeling and reasoning,
                 decentralised algorithms, trust acquisition and
                 maintenance---issues whose solutions may draw on
                 approaches and results from a surprisingly broad range
                 of disciplines. We survey the current state of
                 autonomic communications research and identify
                 significant emerging trends and techniques.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
  keywords =     "Autonomic communication",
}

@Article{Anonymous:2006:R,
  author =       "Anonymous",
  title =        "Reviewers",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "260--261",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2006",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1186778.1186783",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Fri Apr 24 17:33:40 MDT 2009",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Biskupski:2007:PMS,
  author =       "Bartosz Biskupski and Jim Dowling and Jan Sacha",
  title =        "Properties and mechanisms of self-organizing {MANET}
                 and {P2P} systems",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "2",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "1:1--1:??",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2007",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1216895.1216896",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Fri Apr 24 17:34:02 MDT 2009",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "Despite the recent appearance of self-organizing
                 distributed systems for Mobile Ad Hoc Networks (MANETs)
                 and Peer-to-Peer (P2P) networks, specific theoretical
                 aspects of both their properties and the mechanisms
                 used to establish those properties have been largely
                 overlooked. This has left many researchers confused as
                 to what constitutes a self-organizing distributed
                 system and without a vocabulary with which to discuss
                 aspects of these systems. This article introduces an
                 agent-based model of self-organizing MANET and P2P
                 systems and shows how it is realised in three existing
                 network systems. The model is based on concepts such as
                 partial views, evaluation functions, system utility,
                 feedback and decay. We review the three network
                 systems, AntHocNet, SAMPLE, and Freenet, and show how
                 they can achieve high scalability, robustness and
                 adaptability to unpredictable changes in their
                 environment, by using self-organizing mechanisms
                 similar to those found in nature. They are designed to
                 improve their operation in a dynamic, heterogeneous
                 environment, enabling them to often demonstrate
                 superior performance to state of the art distributed
                 systems. This article is also addressed at researchers
                 interested in gaining a general understanding of
                 different mechanisms and properties of
                 self-organization in distributed systems.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "1",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
  keywords =     "Adaptive systems; complex systems; MANET;
                 peer-to-peer; self-organization",
}

@Article{Kolan:2007:STD,
  author =       "Prakash Kolan and Ram Dantu",
  title =        "Socio-technical defense against voice spamming",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "2",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "2:1--2:??",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2007",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1216895.1216897",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Fri Apr 24 17:34:02 MDT 2009",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "Voice over IP (VoIP) is a key enabling technology for
                 migration of circuit-switched PSTN (Public Switched
                 Telephone Network) architectures to packet-based
                 networks. One problem of the present VoIP networks is
                 filtering spam calls referred to as SPIT (Spam over
                 Internet Telephony). Unlike spam in e-mail systems,
                 VoIP spam calls have to be identified in real time.
                 Many of the techniques devised for e-mail spam
                 detection rely upon content analysis, and in the case
                 of VoIP, it is too late to analyze the content (voice)
                 as the user would have already attended the call.
                 Therefore, the real challenge is to block a spam call
                 before the telephone rings. In addition, we believe it
                 is imperative that spam filters integrate human
                 behavioral aspects to gauge the legitimacy of voice
                 calls. We know that, when it comes to receiving or
                 rejecting a voice call, people use the social meaning
                 of trust, reputation, friendship of the calling party
                 and their own mood. In this article, we describe a
                 multi-stage, adaptive spam filter based on presence
                 (location, mood, time), trust, and reputation to detect
                 spam in voice calls. In particular, we describe a
                 closed-loop feedback control between different stages
                 to decide whether an incoming call is spam. We further
                 propose formalism for voice-specific trust and
                 reputation analysis. We base this formal model on a
                 human intuitive behavior for detecting spam based on
                 the called party's direct and indirect relationships
                 with the calling party. No VoIP corpus is available for
                 testing the detection mechanism. Therefore, for
                 verifying the detection accuracy, we used a laboratory
                 setup of several soft-phones, real IP phones and a
                 commercial-grade proxy server that receives and
                 processes incoming calls. We experimentally validated
                 the proposed filtering mechanisms by simulating spam
                 calls and measured the filter's accuracy by applying
                 the trust and reputation formalism. We observed that,
                 while the filter blocks a second spam call from a
                 spammer calling from the same end IP host and domain,
                 the filter needs only a maximum of three calls---even
                 in the case when spammer moves to a new host and
                 domain. Finally, we present a detailed sensitivity
                 analysis for examining the influence of parameters such
                 as spam volume and network size on the filter's
                 accuracy.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "2",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
  keywords =     "behavior; reputation; SIP (Session Initiation
                 Protocol); SPIT (Spam over IP Telephony); tolerance;
                 Trust",
}

@Article{Litoiu:2007:PAM,
  author =       "Marin Litoiu",
  title =        "A performance analysis method for autonomic computing
                 systems",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "2",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "3:1--3:??",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2007",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1216895.1216898",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Fri Apr 24 17:34:02 MDT 2009",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "In an {\em autonomic computing\/} system, an autonomic
                 manager makes tuning, load balancing, or provisioning
                 decisions based on a predictive model of the system.
                 This article investigates performance analysis
                 techniques used by the autonomic manager. It looks at
                 the complexity of the workloads and presents algorithms
                 for computing the bounds of performance metrics for
                 distributed systems under {\em asymptotic\/} and {\em
                 nonasymptotic\/} conditions, that is, with saturated
                 and nonsaturated resources. The techniques used are
                 hybrid in nature, making use of performance evaluation
                 and linear and nonlinear programming models. The
                 workloads are characterized by the {\em workload
                 intensity}, which represents the total number of users
                 in the system, and by the {\em workload mixes}, which
                 depict the number of users in each class of service.
                 The results presented in this article can be applied to
                 distributed transactional systems. Such systems serve a
                 large number of users with many classes of services and
                 can thus be considered as representative of a large
                 class of autonomic computing systems.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "3",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
  keywords =     "autonomic computing; performance models;
                 Self-management",
}

@Article{Mamei:2007:PPB,
  author =       "Marco Mamei and Franco Zambonelli",
  title =        "Pervasive pheromone-based interaction with {RFID}
                 tags",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "2",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "4:1--4:??",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2007",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1242060.1242061",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Fri Apr 24 17:34:13 MDT 2009",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "Despite the growing interest in pheromone-based
                 interaction to enforce adaptive and context-aware
                 coordination, the number of deployed systems exploiting
                 digital pheromones to coordinate the activities of
                 situated autonomous agents is still very limited. In
                 this article, we present a simple low-cost and
                 general-purpose implementation of a pheromone-based
                 interaction mechanism for pervasive environments. This
                 is realized by making use of RFID tags to store digital
                 pheromones and by having humans or robots spread/sense
                 pheromones by properly writing/reading RFID tags
                 populating the surrounding physical environment. We
                 exemplify and evaluate the effectiveness of our
                 approach via an application for object-tracking. This
                 application allows robots and humans to find
                 forgotten-somewhere objects by following pheromones
                 trails associated with them. In addition, we sketch
                 further potential applications of our approach in
                 pervasive computing scenarios, discuss related work in
                 the area, and identify future research directions.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "4",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
  keywords =     "pervasive computing; RFID tags; stigmergy",
}

@Article{Johnson:2007:MHD,
  author =       "Jeffrey H. Johnson and Pejman Iravani",
  title =        "The multilevel hypernetwork dynamics of complex
                 systems of robot soccer agents",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "2",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "5:1--5:??",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2007",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1242060.1242062",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Fri Apr 24 17:34:13 MDT 2009",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "A mathematical formalism is sketched for representing
                 relational structure between agents. {\em n\/} -ary
                 relations, {\em n\/} > 2, require hypernetworks, which
                 generalize binary relation networks. {\em n\/} -ary
                 relations on sets create structure at higher levels of
                 representation to the elements in multilevel systems.
                 The {\em state\/} of a system is represented by its
                 multilevel relational structure. The {\em dynamics\/}
                 of a system are represented by state changes through
                 time. These can be continuous with no change in the
                 hypernetwork topology, but often they are not.
                 Controlling such systems involves taking actions
                 intended to result in desirable state changes. The
                 concept of multilevel hypernetwork can be applied to
                 multiagent systems in general.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "5",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
  keywords =     "agent; complex systems; hypernetwork; multiagent
                 systems; multilevel representations; multilevel
                 systems; Q-analysis; robot soccer; robotics; simulated
                 multiagent football",
}

@Article{Chen:2007:ASN,
  author =       "Jinjun Chen and Yun Yang",
  title =        "Adaptive selection of necessary and sufficient
                 checkpoints for dynamic verification of temporal
                 constraints in grid workflow systems",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "2",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "6:1--6:??",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2007",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1242060.1242063",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Fri Apr 24 17:34:13 MDT 2009",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "In grid workflow systems, a checkpoint selection
                 strategy is responsible for selecting checkpoints for
                 conducting temporal verification at the runtime
                 execution stage. Existing representative checkpoint
                 selection strategies often select some unnecessary
                 checkpoints and omit some necessary ones because they
                 cannot adapt to the dynamics and uncertainty of runtime
                 activity completion duration. In this article, based on
                 the dynamics and uncertainty of runtime activity
                 completion duration, we develop a novel checkpoint
                 selection strategy that can adaptively select not only
                 necessary, but also sufficient checkpoints.
                 Specifically, we introduce a new concept of minimum
                 time redundancy as a key reference parameter for
                 checkpoint selection. An important feature of minimum
                 time redundancy is that it can adapt to the dynamics
                 and uncertainty of runtime activity completion
                 duration. We develop a method on how to achieve minimum
                 time redundancy dynamically along grid workflow
                 execution and investigate its relationships with
                 temporal consistency. Based on the method and the
                 relationships, we present our strategy and rigorously
                 prove its necessity and sufficiency. The simulation
                 evaluation further demonstrates experimentally such
                 necessity and sufficiency and its significant
                 improvement on checkpoint selection over other
                 representative strategies.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "6",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
  keywords =     "adaptive checkpoint selection; Grid workflows;
                 temporal constraints; temporal verification",
}

@Article{Tsai:2007:ISI,
  author =       "Jeffrey J. P. Tsai and Mukesh Singhal",
  title =        "Introduction: Special issue of the {IEEE SUTC'06}",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "2",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "7:1--7:??",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2007",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1278460.1278461",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Fri Apr 24 17:34:20 MDT 2009",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "7",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Herbert:2007:ACM,
  author =       "Douglas Herbert and Vinaitheerthan Sundaram and
                 Yung-Hsiang Lu and Saurabh Bagchi and Zhiyuan Li",
  title =        "Adaptive correctness monitoring for wireless sensor
                 networks using hierarchical distributed run-time
                 invariant checking",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "2",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "8:1--8:??",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2007",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1278460.1278462",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Fri Apr 24 17:34:20 MDT 2009",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "This article presents a hierarchical approach for
                 detecting faults in wireless sensor networks (WSNs)
                 after they have been deployed. The developers of WSNs
                 can specify ``invariants'' that must be satisfied by
                 the WSNs. We present a framework, Hierarchical SEnsor
                 Network Debugging (H-SEND), for lightweight checking of
                 invariants. H-SEND is able to detect a large class of
                 faults in data-gathering WSNs, and leverages the
                 existing message flow in the network by buffering and
                 piggybacking messages. H-SEND checks as closely to the
                 source of a fault as possible, pinpointing the fault
                 quickly and efficiently in terms of additional network
                 traffic. Therefore, H-SEND is suited to bandwidth or
                 communication energy constrained networks. A
                 specification expression is provided for specifying
                 invariants so that a protocol developer can write
                 behavioral level invariants. We hypothesize that data
                 from sensor nodes does not change dramatically, but
                 rather changes gradually over time. We extend our
                 framework for the invariants that includes values
                 determined at run-time in order to detect data trends.
                 The value range can be based on information local to a
                 single node or the surrounding nodes' values. Using our
                 system, developers can write invariants to detect data
                 trends without prior knowledge of correct values.
                 Automatic value detection can be used to detect
                 anomalies that cannot be detected in existing WSNs. To
                 demonstrate the benefits of run-time range detection
                 and fault checking, we construct a prototype WSN using
                 CO$_2$ and temperature sensors coupled to Mica2 motes.
                 We show that our method can detect sudden changes of
                 the environments with little overhead in communication,
                 computation, and storage.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "8",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
  keywords =     "correctness monitoring; data integrity; fault
                 tolerance and diagnostics; in-network processing and
                 aggregation; Invariants; network protocols; programming
                 models and languages; run-time; tools",
}

@Article{Shyu:2007:NID,
  author =       "Mei-Ling Shyu and Thiago Quirino and Zongxing Xie and
                 Shu-Ching Chen and Liwu Chang",
  title =        "Network intrusion detection through Adaptive
                 Sub-Eigenspace Modeling in multiagent systems",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "2",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "9:1--9:??",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2007",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1278460.1278463",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Fri Apr 24 17:34:20 MDT 2009",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "Recently, network security has become an extremely
                 vital issue that beckons the development of accurate
                 and efficient solutions capable of effectively
                 defending our network systems and the valuable
                 information journeying through them. In this article, a
                 distributed multiagent intrusion detection system (IDS)
                 architecture is proposed, which attempts to provide an
                 accurate and lightweight solution to network intrusion
                 detection by tackling issues associated with the design
                 of a distributed multiagent system, such as poor system
                 scalability and the requirements of excessive
                 processing power and memory storage. The proposed IDS
                 architecture consists of (i) the Host layer with
                 lightweight host agents that perform anomaly detection
                 in network connections to their respective hosts, and
                 (ii) the Classification layer whose main functions are
                 to perform misuse detection for the host agents, detect
                 distributed attacks, and disseminate network security
                 status information to the whole network. The intrusion
                 detection task is achieved through the employment of
                 the lightweight Adaptive Sub-Eigenspace Modeling
                 (ASEM)-based anomaly and misuse detection schemes.
                 Promising experimental results indicate that ASEM-based
                 schemes outperform the KNN and LOF algorithms, with
                 high detection rates and low false alarm rates in the
                 anomaly detection task, and outperform several
                 well-known supervised classification methods such as
                 C4.5 Decision Tree, SVM, NN, KNN, Logistic, and
                 Decision Table (DT) in the misuse detection task. To
                 assess the performance in a real-world scenario, the
                 Relative Assumption Model, feature extraction
                 techniques, and common network attack generation tools
                 are employed to generate normal and anomalous traffic
                 in a private LAN testbed. Furthermore, the scalability
                 performance of the proposed IDS architecture is
                 investigated through the simulation of the proposed
                 agent communication scheme, and satisfactory linear
                 relationships for both degradation of system response
                 time and agent communication generated network traffic
                 overhead are achieved.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "9",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
  keywords =     "adaptive sub-eigenspace modeling (ASEM); Agent
                 communications; agent-based distributed system;
                 intrusion detection; network security",
}

@Article{Ren:2007:RRS,
  author =       "Shangping Ren and Yue Yu and Nianen Chen and Jeffrey
                 J.-P. Tsai and Kevin Kwiat",
  title =        "The role of roles in supporting reconfigurability and
                 fault localizations for open distributed and embedded
                 systems",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "2",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "10:1--10:??",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2007",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1278460.1278464",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Fri Apr 24 17:34:20 MDT 2009",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "One of the main characteristics of open distributed
                 embedded systems is that the involved entities are
                 often very dynamic --- different individual entities
                 may join or leave the systems frequently. Therefore,
                 systems built of these dynamic entities must be runtime
                 reconfigurable. In addition, large classes of open
                 embedded systems often have high availability and
                 dependability requirements. However, the openness makes
                 these requirements more difficult to achieve and the
                 system more vulnerable to attacks.\par

                 This article presents a coordination model, the Actor,
                 Role and Coordinator (ARC) model, that aims to support
                 reconfigurability and fault localization for open
                 distributed embedded software systems. In particular,
                 the actor model is used to model concurrent embedded
                 entities, while the system's reconfigurability and
                 dependability requirements are encapsulated within
                 coordination objects: roles and coordinators, and are
                 achieved through coordination among the actors. Roles,
                 as a key thrust in the ARC model not only represent an
                 abstraction for a set of behaviors shared by a group of
                 actors so that reconfiguration within the roles becomes
                 transparent to entities outside the roles, but also
                 assume coordination responsibilities among the member
                 actors. The article also argues from both analytical
                 and empirical perspectives that with the support of the
                 role, faults can be localized within actors, and actor
                 level reconfiguration becomes transparent to the
                 system.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "10",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
  keywords =     "actors; coordination; coordinators; open distributed
                 embedded systems; roles",
}

@Article{Watanabe:2007:RFP,
  author =       "Kenichi Watanabe and Yoshio Nakajima and Tomoya
                 Enokido and Makoto Takizawa",
  title =        "Ranking factors in peer-to-peer overlay networks",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "2",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "11:1--11:??",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2007",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1278460.1278465",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Fri Apr 24 17:34:20 MDT 2009",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "A large number of peer processes are distributed in a
                 peer-to-peer (P2P) overlay network. It is difficult,
                 maybe impossible for a peer to perceive the membership
                 and location of every resource object due to the
                 scalability and openness of a P2P network. In this
                 article, we discuss a fully distributed P2P system
                 where there is no centralized controller. Each peer has
                 to obtain service information from its acquaintance
                 peers and also send its service information to the
                 acquaintance peers. An acquaintance peer of a peer {\em
                 p\/} is a peer about whose service the peer {\em p\/}
                 knows and with which the peer {\em p\/} can directly
                 communicate in an overlay network. Some acquaintance
                 peer might hold obsolete service information and might
                 be faulty. Each peer has to find a more trustworthy one
                 among acquaintance peers. There are many discussions on
                 how to detect peers that hold a target object. However,
                 a peer cannot manipulate an object without being
                 granted access rights (permissions). In addition to
                 detecting what peers hold a target object, we have to
                 find peers granted access rights to manipulate the
                 target object. The trustworthiness of each acquaintance
                 is defined in terms of the satisfiability and ranking
                 factor in this article. The satisfiability of an
                 acquaintance peer shows how much each peer can trust
                 the acquaintance peer through direct communication to
                 not only detect target objects but also obtain their
                 access rights. On the other hand, the ranking factor of
                 an acquaintance peer indicates how much the
                 acquaintance peer is trusted only by trustworthy
                 acquaintance peers which is different from the
                 traditional reputation concept. We evaluate how the
                 trustworthiness of an acquaintance peer is changed
                 through interactions among peers in a detection
                 algorithm.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "11",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
  keywords =     "acquaintances; P2P overlay networks; ranking factor;
                 satisfiability; trustworthiness",
}

@Article{Petta:2007:ISI,
  author =       "Paolo Petta and Andrea Omicini and Terry Payne and
                 Peter McBurney",
  title =        "Introduction to the special issue: The {AgentLink III}
                 technical forums",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "2",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "12:1--12:??",
  month =        nov,
  year =         "2007",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1293731.1293732",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Fri Apr 24 17:34:35 MDT 2009",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "This article introduces the special issue of {\em ACM
                 Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems\/}
                 devoted to research papers arising from the three
                 Technical Forum Group meetings held in 2004 and 2005
                 that were organized and sponsored by the European FP6
                 Coordination Action AgentLink III.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "12",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
  keywords =     "agent-oriented software engineering; AgentLink III;
                 autonomous agents; European research; multi-agent
                 systems; technical forums",
}

@Article{Locatelli:2007:ACU,
  author =       "Marco P. Locatelli and Giuseppe Vizzari",
  title =        "Awareness in collaborative ubiquitous environments:
                 The Multilayered Multi-Agent Situated System approach",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "2",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "13:1--13:??",
  month =        nov,
  year =         "2007",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1293731.1293733",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Fri Apr 24 17:34:35 MDT 2009",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "Collaborative Ubiquitous Environments (CUEs) are
                 environments that support collaboration among persons
                 in a context of ubiquitous computing. This article
                 shows how results of the research in the Multi-Agent
                 System (MAS) area, and in particular on MAS
                 environments, can be used to model, design and engineer
                 CUEs, with specific reference to the management of
                 context-awareness information. After a description of
                 the reference scenario, the Multilayered Multi-Agent
                 Situated System model will be introduced and applied to
                 represent and to manage several types of awareness
                 information (both physical and logical contextual
                 information). Finally, three different approaches to
                 the design and engineering of CUEs will then be
                 introduced and evaluated.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "13",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
  keywords =     "context awareness; MAS environments",
}

@Article{Paurobally:2007:FWS,
  author =       "Shamimabi Paurobally and Valentina Tamma and Michael
                 Wooldrdige",
  title =        "A Framework for {Web} service negotiation",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "2",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "14:1--14:??",
  month =        nov,
  year =         "2007",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1293731.1293734",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Fri Apr 24 17:34:35 MDT 2009",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "In a survey on the theory and practice of agent system
                 deployment, conducted by the AgentLink workgroup on
                 networked agents, it was found that there are an
                 increasing number of initiatives for the migration of
                 agents research towards new Internet technologies such
                 as the semantic web, Grid, and Web services. In fact,
                 Grid computing and multi-agent systems research have
                 similar objectives. They both aim to achieve
                 ``large-scale open distributed systems, capable of
                 being able to effectively and dynamically deploy and
                 redeploy computational (and other) resources as
                 required, to solve computationally complex problems''
                 [Foster and Kesselman 2003]. On the one hand,
                 service-oriented Grid architectures need to support
                 dynamic cooperation, negotiation, and adaptive
                 interactions between Web services controlling Grid
                 resources for efficient resource and task allocation
                 and execution. On the other hand, the Grid can
                 facilitate agent communication, life-cycle management,
                 and access to resources for agents. Although the
                 relevance of Grid for agent research and vice versa has
                 been identified in several forums, actual collaborative
                 applications are still in their infancy. In this
                 article, we discuss our recent work on deploying
                 multi-agent negotiation techniques to facilitate
                 dynamic negotiation for Grid resources as a step closer
                 to an adaptive and autonomous Grid. In particular, we
                 describe a Web service development of the Contract Net
                 Protocol for negotiation between insurance companies
                 and repair companies. We evaluate our approach to show
                 the added value of negotiable interactions between Web
                 services as opposed to inflexible single-shot
                 interactions that are currently the state of the art.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "14",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
  keywords =     "Grid; insurance; negotiation; Web services",
}

@Article{Poslad:2007:SPM,
  author =       "Stefan Poslad",
  title =        "Specifying protocols for multi-agent systems
                 interaction",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "2",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "15:1--15:??",
  month =        nov,
  year =         "2007",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1293731.1293735",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Fri Apr 24 17:34:35 MDT 2009",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "Multi-Agent-Systems or MAS represent a powerful
                 distributed computing model, enabling agents to
                 cooperate and complete with each other and to exchange
                 both semantic content and a semantic context to more
                 automatically and accurately interpret the content.
                 Many types of individual agent and MAS models have been
                 proposed since the mid-1980s, but the majority of these
                 have led to single developer homogeneous MAS systems.
                 For over a decade, the FIPA standards activity has
                 worked to produce public MAS specifications, acting as
                 a key enabler to support interoperability, open service
                 interaction, and to support heterogeneous development.
                 The main characteristics of the FIPA model for MAS and
                 an analysis of design, design choices and features of
                 the model is presented. In addition, a comparison of
                 the FIPA model for system interoperability versus those
                 of other standards bodies is presented, along with a
                 discussion of the current status of FIPA and future
                 directions.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "15",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
  keywords =     "autonomy; deployment; Multi-Agent systems; semantics;
                 social interaction; specifications",
}

@Article{Penserini:2007:HVD,
  author =       "Loris Penserini and Anna Perini and Angelo Susi and
                 John Mylopoulos",
  title =        "High variability design for software agents: Extending
                 Tropos",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "2",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "16:1--16:??",
  month =        nov,
  year =         "2007",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1293731.1293736",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Fri Apr 24 17:34:35 MDT 2009",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "Many classes of distributed applications, including
                 e-business, e-government, and ambient intelligence,
                 consist of networking infrastructures, where the nodes
                 (peers) --- be they software components, human actors
                 or organizational units --- cooperate with each other
                 to achieve shared goals. The multi-agent system
                 metaphor fits very well such settings because it is
                 founded on intentional and social concepts and
                 mechanisms. Not surprisingly, many agent-oriented
                 software development methods have been proposed,
                 including GAIA, PASSI, and {\em Tropos}. This paper
                 extends the {\em Tropos\/} methodology, enhancing its
                 ability to support high variability design through the
                 explicit modelling of alternatives, it adopts an
                 extended notion of agent capability and proposes a
                 refined {\em Tropos\/} design process. The paper also
                 presents an implemented software development
                 environment for {\em Tropos}, founded on the
                 Model-Driven Architecture (MDA) framework and
                 standards. The extended {\em Tropos\/} development
                 process is illustrated through a case study involving
                 an e-commerce application.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "16",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
  keywords =     "Agent capability design; agent-oriented software
                 engineering; early requirements; goal-oriented
                 requirements engineering",
}

@Article{Anonymous:2007:R,
  author =       "Anonymous",
  title =        "Reviewers 2007",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "2",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "17:1--17:??",
  month =        nov,
  year =         "2007",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1293731.1293737",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Fri Apr 24 17:34:35 MDT 2009",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "17",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Urgaonkar:2008:ADP,
  author =       "Bhuvan Urgaonkar and Prashant Shenoy and Abhishek
                 Chandra and Pawan Goyal and Timothy Wood",
  title =        "Agile dynamic provisioning of multi-tier {Internet}
                 applications",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "3",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "1:1--1:??",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2008",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1342171.1342172",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Fri Apr 24 17:34:52 MDT 2009",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "Dynamic capacity provisioning is a useful technique
                 for handling the multi-time-scale variations seen in
                 Internet workloads. In this article, we propose a novel
                 dynamic provisioning technique for multi-tier Internet
                 applications that employs (1) a flexible queuing model
                 to determine how much of the resources to allocate to
                 each tier of the application, and (2) a combination of
                 predictive and reactive methods that determine when to
                 provision these resources, both at large and small time
                 scales. We propose a novel data center architecture
                 based on virtual machine monitors to reduce
                 provisioning overheads. Our experiments on a
                 forty-machine Xen/Linux-based hosting platform
                 demonstrate the responsiveness of our technique in
                 handling dynamic workloads. In one scenario where a
                 flash crowd caused the workload of a three-tier
                 application to double, our technique was able to double
                 the application capacity within five minutes, thus
                 maintaining response-time targets. Our technique also
                 reduced the overhead of switching servers across
                 applications from several minutes to less than a
                 second, while meeting the performance targets of
                 residual sessions.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "1",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
  keywords =     "dynamic provisioning; Internet application",
}

@Article{Hilaire:2008:AAA,
  author =       "Vincent Hilaire and Abder Koukam and Sebastian
                 Rodriguez",
  title =        "An adaptative agent architecture for holonic
                 multi-agent systems",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "3",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "2:1--2:??",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2008",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1342171.1342173",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Fri Apr 24 17:34:52 MDT 2009",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "Self-organized multi-agent systems (MAS) are still
                 difficult to engineer, because, to deal with real world
                 problems, a self-organized MAS should exhibit complex
                 adaptive organizations. In this respect the holonic
                 paradigm provides a solution for modelling complex
                 organizational structures. Holons are defined as
                 self-similar entities that are neither parts nor
                 wholes. The organizational structure produced by holons
                 is called a holarchy. A holonic MAS (HMAS) considers
                 agents as holons that are grouped according to
                 holarchies. The goal of this article is to introduce an
                 architecture that allows holons to adapt to their
                 environment. The metaphor is based upon the immune
                 system and considers stimulations/requests as antigens
                 and selected antibodies as reactions/answers. Each
                 antibody is activated by specific antigens and
                 stimulated and/or inhibited by other antibodies. The
                 immune system rewards (respectively penalizes) selected
                 antibodies, which constitutes a good (respectively
                 wrong) answer to a request. This mechanism allows an
                 agent to choose from a set of possible behaviors, the
                 one that seems the best fit for a specific context. In
                 this context, each holon, atomic or composed,
                 encapsulates an immune system in order to select a
                 behavior. For composed holons, each sub-holon is
                 represented by the selected antibody of its immune
                 system. The super-holon's immune system therefore
                 contains one antibody per sub-holon. This recursive
                 architecture corresponds with the recursive nature of
                 the holarchy. This architecture is presented with an
                 example of simulated robot soccer. From experiments
                 under different conditions we show that this
                 architecture has interesting properties.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "2",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
  keywords =     "Agents; holonic systems; immune systems",
}

@Article{Shen:2008:ABD,
  author =       "Chien-Chung Shen and Ke Li and Chaiporn Jaikaeo and
                 Vinay Sridhara",
  title =        "Ant-based distributed constrained {Steiner} tree
                 algorithm for jointly conserving energy and bounding
                 delay in ad hoc multicast routing",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "3",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "3:1--3:??",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2008",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1342171.1342174",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Fri Apr 24 17:34:52 MDT 2009",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "The minimum-energy multicast tree problem aims to
                 construct a multicast tree rooted at the source node
                 and spanning all the destination nodes such that the
                 sum of transmission power at non-leaf nodes is
                 minimized. However, aggressive power assignment at
                 non-leaf nodes, although conserving more energy,
                 results in multicast trees that suffer from higher hop
                 count and jeopardizes delay-sensitive applications,
                 signifying a clear tradeoff between energy efficiency
                 and delay. This article formulates these issues as a
                 {\em constrained Steiner tree\/} problem, and describes
                 a distributed constrained Steiner tree algorithm, which
                 jointly conserves energy and bounds delay for multicast
                 routing in ad hoc networks. In particular, the proposed
                 algorithm concurrently constructs a constrained Steiner
                 tree, performs transmission power assignment at
                 non-leaf nodes, and strives to minimize the sum of
                 transmission power of non-leaf nodes, subject to the
                 given maximum hop count constraint. Simulation results
                 validate the effectiveness and reveal the
                 characteristics of the proposed algorithm.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "3",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
  keywords =     "Ad hoc networks; constrained Steiner tree; multicast;
                 swarm intelligence",
}

@Article{Gelenbe:2008:AQA,
  author =       "Erol Gelenbe and Georgia Sakellari and Maurizio
                 D'arienzo",
  title =        "Admission of {QoS} aware users in a smart network",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "3",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "4:1--4:??",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2008",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1342171.1342175",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Fri Apr 24 17:34:52 MDT 2009",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "Smart networks have grown out of the need for stable,
                 reliable, and predictable networks that will guarantee
                 packet delivery under Quality of Service (QoS)
                 constraints. In this article we present a
                 measurement-based admission control algorithm that
                 helps control traffic congestion and guarantee QoS
                 throughout the lifetime of a connection. When a new
                 user requests to enter the network, probe packets are
                 sent from the source to the destination to estimate the
                 impact that the new connection will have on the QoS of
                 both the new and the existing users. The algorithm uses
                 a novel algebra of QoS metrics, inspired by Warshall's
                 algorithm, to look for a path with acceptable QoS
                 values to accommodate the new flow. We describe the
                 underlying mathematical principles and present
                 experimental results obtained by evaluating the method
                 in a large laboratory test-bed operating the Cognitive
                 Packet Network (CPN) protocol.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "4",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
  keywords =     "cognitive packet network; measurement-based admission
                 control; quality of service; self-aware",
}

@Article{Forestiero:2008:GSO,
  author =       "Agostino Forestiero and Carlo Mastroianni and
                 Giandomenico Spezzano",
  title =        "{So-Grid}: a self-organizing {Grid} featuring
                 bio-inspired algorithms",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "3",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "5:1--5:??",
  month =        may,
  year =         "2008",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1352789.1352790",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Fri Apr 24 17:35:04 MDT 2009",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "This article presents So-Grid, a set of bio-inspired
                 algorithms tailored to the decentralized construction
                 of a {\em Grid\/} information system that features
                 adaptive and self-organization characteristics. Such
                 algorithms exploit the properties of {\em swarm\/}
                 systems, in which a number of entities/agents perform
                 simple operations at the local level, but together
                 engender an advanced form of {\em swarm intelligence\/}
                 at the global level. In particular, So-Grid provides
                 two main functionalities: logical reorganization of
                 resources, inspired by the behavior of some species of
                 ants and termites that move and collect items within
                 their environment, and resource discovery, inspired by
                 the mechanisms through which ants searching for food
                 sources are able to follow the pheromone traces left by
                 other ants. These functionalities are correlated, since
                 an intelligent dissemination can facilitate discovery.
                 In the Grid environment, a number of ant-like agents
                 autonomously travel the Grid through P2P
                 interconnections and use biased probability functions
                 to: (i) replicate resource descriptors in order to
                 favor resource discovery; (ii) collect resource
                 descriptors with similar characteristics in nearby Grid
                 hosts; (iii) foster the dissemination of descriptors
                 corresponding to {\em fresh\/} (recently updated)
                 resources and to resources having high quality of
                 service (QoS) characteristics. Simulation analysis
                 shows that the So-Grid replication algorithm is capable
                 of reducing the entropy of the system and efficiently
                 disseminating content. Moreover, as descriptors are
                 progressively reorganized and replicated, the So-Grid
                 discovery algorithm allows users to reach Grid hosts
                 that store information about a larger number of useful
                 resources in a shorter amount of time. The proposed
                 approach features characteristics, including
                 self-organization, scalability and adaptivity, which
                 make it useful for a dynamic and partially unreliable
                 distributed system.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "5",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
  keywords =     "Grid; multiagent systems; P2P; resource discovery;
                 self-organization; swarm intelligence",
}

@Article{Gounaris:2008:CTA,
  author =       "Anastasios Gounaris and Christos Yfoulis and Rizos
                 Sakellariou and Marios D. Dikaiakos",
  title =        "A control theoretical approach to self-optimizing
                 block transfer in {Web} service grids",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "3",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "6:1--6:??",
  month =        may,
  year =         "2008",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1352789.1352791",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Fri Apr 24 17:35:04 MDT 2009",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "Nowadays, Web Services (WS) play an important role in
                 the dissemination and distributed processing of large
                 amounts of data that become available on the Web. In
                 many cases, it is essential to retrieve and process
                 such data in blocks, in order to benefit from pipelined
                 parallelism and reduced communication costs. This
                 article deals with the problem of minimizing at
                 runtime, in a self-managing way, the total response
                 time of a call to a database exposed to a volatile
                 environment, like the Grid, as a WS. Typically, in this
                 scenario, response time exhibits a concave, nonlinear
                 behavior depending on the client-controlled size of the
                 individual requests comprising a fixed size task. In
                 addition, no accurate profiling or internal state
                 information is available, and the optimum point is
                 volatile. This situation is encountered in several
                 systems, such as WS Management Systems (WSMS) for
                 DBMS-like data management over wide area service-based
                 networks, and the widely spread OGSA-DAI WS for
                 accessing and integrating traditional DBMS. The main
                 challenges in this problem apart from the
                 unavailability of a model, include the presence of
                 noise, which incurs local minima, the volatility of the
                 environment, which results in moving optimum operating
                 point, and the requirements for fast convergence to the
                 optimal size of the request from the side of the client
                 rather than of the server, and for low overshooting.
                 Two solutions are presented in this work, which fall
                 into the broader areas of runtime optimization and
                 switching extremum control. They incorporate heuristics
                 to avoid local optimal points, and address all the
                 aforementioned challenges. The effectiveness of the
                 solutions is verified via both empirical evaluation in
                 real cases and simulations, which show that significant
                 performance benefits can be provided rendering obsolete
                 the need for detailed profiling of the WS.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "6",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
  keywords =     "Autonomic computing; control theory; data grids;
                 extremum control; OGSA-DAI; Web Services",
}

@Article{Garruzzo:2008:ACB,
  author =       "Salvatore Garruzzo and Domenico Rosaci",
  title =        "Agent clustering based on semantic negotiation",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "3",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "7:1--7:??",
  month =        may,
  year =         "2008",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1352789.1352792",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Fri Apr 24 17:35:04 MDT 2009",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "Forming groups of agents is an important task in many
                 agent-based applications, for example when determining
                 a coalition of buyers in an e-commerce community or
                 organizing different Web services in a Web services'
                 composition. A key issue in this context is that of
                 generating groups of agents such that the communication
                 among agents of the same group is not subjected to
                 comprehension problems. To this purpose, several
                 approaches have been proposed in the past in order to
                 form groups of agents based on some similarity measures
                 among agents. Such similarity measures are mainly based
                 on lexical and/or structural similarities among agent
                 ontologies. However, the necessity of taking into
                 account a semantic component of the similarity value
                 arises, for example by considering the context in which
                 a term is used in an agent ontology. Therefore we
                 propose a clustering technique based on the HISENE
                 semantic negotiation protocol, using a similarity value
                 that has lexical, structural and semantic components.
                 Moreover, we introduce a suitable multiagent
                 architecture that allows computing agent similarities
                 by means of an efficient distributed approach.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "7",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
  keywords =     "Ontologies; open multiagent systems; semantic
                 negotiation",
}

@Article{Baumes:2008:VVR,
  author =       "Jeffrey Baumes and Hung-Ching (Justin) Chen and
                 Matthew Francisco and Mark Goldberg and Malik
                 Magdon-Ismail and William Wallace",
  title =        "{ViSAGE}: a {\em Vi\/} rtual Laboratory for {\em
                 S\/}imulation and {\em A\/}nalysis of Social {\em
                 G\/}roup {\em E\/}volution",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "3",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "8:1--8:??",
  month =        aug,
  year =         "2008",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1380422.1380423",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Fri Apr 24 17:35:13 MDT 2009",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "We present a modeling laboratory, Virtual Laboratory
                 for the Simulation and Analysis of Social Group
                 Evolution (ViSAGE), that views the organization of
                 human communities and the experience of individuals in
                 a community as contingent upon on the dynamic
                 properties, or {\em micro-laws}, of social groups. The
                 laboratory facilitates the theorization and validation
                 of these properties through an iterative research
                 processes that involves (1) forward simulation
                 experiments, which are used to formalize dynamic group
                 properties, (2) reverse engineering from real data on
                 how the parameters are distributed among individual
                 actors in the community, and (3) grounded research,
                 such as participant observation, that follows specific
                 activities of real actors in a community and determines
                 if, or how well, the micro-laws describe the way
                 choices are made in real world, local settings. In this
                 article we report on the design of ViSAGE. We first
                 give some background to the model. Next we detail each
                 component. We then describe a set of simulation
                 experiments that we used to further design and clarify
                 ViSAGE as a tool for studying emergent
                 properties/phenomena in social networks.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "8",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
  keywords =     "agent-based modeling and simulation; social capital;
                 virtual social science laboratory",
}

@Article{Koshutanski:2008:IAC,
  author =       "Hristo Koshutanski and Fabio Massacci",
  title =        "Interactive access control for autonomic systems: From
                 theory to implementation",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "3",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "9:1--9:??",
  month =        aug,
  year =         "2008",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1380422.1380424",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Fri Apr 24 17:35:13 MDT 2009",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "Autonomic communication and computing is a new
                 paradigm for dynamic service integration over a
                 network. An autonomic network crosses organizational
                 and management boundaries and is provided by entities
                 that see each other just as partners. For many services
                 no autonomic partner may guess a priori what will be
                 sent by clients nor clients know a priori what
                 credentials are required to access a service.\par

                 To address this problem we propose a new {\em
                 interactive access control\/}: servers should interact
                 with clients, asking for missing credentials necessary
                 to grant access, whereas clients may supply or decline
                 the requested credentials. Servers evaluate their
                 policies and interact with clients until a decision of
                 grant or deny is taken.\par

                 This proposal is grounded in a formal model on
                 policy-based access control. It identifies the formal
                 reasoning services of deduction, abduction and
                 consistency. Based on them, the work proposes a
                 comprehensive access control framework for autonomic
                 systems. An implementation of the interactive model is
                 given followed by system performance evaluation.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "9",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
  keywords =     "abduction; autonomic systems; disclosure control;
                 Interactive access control; logic programming;
                 nonmonotonic policy",
}

@Article{Yu:2008:AAT,
  author =       "Zhenwei Yu and Jeffrey J. P. Tsai and Thomas
                 Weigert",
  title =        "An adaptive automatically tuning intrusion detection
                 system",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "3",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "10:1--10:??",
  month =        aug,
  year =         "2008",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1380422.1380425",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Fri Apr 24 17:35:13 MDT 2009",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "An intrusion detection system (IDS) is a security
                 layer to detect ongoing intrusive activities in
                 computer systems and networks. Current IDS have two
                 main problems: The first problem is that typically so
                 many alarms are generated as to overwhelm the system
                 operator, many of these being false alarms. The second
                 problem is that continuous tuning of the intrusion
                 detection model is required in order to maintain
                 sufficient performance due to the dynamically changing
                 nature of the monitored system. This manual tuning
                 process relies on the system operators to work out the
                 updated tuning solution and to integrate it into the
                 detection model.\par

                 In this article, we present an automatically tuning
                 intrusion detection system, which controls the number
                 of alarms output to the system operator and tunes the
                 detection model on the fly according to feedback
                 provided by the system operator when false predictions
                 are identified. This system adapts its behavior (i) by
                 throttling the volume of alarms output to the operator
                 in response to the ability of the operator to respond
                 to these alarms, and (ii) by deciding how aggressively
                 the detection model should be tuned based on the
                 accuracy of earlier predictions. We evaluated our
                 system using the KDDCup'99 intrusion detection dataset.
                 Our results show that an adaptive, automatically tuning
                 intrusion detection system will be both practical and
                 efficient.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "10",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
  keywords =     "Fuzzy control; intrusion detection",
}

@Article{Ko:2008:NCN,
  author =       "Steven Y. Ko and Indranil Gupta and Yookyung Jo",
  title =        "A new class of nature-inspired algorithms for
                 self-adaptive peer-to-peer computing",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "3",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "11:1--11:??",
  month =        aug,
  year =         "2008",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1380422.1380426",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Fri Apr 24 17:35:13 MDT 2009",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "We present, and evaluate benefits of, a design
                 methodology for translating natural phenomena
                 represented as mathematical models, into novel,
                 self-adaptive, peer-to-peer (p2p) distributed computing
                 algorithms ({\em protocols\/}). Concretely, our first
                 contribution is a set of techniques to translate
                 discrete {\em sequence equations\/} (also known as
                 difference equations) into new p2p protocols called
                 {\em sequence protocols}. Sequence protocols are
                 self-adaptive, scalable, and fault-tolerant, with
                 applicability in p2p settings like Grids. A sequence
                 protocol is a set of probabilistic local and
                 message-passing actions for each process. These actions
                 are translated from terms in a set of source sequence
                 equations. Individual processes do not simulate the
                 source sequence equations completely. Instead, each
                 process executes probabilistic local and message
                 passing actions, so that the emergent round-to-round
                 behavior of the sequence protocol in a p2p system can
                 be probabilistically predicted by the source sequence
                 equations. The article's second contribution is the
                 design and evaluation of a set of sequence protocols
                 for detection of two global triggers in a distributed
                 system: threshold detection and interval detection.
                 This article's third contribution is a new
                 self-adaptive Grid computing protocol called
                 HoneyAdapt. HoneyAdapt is derived from sequence
                 equations modeling adaptive bee foraging behavior in
                 nature. HoneyAdapt is intended for Grid applications
                 that allow Grid clients, at run-time, a choice of
                 algorithms for executing chunks of the application's
                 dataset. HoneyAdapt tells each Grid client how to
                 adaptively select at run-time, for each chunk it
                 receives, a good algorithm for computing the chunk ---
                 this selection is based on continuous feedback from
                 other clients. Finally, we design a variant of
                 HoneyAdapt, called HoneySort, for application to Grid
                 parallelized sorting settings using the master-worker
                 paradigm. Our evaluation of these contributions
                 consists of mathematical analysis, large-scale
                 trace-based simulation results, and experimental
                 results from a HoneySort deployment.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "11",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
  keywords =     "adaptivity; autonomic computing and communication;
                 bio-inspired techniques; Complex adaptive systems;
                 convergence; design methodology; difference equations;
                 distributed protocols; grid computing; probabilistic
                 protocols; sequence equations; sequence protocols",
}

@Article{Datta:2008:ISI,
  author =       "Ajoy K. Datta",
  title =        "Introduction to special issue on stabilization,
                 safety, and security of distributed systems",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "3",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "12:1--12:??",
  month =        nov,
  year =         "2008",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1452001.1452002",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Fri Apr 24 17:35:25 MDT 2009",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "12",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Angluin:2008:SSP,
  author =       "Dana Angluin and James Aspnes and Michael J. Fischer
                 and Hong Jiang",
  title =        "Self-stabilizing population protocols",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "3",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "13:1--13:??",
  month =        nov,
  year =         "2008",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1452001.1452003",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Fri Apr 24 17:35:25 MDT 2009",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "This article studies self-stabilization in networks of
                 anonymous, asynchronously interacting nodes where the
                 size of the network is unknown. Constant-space
                 protocols are given for Dijkstra-style round-robin
                 token circulation, leader election in rings, two-hop
                 coloring in degree-bounded graphs, and establishing
                 consistent global orientation in an undirected ring. A
                 protocol to construct a spanning tree in regular graphs
                 using {\em O\/} (log {\em D\/}) memory is also given,
                 where {\em D\/} is the diameter of the graph. A general
                 method for eliminating nondeterministic transitions
                 from the self-stabilizing implementation of a large
                 family of behaviors is used to simplify the
                 constructions, and general conditions under which
                 protocol composition preserves behavior are used in
                 proving their correctness.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "13",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
  keywords =     "Anonymous; fairness; finite-state; population
                 protocols; self-stabilization; sensor networks",
}

@Article{Cao:2008:MEN,
  author =       "Hui Cao and Emre Ertin and Anish Arora",
  title =        "{MiniMax} equilibrium of networked differential
                 games",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "3",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "14:1--14:??",
  month =        nov,
  year =         "2008",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1452001.1452004",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Fri Apr 24 17:35:25 MDT 2009",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "Surveillance systems based on wireless sensor network
                 technology have been shown to successfully detect,
                 classify and track evaders over a large area. State
                 information collected via the sensor network also
                 enables these systems to actuate mobile agents so as to
                 achieve surveillance goals, such as target capture and
                 asset protection. But satisfying these goals is
                 complicated by the fact that the track information in a
                 sensor network is routed to mobile agents through
                 multihop wireless communication links and is thus
                 subject to message delays and losses. Stabilization
                 must also be considered in designing pursuer strategies
                 so as to deal with state corruption as well as
                 suboptimal evader strategies.\par

                 In this article, we formulate optimal pursuit control
                 strategies in the presence of network effects, assuming
                 that target track information has been established
                 locally in the sensor network. We adapt ideas from the
                 theory of differential games to networked games ---
                 including ones involving nonperiodic track updates,
                 message losses and message delays --- to derive optimal
                 strategies, bounds on the information requirements, and
                 scaling properties of these bounds. We show the
                 inherent stabilization features of our pursuit
                 strategies, both in terms of implementation as well as
                 the strategies themselves.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "14",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
  keywords =     "delay; differential games; equilibrium; sensor
                 networks",
}

@Article{Cohen:2008:ESS,
  author =       "Johanne Cohen and Anurag Dasgupta and Sukumar Ghosh
                 and S{\'e}bastien Tixeuil",
  title =        "An exercise in selfish stabilization",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "3",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "15:1--15:??",
  month =        nov,
  year =         "2008",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1452001.1452005",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Fri Apr 24 17:35:25 MDT 2009",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "Stabilizing distributed systems expect all the
                 component processes to run predefined programs that are
                 externally mandated. In Internet scale systems, this is
                 unrealistic, since each process may have selfish
                 interests and motives related to maximizing its own
                 payoff. This article formulates the problem of selfish
                 stabilization to show how competition blends with
                 cooperation in a stabilizing environment.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "15",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
  keywords =     "convergences; equilibrium; selfishness;
                 Stabilization",
}

@Article{Dieudonne:2008:CFW,
  author =       "Yoann Dieudonn{\'e} and Ouiddad Labbani-Igbida and
                 Franck Petit",
  title =        "Circle formation of weak mobile robots",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "3",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "16:1--16:??",
  month =        nov,
  year =         "2008",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1452001.1452006",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Fri Apr 24 17:35:25 MDT 2009",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "We consider distributed systems made of {\em weak
                 mobile\/} robots, that is, mobile devices, equipped
                 with sensors, that are {\em anonymous}, {\em
                 autonomous}, {\em disoriented}, and {\em oblivious}.
                 The {\em Circle Formation Problem\/} (CFP) consists of
                 the design of a protocol insuring that, starting from
                 an initial arbitrary configuration where no two robots
                 are at the same position, all the robots eventually
                 form a {\em regular n-gon\/} --- the robots take place
                 on the circumference of a circle {\em C\/} with equal
                 spacing between any two adjacent robots on {\em
                 C}.\par

                 CFP is known to be unsolvable by arranging the robots
                 evenly along the circumference of a circle {\em C\/}
                 without leaving {\em C\/} --- that is, starting from a
                 configuration where the robots are on the boundary of
                 {\em C}. We circumvent this impossibility result by
                 designing a scheme based on {\em concentric circles}.
                 This is the first scheme that deterministically solves
                 CFP. We present our method with two different
                 implementations working in the semi-synchronous system
                 (SSM) for any number {\em n\/} \geq 5 of robots.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "16",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
  keywords =     "Distributed computing; formation of geometric
                 patterns; mobile robot networks; self-deployment",
}

@Article{Dolev:2008:SSD,
  author =       "Shlomi Dolev and Reuven Yagel",
  title =        "Self-stabilizing device drivers",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "3",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "17:1--17:??",
  month =        nov,
  year =         "2008",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1452001.1452007",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Fri Apr 24 17:35:25 MDT 2009",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "This work presents approaches for designing the
                 input-output device management components of
                 self-stabilizing operating systems. As an example, we
                 demonstrate the nonstability of the ata standard
                 protocol for storage devices. We state the requirements
                 that an operating system and I/O devices should satisfy
                 in order to become self-stabilizing. Then we suggest
                 two solutions to satisfy these requirements. The first
                 uses leases to guarantee progress from the I/O device
                 side. The second assumes stabilization of the I/O
                 device, and uses snapshots to perform consistency
                 checks. A device driver for a PC hard-disk, using the
                 first solution, was implemented. By supplying an
                 infrastructure for practical self-stabilizing systems,
                 robust and dependable systems can be achieved.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "17",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Elmallah:2008:LK,
  author =       "Ehab S. Elmallah and Mohamed G. Gouda and Sandeep S.
                 Kulkarni",
  title =        "Logarithmic keying",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "3",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "18:1--18:??",
  month =        nov,
  year =         "2008",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1452001.1452008",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Fri Apr 24 17:35:25 MDT 2009",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "Consider a communication network where each process
                 needs to securely exchange messages with its
                 neighboring processes. In this network, each sent
                 message is encrypted using one or more symmetric keys
                 that are shared only between two processes: the process
                 that sends the message and the neighboring process that
                 receives the message. A straightforward scheme for
                 assigning symmetric keys to the different processes in
                 such a network is to assign each process {\em O\/}
                 ({\em d\/}) keys, where {\em d\/} is the maximum number
                 of neighbors of any process in the network. In this
                 article, we present a more efficient scheme for
                 assigning symmetric keys to the different processes in
                 a communication network. This scheme, which is referred
                 to as logarithmic keying, assigns {\em O\/} (log {\em
                 d\/}) symmetric keys to each process in the network. We
                 show that logarithmic keying can be used in rich
                 classes of communication networks that include star
                 networks, acyclic networks, limited-cycle networks,
                 planar networks, and dense bipartite networks. In
                 addition, we present a construction that utilizes
                 efficient keying schemes for general bipartite networks
                 to construct efficient keying schemes for general
                 networks.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "18",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
  keywords =     "keying scheme; secure communications; symmetric keys",
}

@Article{Dastidar:2008:SPP,
  author =       "Kajari Ghosh Dastidar and Ted Herman and Colette
                 Johnen",
  title =        "Safe peer-to-peer self-downloading",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "3",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "19:1--19:??",
  month =        nov,
  year =         "2008",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1452001.1452009",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Fri Apr 24 17:35:25 MDT 2009",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "A goal of peer-to-peer applications is to share files
                 between users themselves rather than downloading files
                 from file servers. Self-downloading protocols have the
                 property that, eventually, every user downloads only
                 from other users. Self-downloading is problematic if
                 users disconnect from the system upon completing file
                 downloading, because they only share with other users
                 while connected. Yet, if users continue to arrive at a
                 sufficient rate, self-downloading protocols are
                 possible. One vulnerability of file sharing between
                 users is the possibility that files or segments could
                 be counterfeit or corrupt. Protocols that are {\em d\/}
                 -safe tolerate some number of instances of faulty
                 segments in a file being downloaded, because each
                 segment is downloaded {\em d\/} times before being
                 shared. This article shows that {\em d\/} -safe
                 self-downloading is possible for a sufficiently large
                 arrival rate of users to the system. Upper and lower
                 connectivity and sharing bounds are given for {\em d\/}
                 = 2, and simulation results show effects of relaxing
                 assumptions about arrival rates and bandwidth.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "19",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
  keywords =     "Peer-to-peer distributed systems",
}

@Article{Guerraoui:2008:GCI,
  author =       "R. Guerraoui and N. Lynch",
  title =        "A general characterization of indulgence",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "3",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "20:1--20:??",
  month =        nov,
  year =         "2008",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1452001.1452010",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Fri Apr 24 17:35:25 MDT 2009",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "An indulgent algorithm is a distributed algorithm
                 that, besides tolerating process failures, also
                 tolerates unreliable information about the interleaving
                 of the processes. This article presents a general
                 characterization of indulgence in an abstract computing
                 model that encompasses various communication and
                 resilience schemes. We use our characterization to
                 establish several results about the inherent power and
                 limitations of indulgent algorithms.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "20",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
  keywords =     "agreement; process failures; scheduling failures",
}

@Article{Anonymous:2008:R,
  author =       "Anonymous",
  title =        "Reviewers 2008",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "3",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "21:1--21:??",
  month =        nov,
  year =         "2008",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1452001.1452011",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Fri Apr 24 17:35:25 MDT 2009",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "21",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Datta:2009:ISI,
  author =       "Ajoy K. Datta",
  title =        "Introduction to special issue on stabilization,
                 safety, and security of distributed systems",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "4",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "1:1--1:??",
  month =        jan,
  year =         "2009",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1462187.1462188",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Fri Apr 24 17:35:49 MDT 2009",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "1",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Ammari:2009:FTM,
  author =       "Habib M. Ammari and Sajal K. Das",
  title =        "Fault tolerance measures for large-scale wireless
                 sensor networks",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "4",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "2:1--2:??",
  month =        jan,
  year =         "2009",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1462187.1462189",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Fri Apr 24 17:35:49 MDT 2009",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "{\em Connectivity}, primarily a graph-theoretic
                 concept, helps define the {\em fault tolerance\/} of
                 wireless sensor networks (WSNs) in the sense that it
                 enables the sensors to communicate with each other so
                 their sensed data can reach the sink. On the other
                 hand, {\em sensing coverage}, an intrinsic
                 architectural feature of WSNs plays an important role
                 in meeting application-specific requirements, for
                 example, to reliably extract relevant data about a
                 sensed field. Sensing coverage and network connectivity
                 are not quite orthogonal concepts. In fact, it has been
                 proven that connectivity strongly depends on coverage
                 and hence considerable attention has been paid to
                 establish tighter connection between them although only
                 loose lower bound on network connectivity of WSNs is
                 known. In this article, we investigate connectivity
                 based on the degree of sensing coverage by studying
                 {\em k-covered\/} WSNs, where every location in the
                 field is simultaneously covered (or sensed) by at least
                 {\em k\/} sensors (property known as {\em k-coverage},
                 where {\em k\/} is the {\em degree of coverage\/}). We
                 observe that to derive network connectivity of {\em
                 k\/} -covered WSNs, it is necessary to compute the
                 sensor spatial density required to guarantee {\em k\/}
                 -coverage. More precisely, we propose to use a model,
                 called the {\em Reuleaux Triangle}, to characterize
                 {\em k\/} -coverage with the help of Helly's Theorem
                 and the analysis of the intersection of sensing disks
                 of {\em k\/} sensors. Using a deterministic approach,
                 we show that the sensor spatial density to guarantee
                 {\em k\/} -coverage of a convex field is proportional
                 to {\em k\/} and inversely proportional to the sensing
                 range of the sensors. We also prove that network
                 connectivity of {\em k\/} -covered WSNs is higher than
                 their sensing coverage {\em k}. Furthermore, we propose
                 a new measure of fault tolerance for {\em k\/} -covered
                 WSNs, called {\em conditional fault tolerance}, based
                 on the concepts of {\em conditional connectivity\/} and
                 {\em forbidden faulty sensor set\/} that includes all
                 the neighbors of a given sensor. We prove that {\em
                 k\/} -covered WSNs can sustain a large number of sensor
                 failures provided that the faulty sensor set does not
                 include a forbidden faulty sensor set.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "2",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
  keywords =     "connectivity; coverage; fault tolerance; k -covered
                 wireless sensor networks",
}

@Article{Bapat:2009:CRS,
  author =       "S. Bapat and W. Leal and T. Kwon and P. Wei and A.
                 Arora",
  title =        "Chowkidar: Reliable and scalable health monitoring for
                 wireless sensor network testbeds",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "4",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "3:1--3:??",
  month =        jan,
  year =         "2009",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1462187.1462190",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Fri Apr 24 17:35:49 MDT 2009",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "Wireless sensor network (WSN) testbeds are useful
                 because they provide a way to test applications in an
                 environment that makes it easy to deploy experiments,
                 configure them statically or dynamically, and gather
                 performance information. However, WSNs are typically
                 composed of low-cost devices and tend to be unreliable,
                 with failures a common phenomenon. Accurate knowledge
                 of network health status, including nodes and links of
                 each type, is critical for correctly configuring
                 applications on WSN testbeds and for interpreting the
                 data collected from them.\par

                 In this article we present a stabilizing protocol,
                 Chowkidar, that provides accurate and efficient network
                 health monitoring in WSNs. Our approach adapts the
                 well-known problem of message-passing rooted spanning
                 tree construction and its use in propagation of
                 information with feedback (PIF) for the case of a WSN.
                 The Chowkidar protocol is initiated upon demand; that
                 is, it does not involve ongoing maintenance, and it
                 terminates with accurate results, including detection
                 of failure and restart during the monitoring process.
                 Chowkidar is distinguished from others in two important
                 ways. Given the resource constraints of WSNs, it is
                 message-efficient in that it uses only a few messages
                 per node. Also, it tolerates ongoing node and link
                 failure and node restart, in contrast to requiring that
                 faults stop during convergence.\par

                 We have implemented the Chowkidar protocol as part of
                 enabling a network health status service that is
                 tightly integrated with a remotely accessible wireless
                 sensor network testbed, Kansei, at The Ohio State
                 University. We present experimental results from this
                 testbed that validate the correctness and performance
                 of Chowkidar. We also report on initial experiences and
                 lessons learnt from the integration of Chowkidar with
                 Kansei, including feedback from both testbed users and
                 administrators who have found Chowkidar to be a useful
                 tool for improving the accuracy and efficiency of
                 testbed experimentation and maintenance, and the need
                 for well-defined policies to address issues such as
                 minimizing interference with concurrently running
                 experiments. Finally, we discuss extensions that
                 enhance the functionality and usability of Chowkidar.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "3",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
  keywords =     "health monitoring; PIF; protocol architecture;
                 stabilization; tree protocols; Wireless sensor
                 networks",
}

@Article{Biely:2009:OMD,
  author =       "Martin Biely and Josef Widder",
  title =        "Optimal message-driven implementations of omega with
                 mute processes",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "4",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "4:1--4:??",
  month =        jan,
  year =         "2009",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1462187.1462191",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Fri Apr 24 17:35:49 MDT 2009",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "We investigate the complexity of algorithms in
                 message-driven models. In such models, events in the
                 computation can only be caused by message receptions,
                 but not by the passage of time. Hutle and Widder
                 [2005a] have shown that there is no deterministic
                 message-driven self-stabilizing implementation of the
                 eventually strong failure detector and thus \Omega in
                 systems with uncertainty in message delays and channels
                 of unknown capacity using only bounded space. Under
                 stronger assumptions it was shown that even the
                 eventually perfect failure detector can be implemented
                 in message-driven systems consisting of at least {\em
                 f\/} + 2 processes ({\em f\/} being the upper bound on
                 the number of processes that crash during an
                 execution).\par

                 In this article we show that {\em f\/} + 2 is in fact a
                 lower bound in message-driven systems, even if
                 nonstabilizing algorithms are considered. This
                 contrasts time-driven models where {\em f\/} + 1 is
                 sufficient for failure detector
                 implementations.\par

                 Moreover, we investigate algorithms where not all
                 processes send message, that is, are active, but some
                 (in a predetermined set) remain passive. Here, we show
                 that the {\em f\/} + 2 processes required for
                 message-driven systems must be active, while in
                 time-driven systems it suffices that {\em f\/}
                 processes are active.\par

                 We also provide message-driven implementations of
                 \Omega . Our algorithms are efficient in the sense that
                 not all processes have to send messages forever, which
                 is an improvement to previous message-driven failure
                 detector implementations.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "4",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
  keywords =     "Fault tolerance; lower bound; message-driven
                 distributed algorithm; unreliable failure detectors",
}

@Article{Bonakdarpour:2009:CRR,
  author =       "Borzoo Bonakdarpour and Ali Ebnenasir and Sandeep S.
                 Kulkarni",
  title =        "Complexity results in revising {UNITY} programs",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "4",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "5:1--5:??",
  month =        jan,
  year =         "2009",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1462187.1462192",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Fri Apr 24 17:35:49 MDT 2009",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "We concentrate on automatic revision of untimed and
                 real-time programs with respect to UNITY properties.
                 The main focus of this article is to identify instances
                 where addition of UNITY properties can be achieved
                 efficiently (in polynomial time) and where the problem
                 of adding UNITY properties is difficult (NP-complete).
                 Regarding efficient revision, we present a sound and
                 complete algorithm that adds a single {\em leads-to\/}
                 property (respectively, {\em bounded-time leads-to\/}
                 property) and a conjunction of {\em unless, stable},
                 and {\em invariant\/} properties (respectively, {\em
                 bounded-time unless\/} and {\em stable\/}) to an
                 existing untimed (respectively, real-time) UNITY
                 program in polynomial-time in the state space
                 (respectively, region graph) of the given program.
                 Regarding hardness results, we show that (1) while one
                 {\em leads-to\/} (respectively, {\em ensures\/})
                 property can be added in polynomial-time, the problem
                 of adding two such properties (or any combination of
                 {\em leads-to\/} and {\em ensures\/}) is NP-complete,
                 (2) if maximum non-determinism is desired then the
                 problem of adding even a single {\em leads-to\/}
                 property is NP-complete, and (3) the problem of
                 providing maximum non-determinism while adding a single
                 {\em bounded-time leads-to\/} property to a real-time
                 program is NP-complete (in the size of the program's
                 region graph) even if the original program satisfies
                 the corresponding {\em unbounded leads-to\/}
                 property.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "5",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
  keywords =     "formal methods; UNITY",
}

@Article{Cournier:2009:LES,
  author =       "Alain Cournier and Stephane Devismes and Vincent
                 Villain",
  title =        "Light enabling snap-stabilization of fundamental
                 protocols",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "4",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "6:1--6:??",
  month =        jan,
  year =         "2009",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1462187.1462193",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Fri Apr 24 17:35:49 MDT 2009",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "In this article, we show that some fundamental self-
                 and snap-stabilizing wave protocols (e.g., token
                 circulation, {\em PIF}, etc.) implicitly assume a very
                 light property that we call {\em BreakingIn}. We prove
                 that {\em BreakingIn\/} is strictly induced by self-
                 and snap-stabilization. Combined with a transformer,
                 {\em BreakingIn\/} allows to easily turn the
                 non-fault-tolerant versions of those protocols into
                 snap-stabilizing versions. Unlike the previous
                 solutions, the transformed protocols are very efficient
                 and work at least with the same daemon as the initial
                 versions extended to satisfy {\em BreakingIn}. Finally,
                 we show how to use an additional property of the
                 transformer to design snap-stabilizing extensions of
                 those fundamental protocols like Mutual Exclusion.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "6",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
  keywords =     "Self- and snap-stabilization; transformer; wave
                 protocols",
}

@Article{Danturi:2009:SSP,
  author =       "Praveen Danturi and Mikhail Nesterenko and
                 S{\'e}bastien Tixeuil",
  title =        "Self-stabilizing philosophers with generic conflicts",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "4",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "7:1--7:??",
  month =        jan,
  year =         "2009",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1462187.1462194",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Fri Apr 24 17:35:49 MDT 2009",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "We generalize the classic dining philosophers problem
                 to separate the conflict and communication neighbors of
                 each process. Communication neighbors may directly
                 exchange information while conflict neighbors compete
                 for the access to the exclusive critical section of
                 code. This generalization is motivated by a number of
                 practical problems in distributed systems including
                 problems in wireless sensor networks. We present a
                 self-stabilizing deterministic algorithm --- {\em
                 GDP\/} that solves this generalized problem. Our
                 algorithm is terminating. We formally prove {\em GDP\/}
                 correct and evaluate its performance. We extend the
                 algorithm to handle a similarly generalized drinking
                 philosophers and the committee coordination problem. We
                 describe how {\em GDP\/} can be implemented in wireless
                 sensor networks and demonstrate that this
                 implementation does not jeopardize its correctness or
                 termination properties.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "7",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
  keywords =     "dining philosophers; self-stabilization",
}

@Article{Masuzawa:2009:BTK,
  author =       "Toshimitsu Masuzawa and S{\'e}bastien Tixeuil",
  title =        "On bootstrapping topology knowledge in anonymous
                 networks",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "4",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "8:1--8:??",
  month =        jan,
  year =         "2009",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1462187.1462195",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Fri Apr 24 17:35:49 MDT 2009",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "In this article, we quantify the amount of
                 ``practical'' information (i.e., views obtained from
                 the neighbors, colors attributed to the nodes and
                 links) to obtain ``theoretical'' information (i.e., the
                 local topology of the network up to distance {\em k\/})
                 in anonymous networks. In more detail, we show that a
                 coloring at distance 2 {\em k\/} + 1 is necessary and
                 sufficient to obtain the local topology at distance
                 {\em k\/} that includes outgoing links. This bound
                 drops to 2 {\em k\/} when outgoing links are not
                 needed. A second contribution of this article deals
                 with color bootstrapping (from which local topology can
                 be obtained using the aforementioned mechanisms). On
                 the negative side, we show that ({\em i\/}) with a
                 distributed daemon, it is impossible to achieve
                 deterministic color bootstrap, even if the whole
                 network topology can be instantaneously obtained, and
                 ({\em ii\/}) with a central daemon, it is impossible to
                 achieve distance {\em m\/} when instantaneous topology
                 knowledge is limited to {\em m\/} - 1. On the positive
                 side, we show that ({\em i\/}) under the {\em k\/}
                 -central daemon, deterministic self-stabilizing
                 bootstrap of colors up to distance {\em k\/} is
                 possible provided that {\em k\/} -local topology can be
                 instantaneously obtained, and ({\em ii\/}) under the
                 distributed daemon, probabilistic self-stabilizing
                 bootstrap is possible for any range.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "8",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
  keywords =     "anonymous networks; daemon; stabilization; topology",
}

@Article{Souissi:2009:UEC,
  author =       "Samia Souissi and Xavier D{\'e}fago and Masafumi
                 Yamashita",
  title =        "Using eventually consistent compasses to gather
                 memory-less mobile robots with limited visibility",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "4",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "9:1--9:??",
  month =        jan,
  year =         "2009",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1462187.1462196",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Fri Apr 24 17:35:49 MDT 2009",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "Reaching agreement among a set of mobile robots is one
                 of the most fundamental issues in distributed robotic
                 systems. This problem is often illustrated by the
                 gathering problem, where the robots must self-organize
                 and meet at some location not determined in advance,
                 and without the help of some global coordinate system.
                 While very simple to express, this problem has the
                 advantage of retaining the inherent difficulty of
                 agreement, namely the question of breaking symmetry
                 between robots. In previous works, it has been proved
                 that the gathering problem is solvable in asynchronous
                 model with oblivious (i.e., memory-less) robots and
                 limited visibility, as long as the robots share the
                 knowledge of some direction, as provided by a compass.
                 However, the problem has no solution in the
                 semi-synchronous model when robots do not share a
                 compass, or when they cannot detect
                 multiplicity.\par

                 In this article, we define a model in which compasses
                 may be unreliable, and study the solvability of
                 gathering oblivious mobile robots with limited
                 visibility in the semi-synchronous model. In
                 particular, we give an algorithm that solves the
                 problem in finite time in a system where compasses are
                 unstable for some arbitrary long periods, provided that
                 they stabilize eventually. In addition, we show that
                 our algorithm solves the gathering problem for at most
                 three robots in the asynchronous model. Our algorithm
                 is intrinsically self-stabilizing.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "9",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
  keywords =     "autonomous mobile robots; cooperation and control;
                 point formation; self-organizing robots;
                 self-stabilization; unreliable compasses",
}

@Article{Mansour:2009:IPC,
  author =       "Mohamed S. Mansour and Karsten Schwan and Sameh
                 Abdelaziz",
  title =        "Isolation points: Creating performance-robust
                 enterprise systems",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "4",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "10:1--10:??",
  month =        may,
  year =         "2009",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1516533.1516534",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Tue Mar 16 18:45:56 MDT 2010",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "This article explores a performance isolation-based
                 approach to creating robust distributed applications.
                 For each application, the approach is to understand the
                 performance dependencies that pervade it and then
                 impose constraints on the possible `spread' of such
                 dependencies through the application. The mechanisms
                 used for this purpose, termed isolation points, are
                 software abstractions inserted at key program
                 locations: (1) in application interfaces, (2) in
                 middleware implementations for making remote requests,
                 and (3) in the system interfaces used by middleware and
                 applications. This article demonstrates the utility of
                 isolation points by using them to implement higher
                 level abstractions that improve the
                 performance-robustness of representative enterprise
                 applications. The I-Queue abstraction uses isolation
                 points to implement performance-robust messaging,
                 targeting the message queues used in distributed
                 enterprise codes. By appropriately orchestrating
                 message dispatching, I-Queue can achieve an improvement
                 of 16--32\% in dispatched message locality based on
                 traces obtained from the large-scale e-Pricing{\reg}
                 search engine operated by Worldspan L.P.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "10",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
  keywords =     "Autonomic computing; dynamic behavior; performance
                 isolation",
}

@Article{Araujo:2009:UMR,
  author =       "Ricardo M. Araujo and Luis C. Lamb",
  title =        "On the use of memory and resources in minority games",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "4",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "11:1--11:??",
  month =        may,
  year =         "2009",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1516533.1516535",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Tue Mar 16 18:45:56 MDT 2010",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "The use of resources in multiagent learning systems is
                 a relevant research problem, with a number of
                 applications in resource allocation, communication and
                 synchronization. Multiagent distributed resource
                 allocation requires that agents act on limited,
                 localized information with minimum communication
                 overhead in order to optimize the distribution of
                 available resources. When requirements and constraints
                 are dynamic, learning agents may be needed to allow for
                 adaptation. One way of accomplishing learning is to
                 observe past outcomes, using such information to
                 improve future decisions. When limits in agents' memory
                 or observation capabilities are assumed, one must
                 decide on how large should the observation window be.
                 We investigate how this decision influences both
                 agents' and system's performance in the context of a
                 special class of distributed resource allocation
                 problems, namely dispersion games. We show by using
                 several numerical experiments over a specific
                 dispersion game (the Minority Game) that in such
                 scenario an agent's performance is non-monotonically
                 correlated with her memory size when all other agents
                 are kept unchanged. We then provide an
                 information-theoretic explanation for the observed
                 behaviors, showing that a downward causation effect
                 takes place.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "11",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
  keywords =     "Dispersion games; mechanism design; multiagent
                 learning; multiagent systems",
}

@Article{Fujii:2009:SBC,
  author =       "Keita Fujii and Tatsuya Suda",
  title =        "Semantics-based context-aware dynamic service
                 composition",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "4",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "12:1--12:??",
  month =        may,
  year =         "2009",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1516533.1516536",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Tue Mar 16 18:45:56 MDT 2010",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "This article presents a semantics-based context-aware
                 dynamic service composition framework that composes an
                 application through combining distributed components
                 based on the semantics of components and contexts of
                 users. The proposed framework consists of Component
                 Service Model with Semantics (CoSMoS), Component
                 Runtime Environment (CoRE), and Semantic Graph based
                 Service Composition (SeGSeC). CoSMoS models the
                 semantics of components and contexts of users. CoRE is
                 a middleware to support CoSMoS on various distributed
                 computing technologies. SeGSeC is a mechanism to
                 compose an application by synthesizing its workflow
                 based on the semantics of components and contexts of
                 users. The proposed framework is capable of composing
                 applications requested in a natural language by
                 leveraging the semantic information of components. The
                 proposed framework composes applications differently to
                 individual users based on their contexts and
                 preferences. The proposed framework acquires user
                 preferences from user-specified rules and also via
                 learning. The proposed framework also adapts to dynamic
                 environments by autonomously composing a new
                 application upon detecting context change. This article
                 describes the design and mechanism of the proposed
                 framework, and also presents simulation experiments to
                 evaluate the proposed framework.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "12",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
  keywords =     "context-aware; Dynamic service composition; semantics;
                 service oriented framework",
}

@Article{Alyfantis:2009:EUL,
  author =       "George Alyfantis and Stathes Hadjiefthymiades and
                 Lazaros Merakos",
  title =        "Exploiting user location for load balancing {WLANs}
                 and improving wireless {QoS}",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "4",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "13:1--13:??",
  month =        may,
  year =         "2009",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1516533.1516537",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Tue Mar 16 18:45:56 MDT 2010",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "A ``Smart Spaces System'', called MITOS, for improved
                 user connectivity in large wireless LAN installations
                 is proposed. MITOS extends the scope of resource
                 management to the dynamic relocation of nomadic users:
                 the system suggests to a user the best location to move
                 to for obtaining a satisfactory quality of service
                 level, when the controlling access point of its current
                 location becomes congested. The system monitors the
                 traffic and user location across the network, and
                 formulates the appropriate relocation proposal urging
                 specific users to move to better locations at
                 reasonable distances. Two enhancements to the basic
                 MITOS system are introduced for maintaining an almost
                 uniform load level across the considered
                 infrastructure: the first uses microeconomic concepts,
                 while the second borrows game theoretic mechanisms from
                 the Santa Fe Bar problem. Simulation results on the
                 efficiency of the proposed schemes are provided.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "13",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
  keywords =     "Auctions; game theory; microeconomics; mobile
                 computing; pervasive computing; Sante Fe bar problem;
                 wireless communications",
}

@Article{Salehie:2009:SAS,
  author =       "Mazeiar Salehie and Ladan Tahvildari",
  title =        "Self-adaptive software: Landscape and research
                 challenges",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "4",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "14:1--14:??",
  month =        may,
  year =         "2009",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1516533.1516538",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Tue Mar 16 18:45:56 MDT 2010",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "Software systems dealing with distributed applications
                 in changing environments normally require human
                 supervision to continue operation in all conditions.
                 These (re-)configuring, troubleshooting, and in general
                 maintenance tasks lead to costly and time-consuming
                 procedures during the operating phase. These problems
                 are primarily due to the open-loop structure often
                 followed in software development. Therefore, there is a
                 high demand for management complexity reduction,
                 management automation, robustness, and achieving all of
                 the desired quality requirements within a reasonable
                 cost and time range during operation. Self-adaptive
                 software is a response to these demands; it is a
                 closed-loop system with a feedback loop aiming to
                 adjust itself to changes during its operation. These
                 changes may stem from the software system's {\em
                 self\/} (internal causes, e.g., failure) or {\em
                 context\/} (external events, e.g., increasing requests
                 from users). Such a system is required to {\em
                 monitor\/} itself and its context, {\em detect\/}
                 significant changes, {\em decide\/} how to react, and
                 {\em act\/} to execute such decisions. These processes
                 depend on adaptation properties (called self-*
                 properties), domain characteristics (context
                 information or models), and preferences of
                 stakeholders. Noting these requirements, it is widely
                 believed that new models and frameworks are needed to
                 design self-adaptive software. This survey article
                 presents a taxonomy, based on concerns of adaptation,
                 that is, {\em how}, {\em what}, {\em when\/} and {\em
                 where}, towards providing a unified view of this
                 emerging area. Moreover, as adaptive systems are
                 encountered in many disciplines, it is imperative to
                 learn from the theories and models developed in these
                 other areas. This survey article presents a landscape
                 of research in self-adaptive software by highlighting
                 relevant disciplines and some prominent research
                 projects. This landscape helps to identify the
                 underlying research gaps and elaborates on the
                 corresponding challenges.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "14",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
  keywords =     "Adaptation processes; research challenges;
                 self-adaptive software; self-properties; survey",
}

@Article{Lemmon:2009:ISI,
  author =       "Michael Lemmon and Christian Poellabauer and Liqiang
                 Zhang and Xiaobo Zhou",
  title =        "Introduction to the special issue on self-adaptive and
                 self-organizing wireless networking systems",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "4",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "15:1--15:??",
  month =        jul,
  year =         "2009",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1552297.1552298",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Tue Mar 16 18:46:16 MDT 2010",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "15",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Fok:2009:AMA,
  author =       "Chien-Liang Fok and Gruia-Catalin Roman and Chenyang
                 Lu",
  title =        "{Agilla}: a mobile agent middleware for
                 self-adaptive wireless sensor networks",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "4",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "16:1--16:??",
  month =        jul,
  year =         "2009",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1552297.1552299",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Tue Mar 16 18:46:16 MDT 2010",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "This article presents Agilla, a mobile agent
                 middleware designed to support self-adaptive
                 applications in wireless sensor networks. Agilla
                 provides a programming model in which applications
                 consist of evolving communities of agents that share a
                 wireless sensor network. Coordination among the agents
                 and access to physical resources are supported by a
                 tuple space abstraction. Agents can dynamically enter
                 and exit a network and can autonomously clone and
                 migrate themselves in response to environmental
                 changes. Agilla's ability to support self-adaptive
                 applications in wireless sensor networks has been
                 demonstrated in the context of several applications,
                 including fire detection and tracking, monitoring cargo
                 containers, and robot navigation. Agilla, the first
                 mobile agent system to operate in resource-constrained
                 wireless sensor platforms, was implemented on top of
                 TinyOS. Agilla's feasibility and efficiency was
                 demonstrated by experimental evaluation on two physical
                 testbeds consisting of Mica2 and TelosB nodes.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "16",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
  keywords =     "Agent; middleware; mobile agent; wireless sensor
                 network",
}

@Article{Gilbert:2009:SSR,
  author =       "Seth Gilbert and Nancy Lynch and Sayan Mitra and Tina
                 Nolte",
  title =        "Self-stabilizing robot formations over unreliable
                 networks",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "4",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "17:1--17:??",
  month =        jul,
  year =         "2009",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1552297.1552300",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Tue Mar 16 18:46:16 MDT 2010",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "We describe how a set of mobile robots can arrange
                 themselves on any specified curve on the plane in the
                 presence of dynamic changes both in the underlying ad
                 hoc network and in the set of participating robots. Our
                 strategy is for the mobile robots to implement a {\em
                 self-stabilizing virtual layer\/} consisting of mobile
                 client nodes, stationary Virtual Nodes (VNs), and local
                 broadcast communication. The VNs are associated with
                 predetermined regions in the plane and coordinate among
                 themselves to distribute the client nodes relatively
                 uniformly among the VNs' regions. Each VN directs its
                 local client nodes to align themselves on the local
                 portion of the target curve. The resulting motion
                 coordination protocol is self-stabilizing, in that each
                 robot can begin the execution in any arbitrary state
                 and at any arbitrary location in the plane. In
                 addition, self-stabilization ensures that the robots
                 can adapt to changes in the desired target formation.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "17",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
  keywords =     "cooperative mobile robotics; distributed algorithms;
                 Formal methods; pattern formation; replicated state
                 machines; self-stabilization",
}

@Article{Zhang:2009:CSD,
  author =       "Hongwei Zhang and Lifeng Sang and Anish Arora",
  title =        "On the convergence and stability of data-driven link
                 estimation and routing in sensor networks",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "4",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "18:1--18:??",
  month =        jul,
  year =         "2009",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1552297.1552301",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Tue Mar 16 18:46:16 MDT 2010",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "The wireless network community has become increasingly
                 aware of the benefits of data-driven link estimation
                 and routing as compared with beacon-based approaches,
                 but the issue of {\em Biased Link Sampling\/} (BLS)
                 estimation has not been well studied even though it
                 affects routing convergence in the presence of network
                 and environment dynamics. Focusing on traffic-induced
                 dynamics, we examine the open, unexplored question of
                 how serious the BLS issue is and how to effectively
                 address it when the routing metric ETX is used. For a
                 wide range of traffic patterns and network topologies
                 and using both node-oriented and network-wide analysis
                 and experimentation, we discover that the optimal
                 routing structure remains quite stable even though the
                 properties of individual links and routes vary
                 significantly as traffic pattern changes. In cases
                 where the optimal routing structure does change,
                 data-driven link estimation and routing is either
                 guaranteed to converge to the optimal structure or
                 empirically shown to converge to a close-to-optimal
                 structure. These findings provide the foundation for
                 addressing the BLS issue in the presence of
                 traffic-induced dynamics and suggest approaches other
                 than existing ones. These findings also demonstrate
                 that it is possible to maintain an optimal, stable
                 routing structure despite the fact that the properties
                 of individual links and paths vary in response to
                 network dynamics.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "18",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
  keywords =     "biased link sampling; convergence; data-driven link
                 estimation and routing; stability; Wireless sensor
                 networks",
}

@Article{Wang:2009:SOF,
  author =       "Yu Wang and Lijuan Cao and Teresa A. Dahlberg and Fan
                 Li and Xinghua Shi",
  title =        "Self-organizing fault-tolerant topology control in
                 large-scale three-dimensional wireless networks",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "4",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "19:1--19:??",
  month =        jul,
  year =         "2009",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1552297.1552302",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Tue Mar 16 18:46:16 MDT 2010",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "Topology control protocol aims to efficiently adjust
                 the network topology of wireless networks in a
                 self-adaptive fashion to improve the performance and
                 scalability of networks. This is especially essential
                 to large-scale multihop wireless networks (e.g.,
                 wireless sensor networks). Fault-tolerant topology
                 control has been studied recently. In order to achieve
                 both sparseness (i.e., the number of links is linear
                 with the number of nodes) and fault tolerance (i.e.,
                 can survive certain level of node/link failures),
                 different geometric topologies were proposed and used
                 as the underlying network topologies for wireless
                 networks. However, most of the existing topology
                 control algorithms can only be applied to
                 two-dimensional (2D) networks where all nodes are
                 distributed in a 2D plane. In practice, wireless
                 networks may be deployed in three-dimensional (3D)
                 space, such as under water wireless sensor networks in
                 ocean or mobile ad hoc networks among space shuttles in
                 space. This article seeks to investigate
                 self-organizing fault-tolerant topology control
                 protocols for large-scale 3D wireless networks. Our new
                 protocols not only guarantee {\em k\/} -connectivity of
                 the network, but also ensure the bounded node degree
                 and constant power stretch factor even under {\em k\/}
                 -1 node failures. All of our proposed protocols are
                 localized algorithms, which only use one-hop neighbor
                 information and constant messages with small time
                 complexity. Thus, it is easy to update the topology
                 efficiently and self-adaptively for large-scale dynamic
                 networks. Our simulation confirms our theoretical
                 proofs for all proposed 3D topologies.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "19",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
  keywords =     "fault tolerance; power efficiency; Three-dimensional
                 wireless networks; topology control",
}

@Article{Vasilakos:2009:ESI,
  author =       "Athanasios V. Vasilakos and Witold Pedrycz",
  title =        "Editorial to the special issue",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "4",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "20:1--20:??",
  month =        nov,
  year =         "2009",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1636665.1636666",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Tue Mar 16 18:46:37 MDT 2010",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "20",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Anastasopoulos:2009:AFR,
  author =       "Markos P. Anastasopoulos and Athanasios V. Vasilakos
                 and Panayotis G. Cottis",
  title =        "An autonomic framework for reliable multicast: {A}
                 game theoretical approach based on social psychology",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "4",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "21:1--21:??",
  month =        nov,
  year =         "2009",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1636665.1636667",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Tue Mar 16 18:46:37 MDT 2010",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "A major challenge in wireless terrestrial networks is
                 to provide large-scale reliable multicast and broadcast
                 services. The main problem limiting the scalability of
                 such networks is feedback implosion, a problem arising
                 when a large number of users transmit their feedback
                 messages through the network, occupying a significant
                 portion of system resources.\par

                 Inspired by social psychology, specifically from the
                 bystander effect phenomenon, an autonomic framework for
                 large-scale reliable multicast services is presented.
                 The self-configuring and self-optimizing procedures of
                 the proposed autonomic scheme are modeled using game
                 theory. Through appropriate modeling and simulations of
                 the proposed scheme carried out to evaluate its
                 performance, it is found that the new approach
                 suppresses feedback messages very effectively, while at
                 the same time, it does not degrade the timely data
                 transfer.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "21",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
  keywords =     "Autonomic communication; autonomic manager; bystander
                 effect; feedback suppression; game theory; Nash
                 equilibrium; reliable multicast; WiMax networks",
}

@Article{Lee:2009:IIA,
  author =       "Chonho Lee and Junichi Suzuki",
  title =        "An immunologically-inspired autonomic framework for
                 self-organizing and evolvable network applications",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "4",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "22:1--22:??",
  month =        nov,
  year =         "2009",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1636665.1636668",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Tue Mar 16 18:46:37 MDT 2010",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "Network applications are increasingly required to be
                 autonomous, scalable, adaptive to dynamic changes in
                 the network, and survivable against partial system
                 failures. Based on the observation that various
                 biological systems have already satisfied these
                 requirements, this article proposes and evaluates a
                 biologically-inspired framework that makes network
                 applications to be autonomous, scalable, adaptive, and
                 survivable. With the proposed framework, called iNet,
                 each network application is designed as a decentralized
                 group of software agents, analogous to a bee colony
                 (application) consisting of multiple bees (agents).
                 Each agent provides a particular functionality of a
                 network application, and implements biological
                 behaviors such as reproduction, migration, energy
                 exchange, and death. iNet is designed after the
                 mechanisms behind how the immune system detects
                 antigens (e.g., viruses) and produces specific
                 antibodies to eliminate them. It models a set of
                 environment conditions (e.g., network traffic and
                 resource availability) as an antigen and an agent
                 behavior (e.g., migration) as an antibody. iNet allows
                 each agent to autonomously sense its surrounding
                 environment conditions (an antigen) to evaluate whether
                 it adapts well to the sensed environment, and if it
                 does not, adaptively perform a behavior (an antibody)
                 suitable for the environment conditions. In iNet, a
                 configuration of antibodies is encoded as a set of
                 genes, and antibodies evolve via genetic operations
                 such as crossover and mutation. Empirical measurement
                 results show that iNet is lightweight enough.
                 Simulation results show that agents adapt to dynamic
                 and heterogeneous network environments by evolving
                 their antibodies across generations. The results also
                 show that iNet allows agents to scale to workload
                 volume and network size and to survive partial link
                 failures in the network.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "22",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
  keywords =     "artificial immune systems; Autonomic networking;
                 biologically-inspired networking; evolvable network
                 applications",
}

@Article{Xu:2009:MLD,
  author =       "Bo Xu and Ouri Wolfson and Channah Naiman",
  title =        "Machine learning in disruption-tolerant {MANETs}",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "4",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "23:1--23:??",
  month =        nov,
  year =         "2009",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1636665.1636669",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Tue Mar 16 18:46:37 MDT 2010",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "In this article we study the data dissemination
                 problem in which data items are flooded to all the
                 moving objects in a mobile ad hoc network by
                 peer-to-peer transfer. We show that if memory and
                 bandwidth are bounded at moving objects, then the
                 problem of determining whether a set of data items can
                 be disseminated to all the moving objects is
                 NP-complete. For a heuristic solution we postulate that
                 a moving object should save and transmit the data items
                 that are most likely to be new (i.e., previously
                 unknown) to future encountered moving objects. We
                 propose a method to be used by each moving object to
                 prioritize data items based on their probabilities of
                 being new to future receivers. The method employs a
                 machine learning system for estimation of the novelty
                 probability and the machine learning system is
                 progressively trained by received data items. Through
                 simulations based on real mobility traces, we show the
                 superiority of the method against some natural
                 alternatives.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "23",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
  keywords =     "mobile ad hoc networks; Mobile data management; mobile
                 peer-to-peer networks; publish/subscribe; resource
                 discovery",
}

@Article{Zhang:2009:MAA,
  author =       "Zonghua Zhang and Hong Shen",
  title =        "{M-AID}: An adaptive middleware built upon anomaly
                 detectors for intrusion detection and rational
                 response",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "4",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "24:1--24:??",
  month =        nov,
  year =         "2009",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1636665.1636670",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Tue Mar 16 18:46:37 MDT 2010",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "Anomaly-based intrusion detection is about the
                 discrimination of malicious and legitimate behaviors on
                 the basis of the characterization of system normality
                 in terms of particular observable subjects. As the
                 system normality is constructed solely from an observed
                 sample of normally occurring patterns, anomaly
                 detectors always suffer excessive false alerts.
                 Adaptability is therefore a desirable feature that
                 enables an anomaly detector to alleviate, if not
                 eliminate, such annoyance. To achieve that, we either
                 design self-learning anomaly detectors to capture the
                 drifts of system normality or develop postprocessing
                 mechanisms to deal with the outputs. As the former
                 methodology is usually scenario- and
                 application-specific, in this article, we focus on the
                 latter one. In particular, our design starts from three
                 key observations: (1) most of anomaly detectors are
                 threshold based and parametric, that is, configurable
                 by a set of parameters; (2) anomaly detectors differ in
                 operational environment and operational capability in
                 terms of detection coverage and blind spots; (3) an
                 intrusive anomaly may leave traces across multiple
                 system layers, incurring different observable events of
                 interest. Firstly, we present a statistical framework
                 to formally characterize and analyze the basic
                 behaviors of anomaly detectors by examining the
                 properties of their operational environments. The
                 framework then serves as a theoretical basis for
                 developing an adaptive middleware, which is called
                 M-AID, to optimally integrate a number of
                 observation-specific parameterizable anomaly detectors.
                 Specifically, M-AID treats these fine-grained anomaly
                 detectors as a whole and casts their collective
                 behaviors in a framework which is formulated as a
                 Multiagent Partially Observable Markov Decision Process
                 (MPO-MDP). The generic anomaly detection models of
                 M-AID are thus automatically inferred via a
                 reinforcement learning algorithm which dynamically
                 adjusts the behaviors of anomaly detectors in
                 accordance with a reward signal that is defined and
                 quantified by a suit of evaluation metrics.
                 Fundamentally, the distributed and autonomous
                 architecture enables M-AID to be scalable, dependable,
                 and adaptable, and the reward signal allows security
                 administrators to specify cost factors and take into
                 account the operational context for taking rational
                 response. Finally, a host-based prototype of M-AID is
                 developed, along with comprehensive experimental
                 evaluation and comparative studies.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "24",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
  keywords =     "Anomaly detection; intrusion detection; network
                 security; POMDP; security metrics; security policy",
}

@Article{Anonymous:2009:TR,
  author =       "Anonymous",
  title =        "{TAAS} reviewers 2009",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "4",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "25:1--25:??",
  month =        nov,
  year =         "2009",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1636665.1636671",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Tue Mar 16 18:46:37 MDT 2010",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "25",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Wang:2010:PSO,
  author =       "Yu-Xuan Wang and Qiao-Liang Xiang and Zhen-Dong
                 Zhao",
  title =        "Particle swarm optimizer with adaptive tabu and
                 mutation: a unified framework for efficient mutation
                 operators",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "5",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "1:1--1:??",
  month =        feb,
  year =         "2010",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1671948.1671949",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Tue Mar 16 18:46:54 MDT 2010",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "Evolutionary Algorithms (EAs) and Swarm Intelligence
                 (SI) are widely used to tackle black-box global
                 optimization problems when no prior knowledge is
                 available. In order to increase search diversity and
                 avoid stagnation in local optima, the mutation operator
                 was introduced and has been extensively studied in EAs
                 and SI-based algorithms. However, the performance after
                 introducing mutation can be affected in many aspects
                 and the parameters used to perform mutations are very
                 hard to determine. For the purpose of developing
                 efficient mutation operators, this article proposes a
                 unified tabu and mutation framework with parameter
                 adaptations in the context of the Particle Swarm
                 Optimizer (PSO). The proposed framework is a
                 significant extension of our preliminary work [Wang et
                 al. 2007]. Empirical studies on 25 benchmark functions
                 indicate that under the proposed framework: (1)
                 excellent performance can be achieved even with a small
                 number of mutations; (2) the derived algorithm
                 consistently performs well on diverse types of problems
                 and overall performance even surpasses the
                 state-of-the-art PSO variants and representative
                 mutation-based EAs; and (3) fast convergence rates can
                 be preserved despite the use of a long jump mutation
                 operator (the Cauchy mutation).",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "1",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
  keywords =     "evolutionary algorithm; Global optimization; mutation
                 operator; parameter adaptation; swarm intelligence",
}

@Article{Girdzijauskas:2010:SOH,
  author =       "{\v{S}}ar{\=u}nas Girdzijauskas and Anwitaman Datta
                 and Karl Aberer",
  title =        "Structured overlay for heterogeneous environments:
                 Design and evaluation of {Oscar}",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "5",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "2:1--2:??",
  month =        feb,
  year =         "2010",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1671948.1671950",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Tue Mar 16 18:46:54 MDT 2010",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "Recent years have seen advances in building large
                 Internet-scale index structures, generally known as
                 {\em structured overlays}. Early structured overlays
                 realized distributed hash tables (DHTs) which are ill
                 suited for anything but exact queries. The need to
                 support range queries necessitates systems that can
                 handle uneven load distributions. However such systems
                 suffer from practical problems --- including poor
                 latency, disproportionate bandwidth usage at
                 participating peers, or unrealistic assumptions on
                 peers' homogeneity, in terms of available storage or
                 bandwidth resources. In this article we consider a
                 system that is not only able to support uneven load
                 distributions but also to operate in heterogeneous
                 environments, where each peer can autonomously decide
                 how much of its resources to contribute to the system.
                 We provide the theoretical foundations of realizing
                 such a network and present a newly proposed system
                 Oscar based on these principles. Oscar can construct
                 efficient overlays given arbitrary load distributions
                 by employing a novel scalable network sampling
                 technique. The simulations of our system validate the
                 theory and evaluate Oscar's performance under typical
                 challenges, encountered in real-life large-scale
                 networked systems, including participant heterogeneity,
                 faults, and skewed and dynamic load-distributions. Thus
                 the Oscar distributed index fills in an important gap
                 in the family of structured overlays, bringing into
                 life a practical Internet-scale index, which can play a
                 crucial role in enabling data-oriented applications
                 distributed over wide-area networks.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "2",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
  keywords =     "Peer-to-peer systems; routing; skewed key
                 distributions; small-world graphs; structured
                 overlays",
}

@Article{Weyns:2010:MMC,
  author =       "Danny Weyns and Robrecht Haesevoets and Alexander
                 Helleboogh and Tom Holvoet and Wouter Joosen",
  title =        "The {MACODO} middleware for context-driven dynamic
                 agent organizations",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "5",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "3:1--3:??",
  month =        feb,
  year =         "2010",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1671948.1671951",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Tue Mar 16 18:46:54 MDT 2010",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "One of the major challenges in engineering distributed
                 multiagent systems is the coordination necessary to
                 align the behavior of different agents.
                 Decentralization of control implies a style of
                 coordination in which the agents cooperate as peers
                 with respect to each other and no agent has global
                 control over the system, or global knowledge about the
                 system. The dynamic interactions and collaborations
                 among agents are usually structured and managed by
                 means of roles and organizations. In existing
                 approaches agents typically have a dual responsibility:
                 on the one hand playing roles within the organization,
                 on the other hand managing the life-cycle of the
                 organization itself, for example, setting up the
                 organization and managing organization dynamics.
                 Engineering realistic multiagent systems in which
                 agents encapsulate this dual responsibility is a
                 complex task.\par

                 In this article, we present a middleware for
                 context-driven dynamic agent organizations. The
                 middleware is part of an integrated approach, called
                 MACODO: Middleware Architecture for COntext-driven
                 Dynamic agent Organizations. The complementary part of
                 the MACODO approach is an organization model that
                 defines abstractions to support application developers
                 in describing dynamic organizations, as described in
                 Weyns et al. [2010].\par

                 The MACODO middleware offers the life-cycle management
                 of dynamic organizations as a reusable service
                 separated from the agents, which makes it easier to
                 understand, design, and manage dynamic organizations in
                 multiagent systems. We give a detailed description of
                 the software architecture of the MADOCO middleware. The
                 software architecture describes the essential building
                 blocks of a distributed middleware platform that
                 supports the MACODO organization model. We used the
                 middleware architecture to develop a prototype
                 middleware platform for a traffic monitoring
                 application. We evaluate the MACODO middleware
                 architecture by assessing the adaptability,
                 scalability, and robustness of the prototype
                 platform.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "3",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
  keywords =     "Context; middleware; organization; role; software
                 architecture",
}

@Article{Allen:2010:CTS,
  author =       "Stuart M. Allen and Gualtiero Colombo and Roger M.
                 Whitaker",
  title =        "Cooperation through self-similar social networks",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "5",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "4:1--4:??",
  month =        feb,
  year =         "2010",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1671948.1671952",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Tue Mar 16 18:46:54 MDT 2010",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "We address the problem of cooperation in decentralized
                 systems, specifically looking at interactions between
                 independent pairs of peers where mutual exchange of
                 resources (e.g., updating or sharing content) is
                 required. In the absence of any enforcement mechanism
                 or protocol, there is no incentive for one party to
                 directly reciprocate during a transaction with another.
                 Consequently, for such decentralized systems to
                 function, protocols for self-organization need to
                 explicitly promote cooperation in a manner where
                 adherence to the protocol is incentivized.\par

                 In this article we introduce a new generic model to
                 achieve this. The model is based on peers repeatedly
                 interacting to build up and maintain a dynamic social
                 network of others that they can trust based on
                 similarity of cooperation. This mechanism effectively
                 incentivizes unselfish behavior, where peers with
                 higher levels of cooperation gain higher payoff. We
                 examine the model's behavior and robustness in detail.
                 This includes the effect of peers self-adapting their
                 cooperation level in response to maximizing their
                 payoff, representing a Nash-equilibrium of the system.
                 The study shows that the formation of a social network
                 based on reflexive cooperation levels can be a highly
                 effective and robust incentive mechanism for autonomous
                 decentralized systems.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "4",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
  keywords =     "Cooperation; decentralized systems;
                 self-organization",
}

@Article{Loia:2010:ESI,
  author =       "Vincenzo Loia and Athanasios V. Vasilakos",
  title =        "Editorial: Special issue on ambient intelligence",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "5",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "5:1--5:??",
  month =        may,
  year =         "2010",
  CODEN =        "????",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Sat Aug 14 15:39:17 MDT 2010",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "5",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Herrmann:2010:SOS,
  author =       "Klaus Herrmann",
  title =        "Self-organized service placement in ambient
                 intelligence environments",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "5",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "6:1--6:??",
  month =        may,
  year =         "2010",
  CODEN =        "????",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Sat Aug 14 15:39:17 MDT 2010",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "6",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Duman:2010:MSB,
  author =       "Hakan Duman and Hani Hagras and Victor Callaghan",
  title =        "A multi-society-based intelligent association
                 discovery and selection for ambient intelligence
                 environments",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "5",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "7:1--7:??",
  month =        may,
  year =         "2010",
  CODEN =        "????",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Sat Aug 14 15:39:17 MDT 2010",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "7",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Acampora:2010:IAF,
  author =       "Giovanni Acampora and Matteo Gaeta and Vincenzo Loia
                 and Athanasios V. Vasilakos",
  title =        "Interoperable and adaptive fuzzy services for ambient
                 intelligence applications",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "5",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "8:1--8:??",
  month =        may,
  year =         "2010",
  CODEN =        "????",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Sat Aug 14 15:39:17 MDT 2010",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "8",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Wurtz:2010:ESI,
  author =       "Rolf P. W{\"u}rtz and Kirstie L. Bellman and Hartmut
                 Schmeck and Christian Igel",
  title =        "Editorial: Special issue on organic computing",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "5",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "9:1--9:??",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2010",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1837909.1837910",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Fri Oct 8 18:23:39 MDT 2010",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "9",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Schmeck:2010:ASO,
  author =       "Hartmut Schmeck and Christian M{\"u}ller-Schloer and
                 Emre {\c{C}}akar and Moez Mnif and Urban Richter",
  title =        "Adaptivity and self-organization in organic computing
                 systems",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "5",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "10:1--10:??",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2010",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1837909.1837911",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Fri Oct 8 18:23:39 MDT 2010",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "Organic Computing (OC) and other research initiatives
                 like Autonomic Computing or Proactive Computing have
                 developed the vision of systems possessing life-like
                 properties: they self-organize, adapt to their
                 dynamically changing environments, and establish other
                 so-called self-x properties, like self-healing,
                 self-configuration, self-optimization, etc. What we are
                 searching for in OC are methodologies and concepts for
                 systems that allow to cope with increasingly complex
                 networked application systems by introduction of self-x
                 properties and at the same time guarantee a trustworthy
                 and adaptive response to externally provided system
                 objectives and control actions. Therefore, in OC, we
                 talk about {\em controlled
                 self-organization}.\par

                 Although the terms {\em self-organization\/} and {\em
                 adaptivity\/} have been discussed for years, we miss a
                 clear definition of self-organization in most
                 publications, which have a technically motivated
                 background.\par

                 In this article, we briefly summarize the state of the
                 art and suggest a characterization of (controlled)
                 self-organization and adaptivity that is motivated by
                 the main objectives of the OC initiative. We present a
                 system classification of robust, adaptable, and
                 adaptive systems and define a degree of autonomy to be
                 able to quantify how autonomously a system is working.
                 The degree of autonomy distinguishes and measures
                 external control that is exerted directly by the user
                 ({\em no autonomy\/}) from internal control of a system
                 which might be fully controlled by an
                 observer/controller architecture that is part of the
                 system ({\em full autonomy\/}). The quantitative degree
                 of autonomy provides the basis for characterizing the
                 notion of controlled self-organization. Furthermore, we
                 discuss several alternatives for the design of organic
                 systems.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "10",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
  keywords =     "Adaptation; adaptivity; observer/controller
                 architecture; organic computing; robustness;
                 self-organization; system classification",
}

@Article{Fekete:2010:EWC,
  author =       "S{\'a}ndor P. Fekete and Christiane Schmidt and Axel
                 Wegener and Horst Hellbr{\"u}ck and Stefan Fischer",
  title =        "Empowered by wireless communication: Distributed
                 methods for self-organizing traffic collectives",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "5",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "11:1--11:??",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2010",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1837909.1837912",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Fri Oct 8 18:23:39 MDT 2010",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "In recent years, tremendous progress has been made in
                 understanding the dynamics of vehicle traffic flow and
                 traffic congestion by interpreting traffic as a
                 multiparticle system. This helps to explain the onset
                 and persistence of many undesired phenomena, for
                 example, traffic jams. It also reflects the apparent
                 helplessness of drivers in traffic, who feel like
                 passive particles that are pushed around by exterior
                 forces; one of the crucial aspects is the inability to
                 communicate and coordinate with other traffic
                 participants.\par

                 We present distributed methods for solving these
                 fundamental problems, employing modern wireless,
                 ad-hoc, multi-hop networks. The underlying idea is to
                 use these capabilities as the basis for self-organizing
                 methods for coordinating data collection and
                 processing, recognizing traffic phenomena, and changing
                 their structure by coordinated behavior. The overall
                 objective is a multi-level approach that reaches from
                 protocols for local wireless communication, data
                 dissemination, pattern recognition, over hierarchical
                 structuring and coordinated behavior, all the way to
                 large-scale traffic regulation.\par

                 In this article, we describe three types of results:
                 (i) self-organizing and distributed methods for
                 maintaining and collecting data (using our concept of
                 {\em Hovering Data Clouds\/}); (ii) adaptive data
                 dissemination for traffic information systems; (iii)
                 methods for self-recognition of traffic jams. We
                 conclude by describing higher-level aspects of our
                 work.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "11",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
  keywords =     "Hovering Data Clouds; Organic computing; Organic
                 Information Complexes; pattern recognition;
                 self-organizing systems; traffic; traffic jams",
}

@Article{Grushin:2010:PRG,
  author =       "Alexander Grushin and James A. Reggia",
  title =        "Parsimonious rule generation for a nature-inspired
                 approach to self-assembly",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "5",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "12:1--12:??",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2010",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1837909.1837913",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Fri Oct 8 18:23:39 MDT 2010",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "Most construction of artificial, multicomponent
                 structures is based upon an external entity that
                 directs the assembly process, usually following a
                 script/blueprint under centralized control. In
                 contrast, recent research has focused increasingly on
                 an alternative paradigm, inspired largely by the nest
                 building behavior of social insects, in which
                 components ``self-assemble'' into a given target
                 structure. Adapting such a nature-inspired approach to
                 precisely self-assemble artificial structures (bridge,
                 building, etc.) presents a formidable challenge: one
                 must create a set of local control rules to direct the
                 behavior of the individual components/agents during the
                 self-assembly process. In recent work, we developed a
                 fully automated procedure that generates such rules,
                 allowing a given structure to successfully
                 self-assemble in a simulated environment having
                 constrained, continuous motion; however, the resulting
                 rule sets were typically quite large. In this article,
                 we present a more effective methodology for automatic
                 rule generation, which makes an attempt to
                 parsimoniously capture both the repeating patterns that
                 exist within a structure, and the behaviors necessary
                 for appropriate coordination. We then empirically show
                 that the procedure developed here generates sets of
                 rules that are not only correct, but significantly
                 reduced in size, relative to our earlier approach. Such
                 rule sets allow for simpler agents that are nonetheless
                 still capable of performing complex tasks, and
                 therefore demonstrate the problem-solving potential of
                 self-organized systems.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "12",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
  keywords =     "Coordination; parsimony; self-assembly;
                 self-organization; stigmergy; swarm intelligence",
}

@Article{Marin-Perianu:2010:AVC,
  author =       "Mihai Marin-Perianu and Stephan Bosch and Raluca
                 Marin-Perianu and Hans Scholten and Paul Havinga",
  title =        "Autonomous vehicle coordination with wireless sensor
                 and actuator networks",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "5",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "13:1--13:??",
  month =        nov,
  year =         "2010",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/1867713.1867714",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Tue Nov 23 11:15:24 MST 2010",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "13",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Wang:2010:EBT,
  author =       "Yonghong Wang and Munindar P. Singh",
  title =        "Evidence-based trust: a mathematical model geared
                 for multiagent systems",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "5",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "14:1--14:??",
  month =        nov,
  year =         "2010",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/1867713.1867715",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Tue Nov 23 11:15:24 MST 2010",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "14",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Chen:2010:SOM,
  author =       "Gang Chen and Abdolhossein Sarrafzadeh and Chor Ping
                 Low and Liang Zhang",
  title =        "A self-organization mechanism based on cross-entropy
                 method for {P2P}-like applications",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "5",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "15:1--15:??",
  month =        nov,
  year =         "2010",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/1867713.1867716",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Tue Nov 23 11:15:24 MST 2010",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "15",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Weyns:2010:MOM,
  author =       "Danny Weyns and Robrecht Haesevoets and Alexander
                 Helleboogh",
  title =        "The {MACODO} organization model for context-driven
                 dynamic agent organizations",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "5",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "16:1--16:??",
  month =        nov,
  year =         "2010",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/1867713.1867717",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Tue Nov 23 11:15:24 MST 2010",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "16",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Bakhouya:2011:SIA,
  author =       "Mohamed Bakhouya",
  title =        "Special Issue: Adaptive Service Discovery and
                 Composition in Ubiquitous and Pervasive Computing",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "6",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "1:1--1:??",
  month =        feb,
  year =         "2011",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/1921641.1921642",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Mon Mar 28 11:33:10 MDT 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "1",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Chen:2011:DIA,
  author =       "Shyr-Kuen Chen and Pi-Chung Wang",
  title =        "Design and Implementation of an Anycast Services
                 Discovery in Mobile Ad Hoc Networks",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "6",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "2:1--2:??",
  month =        feb,
  year =         "2011",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/1921641.1921643",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Mon Mar 28 11:33:10 MDT 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "2",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Duan:2011:NSD,
  author =       "Qiang Duan",
  title =        "Network Service Description and Discovery for
                 High-Performance Ubiquitous and Pervasive Grids",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "6",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "3:1--3:??",
  month =        feb,
  year =         "2011",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/1921641.1921644",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Mon Mar 28 11:33:10 MDT 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "3",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Mukhtar:2011:DUT,
  author =       "Hamid Mukhtar and Djamel Bela{\"\i}d and Guy
                 Bernard",
  title =        "Dynamic User Task Composition Based on User
                 Preferences",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "6",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "4:1--4:??",
  month =        feb,
  year =         "2011",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/1921641.1921645",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Mon Mar 28 11:33:10 MDT 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "4",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Hang:2011:TSS,
  author =       "Chung-Wei Hang and Munindar P. Singh",
  title =        "Trustworthy Service Selection and Composition",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "6",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "5:1--5:??",
  month =        feb,
  year =         "2011",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/1921641.1921646",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Mon Mar 28 11:33:10 MDT 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "5",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Flores:2011:SMF,
  author =       "Carlos Flores and Paul Grace and Gordon S. Blair",
  title =        "{SeDiM}: a Middleware Framework for Interoperable
                 Service Discovery in Heterogeneous Networks",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "6",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "6:1--6:??",
  month =        feb,
  year =         "2011",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/1921641.1921647",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Mon Mar 28 11:33:10 MDT 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "6",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Al-Oqily:2011:DSO,
  author =       "Ibrahim Al-Oqily and Ahmed Karmouch",
  title =        "A Decentralized Self-Organizing Service Composition
                 for Autonomic Entities",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "6",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "7:1--7:??",
  month =        feb,
  year =         "2011",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/1921641.1921648",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Mon Mar 28 11:33:10 MDT 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "7",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Bourcier:2011:AAM,
  author =       "Johann Bourcier and Ada Diaconescu and Philippe
                 Lalanda and Julie A. McCann",
  title =        "{AutoHome}: An Autonomic Management Framework for
                 Pervasive Home Applications",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "6",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "8:1--8:??",
  month =        feb,
  year =         "2011",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/1921641.1921649",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Mon Mar 28 11:33:10 MDT 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "8",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Coronato:2011:FSV,
  author =       "Antonio Coronato and Giuseppe {De Pietro}",
  title =        "Formal Specification and Verification of Ubiquitous
                 and Pervasive Systems",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "6",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "9:1--9:??",
  month =        feb,
  year =         "2011",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/1921641.1921650",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Mon Mar 28 11:33:10 MDT 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "9",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Gaber:2011:ASA,
  author =       "Jaafar Gaber",
  title =        "Action Selection Algorithms for Autonomous System in
                 Pervasive Environment: a Computational Approach",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "6",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "10:1--10:??",
  month =        feb,
  year =         "2011",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/1921641.1921651",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Mon Mar 28 11:33:10 MDT 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "10",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Beal:2011:SCD,
  author =       "Jacob Beal and Olivier Michel and Ulrik Pagh
                 Schultz",
  title =        "Spatial Computing: Distributed Systems That Take
                 Advantage of Our Geometric World",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "6",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "11:1--11:??",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2011",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/1968513.1968514",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Fri Jul 22 08:44:20 MDT 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "11",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Maignan:2011:GGA,
  author =       "Luidnel Maignan and Fr{\'e}d{\'e}ric Gruau",
  title =        "{Gabriel} Graphs in Arbitrary Metric Space and their
                 Cellular Automaton for Many Grids",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "6",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "12:1--12:??",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2011",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/1968513.1968515",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Fri Jul 22 08:44:20 MDT 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "12",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{DeRosa:2011:DLD,
  author =       "Michael {De Rosa} and Seth Copen Goldstein and Peter
                 Lee and Jason Campbell and Padmanabhan S. Pillai",
  title =        "Detecting Locally Distributed Predicates",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "6",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "13:1--13:??",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2011",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/1968513.1968516",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Fri Jul 22 08:44:20 MDT 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "13",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Viroli:2011:SCP,
  author =       "Mirko Viroli and Matteo Casadei and Sara Montagna and
                 Franco Zambonelli",
  title =        "Spatial Coordination of Pervasive Services through
                 Chemical-Inspired Tuple Spaces",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "6",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "14:1--14:??",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2011",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/1968513.1968517",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Fri Jul 22 08:44:20 MDT 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "14",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Fernandez-Marquez:2011:ISS,
  author =       "Jose Luis Fernandez-Marquez and Giovanna Di Marzo
                 Serugendo and Josep Lluis Arcos",
  title =        "Infrastructureless Spatial Storage Algorithms",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "6",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "15:1--15:??",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2011",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/1968513.1968518",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Fri Jul 22 08:44:20 MDT 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "15",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Mamei:2011:MPS,
  author =       "Marco Mamei",
  title =        "Macro Programming a Spatial Computer with {Bayesian}
                 Networks",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "6",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "16:1--16:??",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2011",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/1968513.1968519",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Fri Jul 22 08:44:20 MDT 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "16",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Delorimier:2011:SHI,
  author =       "Michael Delorimier and Nachiket Kapre and Nikil Mehta
                 and Andr{\'e} Dehon",
  title =        "Spatial hardware implementation for sparse graph
                 algorithms in {GraphStep}",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "6",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "17:1--17:??",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2011",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2019583.2019584",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Sun Nov 6 06:17:58 MST 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "17",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{White:2011:SSD,
  author =       "Jules White and Brian Dougherty and Chris Thompson and
                 Douglas C. Schmidt",
  title =        "{ScatterD}: Spatial deployment optimization with
                 hybrid heuristic\slash evolutionary algorithms",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "6",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "18:1--18:??",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2011",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2019583.2019585",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Sun Nov 6 06:17:58 MST 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "18",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Pei:2011:SOS,
  author =       "Guanhong Pei and Binoy Ravindran and E. Douglas
                 Jensen",
  title =        "Self-organizing and self-reconfigurable event routing
                 in ad hoc networks with causal dependency awareness",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "6",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "19:1--19:??",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2011",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2019583.2019586",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Sun Nov 6 06:17:58 MST 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "19",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Tacconi:2011:CES,
  author =       "David Tacconi and Daniele Miorandi and Iacopo Carreras
                 and Francesco De Pellegrini and Imrich Chlamtac",
  title =        "Cooperative evolution of services in ubiquitous
                 computing environments",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "6",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "20:1--20:??",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2011",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2019583.2019587",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Sun Nov 6 06:17:58 MST 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "20",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Phithakkitnukoon:2011:BBA,
  author =       "Santi Phithakkitnukoon and Ram Dantu and Rob Claxton
                 and Nathan Eagle",
  title =        "Behavior-based adaptive call predictor",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "6",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "21:1--21:??",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2011",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2019583.2019588",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Sun Nov 6 06:17:58 MST 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "21",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Xiong:2011:APA,
  author =       "Naixue Xiong and Athanasios V. Vasilakos and Laurence
                 T. Yang and Ekram Hossain",
  title =        "An adaptive and predictive approach for autonomic
                 multirate multicast networks",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "6",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "22:1--22:??",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2011",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2019583.2019589",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Sun Nov 6 06:17:58 MST 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "22",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Bonnet:2011:PAO,
  author =       "Fran{\c{c}}ois Bonnet and Michel Raynal",
  title =        "The Price of Anonymity: Optimal Consensus Despite
                 Asynchrony, Crash, and Anonymity",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "6",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "23:1--23:??",
  month =        oct,
  year =         "2011",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2019591.2019592",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Sun Nov 6 06:17:59 MST 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "23",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Vu:2011:EUC,
  author =       "Le-Hung Vu and Karl Aberer",
  title =        "Effective Usage of Computational Trust Models in
                 Rational Environments",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "6",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "24:1--24:??",
  month =        oct,
  year =         "2011",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2019591.2019593",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Sun Nov 6 06:17:59 MST 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "24",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Misra:2011:BFI,
  author =       "Sudip Misra and Gopidi Rajesh",
  title =        "Bird Flight-Inspired Routing Protocol for Mobile Ad
                 Hoc Networks",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "6",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "25:1--25:??",
  month =        oct,
  year =         "2011",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2019591.2019594",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Sun Nov 6 06:17:59 MST 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "25",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Xiao:2011:PIC,
  author =       "Yang Xiao and Yanping Zhang and Xiannuan Liang",
  title =        "Primate-Inspired Communication Methods for Mobile and
                 Static Sensors and {RFID} Tags",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "6",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "26:1--26:??",
  month =        oct,
  year =         "2011",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2019591.2019595",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Sun Nov 6 06:17:59 MST 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "26",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Jelasity:2011:SSM,
  author =       "M{\'a}rk Jelasity and Vilmos Bilicki",
  title =        "Scalable Stealth Mode {P2P} Overlays of Very Small
                 Constant Degree",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "6",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "27:1--27:??",
  month =        oct,
  year =         "2011",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2019591.2019596",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Sun Nov 6 06:17:59 MST 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "27",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Bouchenak:2011:ASS,
  author =       "Sara Bouchenak and Fabienne Boyer and Benoit Claudel
                 and Noel De Palma and Olivier Gruber and Sylvain Sicard",
  title =        "From Autonomic to Self-Self Behaviors: The {JADE}
                 Experience",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "6",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "28:1--28:??",
  month =        oct,
  year =         "2011",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2019591.2019597",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Sun Nov 6 06:17:59 MST 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "28",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Parashar:2011:E,
  author =       "Manish Parashar and Franco Zambonelli",
  title =        "Editorial",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "6",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "29:1--29:??",
  month =        oct,
  year =         "2011",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2019591.2019598",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Sun Nov 6 06:17:59 MST 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "29",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Kota:2012:DAS,
  author =       "Ramachandra Kota and Nicholas Gibbins and Nicholas R.
                 Jennings",
  title =        "Decentralized approaches for self-adaptation in agent
                 organizations",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "7",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "1:1--1:??",
  month =        apr,
  year =         "2012",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2168260.2168261",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Tue Nov 6 19:20:29 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "Self-organizing multi-agent systems provide a suitable
                 paradigm for developing autonomic computing systems
                 that manage themselves. Towards this goal, we
                 demonstrate a robust, decentralized approach for
                 structural adaptation in explicitly modeled problem
                 solving agent organizations. Based on self-organization
                 principles, our method enables the autonomous agents to
                 modify their structural relations to achieve a better
                 allocation of tasks in a simulated task-solving
                 environment. Specifically, the agents reason about when
                 and how to adapt using only their history of
                 interactions as guidance. We empirically show that, in
                 a wide range of closed, open, static, and dynamic
                 scenarios, the performance of organizations using our
                 method is close (70-90\%) to that of an idealized
                 centralized allocation method and is considerably
                 better (10-60\%) than the current state-of-the-art
                 decentralized approaches.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "1",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Bicocchi:2012:SOV,
  author =       "Nicola Bicocchi and Marco Mamei and Franco
                 Zambonelli",
  title =        "Self-organizing virtual macro sensors",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "7",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "2:1--2:??",
  month =        apr,
  year =         "2012",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2168260.2168262",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Tue Nov 6 19:20:29 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "The future large-scale deployment of pervasive sensor
                 network infrastructures calls for mechanisms enabling
                 the extraction of general-purpose data at limited
                 energy costs. The approach presented in this article
                 relies on a simple algorithm to let a sensor network
                 self-organize a virtual partitioning in correspondence
                 to spatial regions characterized by similar sensing
                 patterns, and to let distributed aggregation of
                 sensorial data take place on a per-region basis. The
                 result of this process is that a sensor network can be
                 modeled as a collection of virtual macro sensors, each
                 associated to a well-characterized region of the
                 physical environment. Within each region, each physical
                 sensor has the local availability of aggregated data
                 about its region and is able to act as an access point
                 to such data. This feature promises to be very suitable
                 for a number of emerging usage scenarios. Our approach
                 is described and evaluated in both a simulation
                 environment and a real test bed, and quantitatively
                 compared with related works in the area. Current
                 limitations and areas of future development are also
                 discussed.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "2",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Dashti:2012:EOF,
  author =       "Mohammad Torabi Dashti",
  title =        "Efficiency of optimistic fair exchange using trusted
                 devices",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "7",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "3:1--3:??",
  month =        apr,
  year =         "2012",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2168260.2168263",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Tue Nov 6 19:20:29 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "Efficiency of asynchronous optimistic fair exchange
                 using trusted devices is studied. It is shown that
                 three messages in the optimistic subprotocol are
                 sufficient and necessary for exchanging idempotent
                 items. When exchanging nonidempotent items, however,
                 three messages in the optimistic subprotocol are
                 sufficient only under the assumption that trusted
                 devices have unbounded storage capacity. This
                 assumption is often not satisfiable in practice. It is
                 then proved that exchanging nonidempotent items using
                 trusted devices with a bounded storage capacity
                 requires exactly four messages in the optimistic
                 subprotocol.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "3",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Saffre:2012:HST,
  author =       "Fabrice Saffre and Aistis Simaitis",
  title =        "Host selection through collective decision",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "7",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "4:1--4:??",
  month =        apr,
  year =         "2012",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2168260.2168264",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Tue Nov 6 19:20:29 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "In this article, we present a collective
                 decision-making framework inspired by biological swarms
                 and capable of supporting the emergence of a consensus
                 within a population of agents in the absence of
                 environment-mediated communication (stigmergy).
                 Instead, amplification is the result of the variation
                 of a confidence index, stored in individual memory and
                 providing each agent with a statistical estimate of the
                 current popularity of its preferred choice within the
                 whole population. We explore the fundamental properties
                 of our framework using a combination of analytical and
                 numerical methods. We then use Monte Carlo simulation
                 to investigate its applicability to host selection in
                 the presence of multiple alternatives, a problem found
                 in application migration scenarios. The advantages of
                 self-organization and the use of statistically
                 predictive methods in this context are also
                 discussed.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "4",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Gounaris:2012:ELB,
  author =       "Anastasios Gounaris and Christos A. Yfoulis and Norman
                 W. Paton",
  title =        "Efficient load balancing in partitioned queries under
                 random perturbations",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "7",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "5:1--5:??",
  month =        apr,
  year =         "2012",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2168260.2168265",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Tue Nov 6 19:20:29 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "This work investigates a particular instance of the
                 problem of designing efficient adaptive systems, under
                 the condition that each adaptation decision incurs some
                 nonnegligible cost when enacted. More specifically, we
                 deal with the problem of dynamic, intraquery load
                 balancing in parallel database queries across
                 heterogeneous nodes in a way that takes into account
                 the inherent cost of adaptations and thus avoids both
                 overreacting and deciding when to adapt in a completely
                 heuristic manner. The latter may lead to serious
                 performance degradation in several cases, such as
                 periodic and random imbalances. We follow a control
                 theoretical approach to this problem; more
                 specifically, we propose a multiple-input
                 multiple-output feedback linear quadratic regulation
                 (LQR) controller, which captures the tradeoff between
                 reaching a balanced state and the cost inherent in such
                 adaptations. Our approach, apart from benefitting from
                 and being characterized by a solid theoretical
                 foundation, exhibits better performance than
                 state-of-the-art heuristics in realistic situations, as
                 verified by thorough evaluation.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "5",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Bakhouya:2012:ISS,
  author =       "Mohamed Bakhouya and Roy Campbell and Antonio Coronato
                 and Giuseppe de Pietro and Anand Ranganathan",
  title =        "Introduction to special section on formal methods in
                 pervasive computing",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "7",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "6:1--6:??",
  month =        apr,
  year =         "2012",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2168260.2168266",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Tue Nov 6 19:20:29 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "Ubiquitous and pervasive applications may present
                 critical requirements from the point of view of
                 functional correctness, reliability, availability,
                 security, and safety. Unlike traditional
                 safety-critical applications, the behavior of
                 ubiquitous and pervasive applications is affected by
                 the movements and location of users and resources. In
                 this article, we first present emerging formal methods
                 for the description of both entities and their behavior
                 in pervasive computing environments; then, we introduce
                 this special issue. Despite many previous works that
                 have focused on modeling the entities, relatively few
                 have concentrated on modeling or verifying behaviors;
                 and almost none has dealt with combining techniques
                 proposed in these two aspects. The articles accepted in
                 this special issue cover some of the topics
                 aforementioned and constitute a representative sample
                 of the latest development of formal methods in
                 pervasive computing environments.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "6",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Popescu:2012:FTD,
  author =       "Razvan Popescu and Athanasios Staikopoulos and Antonio
                 Brogi and Peng Liu and Siobh{\'a}n Clarke",
  title =        "A formalized, taxonomy-driven approach to cross-layer
                 application adaptation",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "7",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "7:1--7:??",
  month =        apr,
  year =         "2012",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2168260.2168267",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Tue Nov 6 19:20:29 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "Advances in pervasive technology have made it possible
                 to consider large-scale application types that
                 potentially span heterogeneous organizations,
                 technologies, and device types. This class of
                 application will have a multilayer architecture, where
                 each layer is likely to use languages and technologies
                 appropriate to its own concerns. An example application
                 is a geographically large-scale crisis management
                 system. Typically, such applications are required to
                 dynamically adapt their behavior based on current
                 circumstances, with adaptations potentially affecting
                 all layers of the application. The complexities
                 involved in dynamically adapting multilayer
                 applications will significantly benefit from formal
                 approaches to its specification. This article presents
                 a new methodology for flexible, multilayer application
                 adaptation, with layer-specific adaptation solution
                 templates bound to application mismatches that are
                 organized into hierarchical taxonomies. Templates can
                 be linked either through direct invocations or through
                 adaptation events, supporting flexible cross-layer
                 adaptation. The methodology illustrates the use of
                 different formalisms for different elements of its
                 specification. In particular, we combine semiformal
                 metamodeling techniques for the system model
                 specification with formal Petri nets, which are used to
                 capture template matchmaking using reachability
                 analysis. This work demonstrates how existing
                 formalisms can be used for the specification of a
                 generic adaptation model for pervasive applications.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "7",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Weyns:2012:FUR,
  author =       "Danny Weyns and Sam Malek and Jesper Andersson",
  title =        "{FORMS}: Unifying reference model for formal
                 specification of distributed self-adaptive systems",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "7",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "8:1--8:??",
  month =        apr,
  year =         "2012",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2168260.2168268",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Tue Nov 6 19:20:29 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "The challenges of pervasive and mobile computing
                 environments, which are highly dynamic and
                 unpredictable, have motivated the development of
                 self-adaptive software systems. Although noteworthy
                 successes have been achieved on many fronts, the
                 construction of such systems remains significantly more
                 challenging than traditional systems. We argue this is
                 partially because researchers and practitioners have
                 been struggling with the lack of a precise vocabulary
                 for describing and reasoning about the key
                 architectural characteristics of self-adaptive systems.
                 Further exacerbating the situation is the fact that
                 existing frameworks and guidelines do not provide an
                 encompassing perspective of the different types of
                 concerns in this setting. In this article, we present a
                 comprehensive reference model, entitled FOrmal
                 Reference Model for Self-adaptation (FORMS), that
                 targets both issues. FORMS provides rigor in the manner
                 such systems can be described and reasoned about. It
                 consists of a small number of formally specified
                 modeling elements that correspond to the key concerns
                 in the design of self-adaptive software systems, and a
                 set of relationships that guide their composition. We
                 demonstrate FORMS's ability to precisely describe and
                 reason about the architectural characteristics of
                 distributed self-adaptive software systems through its
                 application to several existing systems. FORMS's
                 expressive power gives it a potential for documenting
                 reusable architectural solutions (e.g., architectural
                 patterns) to commonly encountered problems in this
                 area.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "8",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Zambonelli:2012:ISS,
  author =       "Franco Zambonelli and Ben Paechter",
  title =        "Introduction to the special section on pervasive
                 adaptation",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "7",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "9:1--9:??",
  month =        apr,
  year =         "2012",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2168260.2168269",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Tue Nov 6 19:20:29 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "9",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Handte:2012:SSA,
  author =       "Marcus Handte and Gregor Schiele and Verena Matjuntke
                 and Christian Becker and Pedro Jos{\'e} Marr{\'o}n",
  title =        "{3PC}: System support for adaptive peer-to-peer
                 pervasive computing",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "7",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "10:1--10:??",
  month =        apr,
  year =         "2012",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2168260.2168270",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Tue Nov 6 19:20:29 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "A major characteristic of pervasive computing
                 applications is their ability to adapt themselves to
                 changing execution environments and physical contexts.
                 In this article, we analyze different kinds of
                 adaptations and introduce a multidimensional
                 classification for them. On this basis, we propose a
                 novel approach for peer-to-peer-based pervasive
                 computing that provides support for the identified
                 classes and integrates them in a multilevel
                 architecture. We give a comprehensive overview of this
                 architecture and its current realization in the
                 Peer-to-Peer Pervasive Computing (3PC) project,
                 discussing what adaptation is realized on each level,
                 how the levels interact with each other, and how the
                 overall system benefits from the integrated treatment
                 of adaptation.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "10",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Dusparic:2012:AMP,
  author =       "Ivana Dusparic and Vinny Cahill",
  title =        "Autonomic multi-policy optimization in pervasive
                 systems: Overview and evaluation",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "7",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "11:1--11:??",
  month =        apr,
  year =         "2012",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2168260.2168271",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Tue Nov 6 19:20:29 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "This article describes Distributed W-Learning (DWL), a
                 reinforcement learning-based algorithm for
                 collaborative agent-based optimization of pervasive
                 systems. DWL supports optimization towards multiple
                 heterogeneous policies and addresses the challenges
                 arising from the heterogeneity of the agents that are
                 charged with implementing them. DWL learns and exploits
                 the dependencies between agents and between policies to
                 improve overall system performance. Instead of always
                 executing the locally-best action, agents learn how
                 their actions affect their immediate neighbors and
                 execute actions suggested by neighboring agents if
                 their importance exceeds the local action's importance
                 when scaled using a predefined or learned collaboration
                 coefficient. We have evaluated DWL in a simulation of
                 an Urban Traffic Control (UTC) system, a canonical
                 example of the large-scale pervasive systems that we
                 are addressing. We show that DWL outperforms widely
                 deployed fixed-time and simple adaptive UTC controllers
                 under a variety of traffic loads and patterns. Our
                 results also confirm that enabling collaboration
                 between agents is beneficial as is the ability for
                 agents to learn the degree to which it is appropriate
                 for them to collaborate. These results suggest that DWL
                 is a suitable basis for optimization in other
                 large-scale systems with similar characteristics.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "11",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Serbedzija:2012:RPS,
  author =       "Nikola Serbedzija and Stephen Fairclough",
  title =        "Reflective pervasive systems",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "7",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "12:1--12:??",
  month =        apr,
  year =         "2012",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2168260.2168272",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Tue Nov 6 19:20:29 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "Pervasive adaptive systems are concerned with the
                 construction of ``smart'' technologies capable of
                 adapting to the needs of the individual in real time.
                 In order to achieve this level of specificity, systems
                 must be capable of monitoring the psychological status
                 of the user and responding to these changes in real
                 time and across multiple systems if necessary. This
                 article describes a number of conceptual issues
                 associated with this category of adaptive technology.
                 The biocybernetic loop describes different approaches
                 to monitoring the status of the user from physiological
                 sensors to overt behavior. These data are used to drive
                 real time system adaptation tailored to a specific user
                 in a particular context. The rate at which the
                 technology adapts to the individual user are described
                 over three different phases of usage: awareness
                 (short-term), adjustment (medium-term), and coevolution
                 (long-term). An ontology is then proposed for the
                 development of an adaptive software architecture that
                 embodies this approach and may be extended to encompass
                 several distinct loops working in parallel. The
                 feasibility of the approach is assessed through
                 implemented case studies of their performance and
                 functionality.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "12",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Bouchachia:2012:ISS,
  author =       "Abdelhamid Bouchachia and Nadia Nedjah",
  title =        "Introduction to the special section on self-adaptive
                 systems: Models and algorithms",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "7",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "13:1--13:??",
  month =        apr,
  year =         "2012",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2168260.2168273",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Tue Nov 6 19:20:29 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "13",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Loureiro:2012:DOC,
  author =       "Emerson Loureiro and Paddy Nixon and Simon Dobson",
  title =        "Decentralized and optimal control of shared resource
                 pools",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "7",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "14:1--14:??",
  month =        apr,
  year =         "2012",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2168260.2168274",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Tue Nov 6 19:20:29 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "Resource pools are collections of computational
                 resources (e.g., servers) which can be used by
                 different applications in a shared way. A crucial
                 aspect in these pools is to allocate resources so as to
                 ensure their proper usage, taking into account workload
                 and specific requirements of each application. An
                 interesting approach, in this context, is to allocate
                 the resources in the best possible way, aiming at
                 optimal resource usage. Workload, however, varies over
                 time, and in turn, resource demands will vary too. To
                 ensure that optimal resource usage is always in place,
                 resource shares should be defined dynamically and over
                 time. It has been claimed that utility functions are
                 the main tool for enabling such self-optimizing
                 behavior. Whereas many solutions with this
                 characteristic have been proposed to date, none of them
                 presents true decentralization within the context of
                 shared pools. In this article, we then propose a
                 decentralized model for optimal resource usage in
                 shared resource pools, providing practical and
                 theoretical evidence of its feasibility.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "14",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Guo:2012:MFS,
  author =       "Hongliang Guo and Yaochu Jin and Yan Meng",
  title =        "A morphogenetic framework for self-organized
                 multirobot pattern formation and boundary coverage",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "7",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "15:1--15:??",
  month =        apr,
  year =         "2012",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2168260.2168275",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Tue Nov 6 19:20:29 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "Embryonic development of multicellular organisms, also
                 known as morphogenesis, is regarded as a robust
                 self-organization process for pattern generation.
                 Inspired by the recent findings in biology indicating
                 that morphogen gradients, together with a Gene
                 Regulatory Network (GRN), play a key role in biological
                 patterning, we propose a framework for self-organized
                 multirobot pattern formation and boundary coverage
                 based on an artificial GRN model. The proposed
                 framework does not need a global coordinate system,
                 which makes it more practical to be implemented in a
                 physical robotic system. Moreover, an adaptation
                 mechanism is included in the framework so that the
                 self-organization algorithm is robust to changes in the
                 number of robots. Various case studies of multirobot
                 pattern formation and boundary coverage show the
                 effectiveness of the framework.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "15",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Fisch:2012:TKA,
  author =       "Dominik Fisch and Dominik Fisch and Martin J{\"a}nicke
                 and Edgar Kalkowski and Bernhard Sick",
  title =        "Techniques for knowledge acquisition in dynamically
                 changing environments",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "7",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "16:1--16:??",
  month =        apr,
  year =         "2012",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2168260.2168276",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Tue Nov 6 19:20:29 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "Intelligent agents often have the same or similar
                 tasks and sometimes they cooperate to solve a given
                 problem. These agents typically know how to observe
                 their local environment and how to react on certain
                 observations, for instance, and this knowledge may be
                 represented in form of rules. However, many
                 environments are dynamic in the sense that from time to
                 time novel rules are required or old rules become
                 obsolete. In this article we propose and investigate
                 new techniques for knowledge acquisition by novelty
                 detection and reaction as well as obsoleteness
                 detection and reaction that an agent may use for
                 self-adaptation to new situations. For that purpose we
                 consider classifiers based on probabilistic rules.
                 Premises of new rules are learned autonomously while
                 conclusions are either obtained from human experts or
                 from other agents which have learned appropriate rules
                 in the past. By means of knowledge exchange, agents
                 will efficiently be enabled to cope with situations
                 they were not confronted with before. This kind of
                 collaborative intelligence follows the human archetype:
                 Humans are able to learn from each other by
                 communicating learned rules. We demonstrate some
                 properties of the knowledge acquisition techniques
                 using artificial data as well as data from the field of
                 intrusion detection.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "16",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Wang:2012:MCS,
  author =       "Yufeng Wang and Akihiro Nakao and Athanasios V.
                 Vasilakos",
  title =        "On modeling of coevolution of strategies and structure
                 in autonomous overlay networks",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "7",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "17:1--17:??",
  month =        jul,
  year =         "2012",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2240166.2240167",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Tue Nov 6 19:20:32 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "Currently, on one hand, there exist much work about
                 network formation and/or growth models, and on the
                 other hand, cooperative strategy evolutions are
                 extensively investigated in biological, economic, and
                 social systems. Generally, overlay networks are
                 heterogeneous, dynamic, and distributed environments
                 managed by multiple administrative authorities, shared
                 by users with different and competing interests, or
                 even autonomously provided by independent and rational
                 users. Thus, the structure of a whole overlay network
                 and the peers' rational strategies are ever coevolving.
                 However, there are very few approaches that
                 theoretically investigate the coevolution between
                 network structure and individual rational behaviors.
                 The main motivation of our article lies in that: Unlike
                 existing work which empirically illustrates the
                 interaction between rational strategies and network
                 structure (through simulations), based on EGT
                 (Evolutionary Game Theory), we not only infer a
                 condition that could favor the cooperative strategy
                 over defect strategy, but also theoretically
                 characterizes the structural properties of the formed
                 network. Specifically, our contributions are twofold.
                 First, we strictly derive the critical benefit-to-cost
                 ratio ( b / c ) that would facilitate the evolution of
                 cooperation. The critical ratio depends on the network
                 structure (the number of peers in system and the
                 average degree of each peer), and the evolutionary rule
                 (the strategy and linking mutation probabilities).
                 Then, according to the evolutionary rules, we formally
                 derive the structural properties of the formed network
                 in full cooperative state. Especially, the degree
                 distribution is compatible with the power-law, and the
                 exponent is (4-3 v )/(1-3 v ), where v is peer's
                 linking mutation probability. Furthermore, we show
                 that, without being harmful to cooperation evolution, a
                 slight change of the evolutionary rule will evolve the
                 network into a small-world structure (high global
                 efficiency and average clustering coefficient), with
                 the same power-law degree distribution as in the
                 original evolution model.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "17",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Dixit:2012:ASA,
  author =       "M{\^o}nica Dixit and Ant{\'o}nio Casimiro and Paolo
                 Lollini and Andrea Bondavalli and Paulo Verissimo",
  title =        "Adaptare: Supporting automatic and dependable
                 adaptation in dynamic environments",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "7",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "18:1--18:??",
  month =        jul,
  year =         "2012",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2240166.2240168",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Tue Nov 6 19:20:32 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "Distributed protocols executing in uncertain
                 environments, like the Internet or ambient computing
                 systems, should dynamically adapt to environment
                 changes in order to preserve Quality of Service (QoS).
                 In earlier work, it was shown that QoS adaptation
                 should be dependable, if correctness of protocol
                 properties is to be maintained. More recently, some
                 ideas concerning specific strategies and methodologies
                 for improving QoS adaptation have been proposed. In
                 this article we describe Adaptare, a complete framework
                 for dependable QoS adaptation. We assume that during
                 its lifetime, a system alternates periods where its
                 temporal behavior is well characterized, with
                 transition periods during which a variation of the
                 environment conditions occurs. Our method is based on
                 the following: if the environment is generically
                 characterized in analytical terms, and we can detect
                 the alternation of these stable and transient phases,
                 we can improve the effectiveness and dependability of
                 QoS adaptation. To prove our point we provide detailed
                 evaluation results of the proposed solutions. Our
                 evaluation is based on synthetic data flows generated
                 from probabilistic distributions, as well as on real
                 data traces collected in various Internet-based
                 environments. We compare our solution with other
                 approaches and we show that Adaptare, albeit more
                 complex, is very effective, allowing protocols to adapt
                 to the available resources in a dependable way.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "18",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Combi:2012:CMF,
  author =       "Carlo Combi and Matteo Gozzi and Roberto Posenato and
                 Giuseppe Pozzi",
  title =        "Conceptual modeling of flexible temporal workflows",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "7",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "19:1--19:??",
  month =        jul,
  year =         "2012",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2240166.2240169",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Tue Nov 6 19:20:32 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "Workflow technology has emerged as one of the leading
                 technologies in modeling, redesigning, and executing
                 business processes. The management of temporal aspects
                 in the definition of a workflow process has been
                 considered only recently in the literature. Currently
                 available Workflow Management Systems ( WfMS ) and
                 research prototypes offer a very limited support for
                 the definition, detection, and management of temporal
                 constraints over business processes. In this article,
                 we propose a new advanced workflow conceptual model for
                 expressing time constraints in business processes and
                 we present a general technique to check different
                 levels of temporal consistency for workflow schemata at
                 process design time: since a time constraint can be
                 satisfied in different ways, we propose a
                 classification of temporal workflows according to the
                 way time constraints are satisfied. Such classification
                 can be used to successfully manage flexible workflows
                 at runtime.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "19",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Ali:2012:IDE,
  author =       "Musrrat Ali and Millie Pant and Ajith Abraham",
  title =        "Improving differential evolution algorithm by
                 synergizing different improvement mechanisms",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "7",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "20:1--20:??",
  month =        jul,
  year =         "2012",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2240166.2240170",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Tue Nov 6 19:20:32 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "Differential Evolution (DE) is a well-known
                 Evolutionary Algorithm (EA) for solving global
                 optimization problems. Practical experiences, however,
                 show that DE is vulnerable to problems like slow and/or
                 premature convergence. In this article we propose a
                 simple and modified DE framework, called MDE, which is
                 a fusion of three recent modifications in DE: (1)
                 Opposition-Based Learning (OBL); (2) tournament method
                 for mutation; and (3) single population structure.
                 These features have a specific role which helps in
                 improving the performance of DE. While OBL helps in
                 giving a good initial start to DE, the use of the
                 tournament best base vector in the mutation phase helps
                 in preserving the diversity. Finally the single
                 population structure helps in faster convergence. Their
                 synergized effect balances the exploitation and
                 exploration capabilities of DE without compromising
                 with the solution quality or the convergence rate. The
                 proposed MDE is validated on a set of 25 standard
                 benchmark problems, 7 nontraditional shifted benchmark
                 functions proposed at the special session of CEC2008,
                 and three engineering design problems. Numerical
                 results and statistical analysis show that the proposed
                 MDE is better than or at least comparable to the basic
                 DE and several other state-of-the art DE variants.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "20",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Zhang:2012:CDT,
  author =       "Kai Zhang and Emmanuel G. {Collins, Jr.} and Dongqing
                 Shi",
  title =        "Centralized and distributed task allocation in
                 multi-robot teams via a stochastic clustering auction",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "7",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "21:1--21:??",
  month =        jul,
  year =         "2012",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2240166.2240171",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Tue Nov 6 19:20:32 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "This article considers the problem of optimal task
                 allocation for heterogeneous teams, for example, teams
                 of heterogeneous robots or human-robot teams. It is
                 well-known that this problem is NP-hard and hence
                 computationally feasible approaches must develop an
                 approximate solution. Here, we propose a solution via a
                 Stochastic Clustering Auction (SCA) that uses a Markov
                 chain search process along with simulated annealing.
                 This is the first stochastic auction method used in
                 conjunction with global optimization. It is based on
                 stochastic transfer and swap moves between the clusters
                 of tasks assigned to the various robots and considers
                 not only downhill movements, but also uphill movements,
                 which can avoid local minima. A novel feature of this
                 algorithm is that, by tuning the annealing suite and
                 turning the uphill movements on and off, the global
                 team performance after algorithm convergence can slide
                 in the region between the global optimal performance
                 and the performance associated with a random
                 allocation. Extensive numerical experiments are used to
                 evaluate the performance of SCA in terms of costs and
                 computational and communication requirements. For
                 centralized auctioning, the SCA algorithm is compared
                 to fast greedy auction algorithms. Distributed
                 auctioning is then compared with centralized SCA.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "21",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Mense:2012:ERE,
  author =       "Mario Mense and Christian Schindelhauer",
  title =        "An erasure-resilient encoding system for flexible
                 reading and writing in storage networks",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "7",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "22:1--22:??",
  month =        jul,
  year =         "2012",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2240166.2240172",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Tue Nov 6 19:20:32 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "We introduce the Read-Write-Coding-System (RWC), a
                 very flexible class of linear block codes that generate
                 efficient and flexible erasure codes for storage
                 networks. In particular, given a message x of k symbols
                 and a codeword y of n symbols, an RW code defines
                 additional parameters k{$<$}= r,w{$<$}= n that offer
                 enhanced possibilities to adjust the fault-tolerance
                 capability of the code. More precisely, an RWC provides
                 linear (n,r,d) -codes that have: (a) minimum (Hamming)
                 distance d = n-r+1 for any two codewords, and (b) for
                 any codeword y$_1$ there exists a codeword y$_2$ with
                 distance of at most w. Furthermore, depending on the
                 values r,w and the code alphabet, different block codes
                 such as parity codes (e.g., RAID 4/5) or Reed--Solomon
                 (RS) codes (if r = k and thus, w = n ) can be
                 generated. In storage networks in which I/O accesses
                 are very costly and redundancy is crucial, this
                 flexibility has considerable advantages as r and w can
                 optimally be adapted to read or write intensive
                 applications; only w symbols must be updated if the
                 message x changes completely, which is different from
                 other codes that always need to rewrite y completely as
                 x changes. In this article, we first state a tight
                 lower bound and basic conditions for all RW codes.
                 Furthermore, we introduce special RW codes in which all
                 mentioned parameters are adjustable even online, that
                 is, RW codes which are adaptive to changing demands. At
                 last, we investigate the question for which choices of
                 (k,r,w,n) a coding system exists over the binary
                 alphabet F$_2$ = {0,1} and discuss how RW codes can be
                 combined.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "22",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Sang:2012:SSF,
  author =       "Lifeng Sang and Anish Arora",
  title =        "A shared-secret free security infrastructure for
                 wireless networks",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "7",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "23:1--23:??",
  month =        jul,
  year =         "2012",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2240166.2240173",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Tue Nov 6 19:20:32 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "This article develops a shared-secret free wireless
                 security infrastructure that provides confidentiality,
                 identity authentication, message authentication,
                 integrity, sender nonrepudiation, receiver
                 nonrepudiation, and anonymity. Our infrastructure is
                 based on two physical primitives, namely collaborative
                 jamming and spatial signature enforcement, and a zero
                 knowledge alternative for bootstrapping trust. Notably,
                 it eschews the use of shared secrets, while providing a
                 cryptosystem that is no less secure than conventional
                 cryptosystems.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "23",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Leroux:2012:DOS,
  author =       "Philippe Leroux and S{\'e}bastien Roy",
  title =        "Designing and optimizing swarming in a distributed
                 base station network: Application to power control",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "7",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "24:1--24:??",
  month =        jul,
  year =         "2012",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2240166.2240174",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Tue Nov 6 19:20:32 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "Todays' networks are becoming increasingly complex.
                 They must provide a growing variety of services to a
                 wide range of devices. In order to do so, they must
                 make efficient use of modern technologies including
                 MIMO, macrodiversity, power control, channel
                 allocation, beamforming, and so on. In this context,
                 the centralized management of radio resources on a
                 large scale is rapidly becoming intractable.
                 Distributed intelligence constitutes an increasingly
                 attractive solution to provide network-wide
                 self-configuration and adaptation capabilities. This
                 article presents the design of a swarming system for
                 autonomous power control which adapts naturally to the
                 changing conditions of mobile networks where
                 interference patterns are in constant flux. Empirical
                 methods proposed by Parunak [1997] to develop
                 MultiAgent Systems with Swarming (MASS) are applied to
                 the current context while emphasizing the key concepts
                 that lead to swarming (emergent behavior). A
                 simulation-based study reveals how the system can be
                 fine-tuned to obtain various solutions, balancing
                 resources differently to achieve different trade-off
                 points. Finally, it is shown that the distributed
                 approach based on swarming is not only feasible but
                 leads to higher global QoS levels than comparable
                 centralized approaches.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "24",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{LeBlond:2012:CPB,
  author =       "Stevens {Le Blond} and Fabrice {Le Fessant} and Erwan
                 {Le Merrer}",
  title =        "Choosing partners based on availability in {P2P}
                 networks",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "7",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "25:1--25:??",
  month =        jul,
  year =         "2012",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2240166.2240175",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Tue Nov 6 19:20:32 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "Availability of applications or devices is known to be
                 one of the most critical variables impacting the
                 performances of software systems. We study in this
                 article the problem of finding peers matching a given
                 availability pattern in a peer-to-peer (P2P) system.
                 Motivated by practical examples, we specify two formal
                 problems of availability matching that arise in real
                 applications: disconnection matching, where peers look
                 for partners expected to disconnect at the same time,
                 and presence matching, where peers look for partners
                 expected to be online simultaneously in the future. As
                 a scalable and inexpensive solution, we propose to use
                 epidemic protocols for topology management; we provide
                 corresponding metrics for both matching problems. We
                 evaluated this solution by simulating two P2P
                 applications, task scheduling and file storage, over a
                 new trace of the eDonkey network, the largest one with
                 availability information. We first proved the existence
                 of regularity patterns in the sessions of 14M peers
                 over 27 days. We also showed that, using only 7 days of
                 history, a simple predictor could select predictable
                 peers and successfully predicted their online periods
                 for the next week. Finally, simulations showed that our
                 simple solution provided good partners fast enough to
                 match the needs of both applications, and that
                 consequently, these applications performed as
                 efficiently at a much lower cost. This solution is
                 purely distributed as it does not rely on any central
                 server or oracle to operate. We believe that this work
                 will be useful for many P2P applications for which it
                 has been shown that choosing good partners, based on
                 their availability, drastically improves their
                 performance and stability.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "25",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Dolev:2012:ATC,
  author =       "Shlomi Dolev and Marina Kopeetsky",
  title =        "Anonymous transactions in computer networks",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "7",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "26:1--26:??",
  month =        jul,
  year =         "2012",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2240166.2240176",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Tue Nov 6 19:20:32 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "We present schemes for providing anonymous
                 transactions while privacy and anonymity are preserved,
                 providing user's anonymous authentication in
                 distributed networks such as the Internet. We first
                 present a practical scheme for anonymous transactions
                 while the transaction resolution is assisted by a
                 Trusted Authority. This practical scheme is extended to
                 a theoretical scheme where a Trusted Authority is not
                 involved in the transaction resolution. Both schemes
                 assume that all the players interact over anonymous
                 secure channels. Given authority that generates for
                 each player hard to produce evidence EVID (e.g.,
                 problem instance with or without a solution) to each
                 player, the identity of a user U is defined by the
                 ability to prove possession of aforementioned evidence.
                 We use zero-knowledge proof techniques to repeatedly
                 identify U by providing a proof that U has evidence
                 EVID, without revealing EVID, therefore avoiding
                 identity theft. In both schemes the authority provides
                 each user with a unique random string. A player U may
                 produce a unique user name and password for each other
                 player S using a one-way function over the random
                 string and the IP address of S. The player does not
                 have to maintain any information in order to reproduce
                 the user name and password used for accessing a player
                 S. Moreover, the player U may execute transactions with
                 a group of players S$^U$ in two phases; in the first
                 phase the player interacts with each server without
                 revealing information concerning its identity and
                 without possibly identifying linkability among the
                 servers in S$^U$. In the second phase the player allows
                 linkability and therefore transaction commitment with
                 all servers in S$^U$, while preserving anonymity (for
                 future transactions).",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "26",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Chen:2012:FST,
  author =       "Fei Chen and Alex X. Liu and Jeehyun Hwang and Tao
                 Xie",
  title =        "First step towards automatic correction of firewall
                 policy faults",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "7",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "27:1--27:??",
  month =        jul,
  year =         "2012",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2240166.2240177",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Tue Nov 6 19:20:32 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "Firewalls are critical components of network security
                 and have been widely deployed for protecting private
                 networks. A firewall determines whether to accept or
                 discard a packet that passes through it based on its
                 policy. However, most real-life firewalls have been
                 plagued with policy faults, which either allow
                 malicious traffic or block legitimate traffic. Due to
                 the complexity of firewall policies, manually locating
                 the faults of a firewall policy and further correcting
                 them are difficult. Automatically correcting the faults
                 of a firewall policy is an important and challenging
                 problem. In this article, we first propose a fault
                 model for firewall policies including five types of
                 faults. For each type of fault, we present an automatic
                 correction technique. Second, we propose the first
                 systematic approach that employs these five techniques
                 to automatically correct all or part of the
                 misclassified packets of a faulty firewall policy.
                 Third, we conducted extensive experiments to evaluate
                 the effectiveness of our approach. Experimental results
                 show that our approach is effective to correct a faulty
                 firewall policy with three of these types of faults.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "27",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Legtchenko:2012:RCR,
  author =       "Sergey Legtchenko and S{\'e}bastien Monnet and Pierre
                 Sens and Gilles Muller",
  title =        "{RelaxDHT}: a churn-resilient replication strategy for
                 peer-to-peer distributed hash-tables",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "7",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "28:1--28:??",
  month =        jul,
  year =         "2012",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2240166.2240178",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Tue Nov 6 19:20:32 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "DHT-based P2P systems provide a fault-tolerant and
                 scalable means to store data blocks in a fully
                 distributed way. Unfortunately, recent studies have
                 shown that if connection/disconnection frequency is too
                 high, data blocks may be lost. This is true for most of
                 the current DHT-based systems' implementations. To deal
                 with this problem, it is necessary to build more
                 efficient replication and maintenance mechanisms. In
                 this article, we study the effect of churn on PAST, an
                 existing DHT-based P2P system. We then propose
                 solutions to enhance churn tolerance and evaluate them
                 through discrete event simulation.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "28",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Blanchini:2012:CBP,
  author =       "Franco Blanchini and Daniele {De Caneva} and Pier Luca
                 Montessoro and Davide Pierattoni",
  title =        "Control-based $p$-persistent adaptive communication
                 protocol",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "7",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "29:1--29:??",
  month =        jul,
  year =         "2012",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2240166.2240179",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Tue Nov 6 19:20:32 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "An enhancement to the CSMA p-persistent protocol
                 family is proposed, based on a fully decentralized
                 control that adjusts the message transmission rate of
                 each node to the estimated density of surrounding
                 transmitting nodes. The system does not require
                 enumeration of nodes nor control messages, the only
                 input to the control coming from the physical medium
                 occupation. In addition to communication protocols,
                 this technique can be used as inexpensive and efficient
                 density estimation of physical entities in highly
                 dynamic scenarios. Stability conditions are proposed by
                 means of a rigorous theoretical investigation. We prove
                 that our algorithm ensures stability even with unknown
                 and time--varying network topologies. We show that good
                 channel exploitation levels can be assured as well by
                 suitably tuning the control parameters. A digital
                 algorithm for practical implementation is proposed. The
                 results are supported by simulation experiments.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "29",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Klinglmayr:2012:SOS,
  author =       "Johannes Klinglmayr and Christian Bettstetter",
  title =        "Self-organizing synchronization with
                 inhibitory-coupled oscillators: Convergence and
                 robustness",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "7",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "30:1--30:??",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2012",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2348832.2348833",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Tue Nov 6 19:20:34 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "Solutions for time synchronization based on coupled
                 oscillators operate in a self-organizing and adaptive
                 manner and can be applied to various types of dynamic
                 networks. The basic idea was inspired by swarms of
                 fireflies, whose flashing dynamics shows an emergent
                 behavior. This article introduces such a
                 synchronization technique whose main components are
                 ``inhibitory coupling'' and ``self-adjustment.'' Based
                 on this new technique, a number of contributions are
                 made. First, we prove that inhibitory coupling can lead
                 to perfect synchrony independent of initial conditions
                 for delay-free environments and homogeneous
                 oscillators. Second, relaxing the assumptions to
                 systems with delays and different phase rates, we prove
                 that such systems synchronize up to a certain precision
                 bound. We derive this bound assuming inhomogeneous
                 delays and show by simulations that it gives a good
                 estimate in strongly-coupled systems. Third, we show
                 that inhibitory coupling with self-adjustment quickly
                 leads to synchrony with a precision comparable to that
                 of excitatory coupling. Fourth, we analyze the
                 robustness against faulty members performing incorrect
                 coupling. While the specific precision-loss encountered
                 by such disturbances depends on system parameters, the
                 system always regains synchrony for the investigated
                 scenarios.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "30",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Wang:2012:HPK,
  author =       "Yufeng Wang and Akihiro Nakao and Athanasios V.
                 Vasilakos",
  title =        "Heterogeneity playing key role: Modeling and analyzing
                 the dynamics of incentive mechanisms in autonomous
                 networks",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "7",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "31:1--31:??",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2012",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2348832.2348834",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Tue Nov 6 19:20:34 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "Heterogeneities (heterogeneous characteristics) are
                 intrinsic in dynamic and autonomous networks, and may
                 be caused by the following factors: finite nodes,
                 structured network graph, mutation of node's strategy
                 and topological view, and dynamic linking, and so on.
                 However, few works systematically investigate the
                 effect of the intrinsic heterogeneities on the
                 evolutionary dynamics of incentive mechanisms in
                 autonomous networks. In this article, we thoroughly
                 discuss this interesting problem. Specifically, this
                 article respectively models the pairwise interaction
                 between peers as PD (prisoner's dilemma)-like game and
                 multiple peers' interactions as public-goods game,
                 proposes a general analytical framework for dynamics in
                 evolutionary game theory (EGT)-based incentive
                 mechanisms, and draws the following conclusions. First,
                 for explicit incentive mechanisms, due to
                 heterogeneity, it is impossible to get the static
                 equilibrium of absolutely-full-cooperation (or state
                 that provides service to the networks-so-called
                 reciprocation), but, on the other hand, heterogeneity
                 can facilitate reciprocation evolution, and drive the
                 whole system into almost-full-reciprocation state, that
                 is, most of the system time would be occupied by the
                 full reciprocation state. Second, even without any
                 explicit incentive mechanisms, simultaneous coevolution
                 between dynamic linking and peers' rational strategies
                 can not only facilitate the cooperation evolution, but
                 drive the network structure into the desirable
                 small-world structure. The philosophical implication of
                 our work is that simplicity and homogeneity are too
                 idealized for incentive mechanisms in autonomous
                 networks-diversity and heterogeneity are intrinsic for
                 any incentive mechanism that is compatible with the
                 essence of our real society. Diversity is everywhere.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "31",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Xu:2012:PPB,
  author =       "Shouhuai Xu and Wenlian Lu and Li Xu",
  title =        "Push- and pull-based epidemic spreading in networks:
                 Thresholds and deeper insights",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "7",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "32:1--32:??",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2012",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2348832.2348835",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Tue Nov 6 19:20:34 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "Understanding the dynamics of computer virus (malware,
                 worm) in cyberspace is an important problem that has
                 attracted a fair amount of attention. Early
                 investigations for this purpose adapted biological
                 epidemic models, and thus inherited the so-called
                 homogeneity assumption that each node is equally
                 connected to others. Later studies relaxed this often
                 unrealistic homogeneity assumption, but still focused
                 on certain power-law networks. Recently, researchers
                 investigated epidemic models in arbitrary networks
                 (i.e., no restrictions on network topology). However,
                 all these models only capture push-based infection,
                 namely that an infectious node always actively attempts
                 to infect its neighboring nodes. Very recently, the
                 concept of pull-based infection was introduced but was
                 not treated rigorously. Along this line of research,
                 the present article investigates push- and pull-based
                 epidemic spreading dynamics in arbitrary networks,
                 using a nonlinear dynamical systems approach. The
                 article advances the state-of-the-art as follows: (1)
                 It presents a more general and powerful sufficient
                 condition (also known as epidemic threshold in the
                 literature) under which the spreading will become
                 stable. (2) It gives both upper and lower bounds on the
                 global mean infection rate, regardless of the stability
                 of the spreading. (3) It offers insights into, among
                 other things, the estimation of the global mean
                 infection rate through localized monitoring of a small
                 constant number of nodes, without knowing the values of
                 the parameters.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "32",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Puviani:2012:MFA,
  author =       "Mariachiara Puviani and Giovanna Di Marzo Serugendo
                 and Regina Frei and Giacomo Cabri",
  title =        "A method fragments approach to methodologies for
                 engineering self-organizing systems",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "7",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "33:1--33:??",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2012",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2348832.2348836",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Tue Nov 6 19:20:34 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "This article summarizes five relevant methods for
                 developing self-organizing multiagent systems. It
                 identifies their most relevant aspects and provides a
                 description of each one under the form of method
                 fragments expressed using SPEM (Software and System
                 Process Engineering Metamodel). The use of a
                 ``metamodel'' to describe fragments facilitates the
                 comparison of the methods and their respective
                 fragments. These fragments can be combined and be part
                 of a more general ad hoc methodology, created according
                 to the needs of the designer. Self-organizing traffic
                 lights controllers and self-organizing displays are
                 chosen as case studies to illustrate the methods and to
                 underline which fragments are important for
                 self-organizing systems. Finally, we illustrate how to
                 augment PASSI2, an agent-based methodology which does
                 not consider self-organization aspects, with some of
                 the identified fragments for self-organization.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "33",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Quiroz:2012:DED,
  author =       "Andres Quiroz and Manish Parashar and Nathan
                 Gnanasambandam and Naveen Sharma",
  title =        "Design and evaluation of decentralized online
                 clustering",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "7",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "34:1--34:??",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2012",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2348832.2348837",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Tue Nov 6 19:20:34 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "Ensuring the efficient and robust operation of
                 distributed computational infrastructures is critical,
                 given that their scale and overall complexity is
                 growing at an alarming rate and that their management
                 is rapidly exceeding human capability. Clustering
                 analysis can be used to find patterns and trends in
                 system operational data, as well as highlight
                 deviations from these patterns. Such analysis can be
                 essential for verifying the correctness and efficiency
                 of the operation of the system, as well as for
                 discovering specific situations of interest, such as
                 anomalies or faults, that require appropriate
                 management actions. This work analyzes the automated
                 application of clustering for online system management,
                 from the point of view of the suitability of different
                 clustering approaches for the online analysis of system
                 data in a distributed environment, with minimal prior
                 knowledge and within a timeframe that allows the timely
                 interpretation of and response to clustering results.
                 For this purpose, we evaluate DOC (Decentralized Online
                 Clustering), a clustering algorithm designed to support
                 data analysis for autonomic management, and compare it
                 to existing and widely used clustering algorithms. The
                 comparative evaluations will show that DOC achieves a
                 good balance in the trade-offs inherent in the
                 challenges for this type of online management.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "34",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Giordanelli:2012:BIP,
  author =       "Raffaele Giordanelli and Carlo Mastroianni and Michela
                 Meo",
  title =        "Bio-Inspired {P2P} Systems: The Case of
                 Multidimensional Overlay",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "7",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "35:1--35:??",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2012",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2382570.2382571",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Tue Apr 30 18:33:32 MDT 2013",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "This article presents an ant-based approach that
                 enhances the flexibility, robustness and load balancing
                 characteristics of structured P2P systems. Most
                 notably, the approach allows peer indexes and resource
                 keys to be defined on different and independent spaces,
                 so that it overcomes the main limitation of standard
                 structured P2P systems, that is, the need to assign
                 each key to a peer having a specified index. This helps
                 to improve load balancing, especially when the
                 popularity distribution of resource keys is nonuniform,
                 and enables the efficient execution of complex and
                 range queries, which are essential in important types
                 of distributed systems, for example, in Grids and
                 Clouds. Beyond describing the general approach, this
                 article focuses on the specific case of Self-CAN, a
                 self-organizing P2P system that, while relying on the
                 multidimensional structured organization of peers
                 provided by CAN, exploits the operations of ant-based
                 mobile agents to sort the resource keys and distribute
                 them to peers. This system is particularly useful for
                 the management and discovery of the resources that can
                 be conveniently characterized by the values of several
                 independent attributes.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "35",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Maggio:2012:CDM,
  author =       "Martina Maggio and Henry Hoffmann and Alessandro V.
                 Papadopoulos and Jacopo Panerati and Marco D.
                 Santambrogio and Anant Agarwal and Alberto Leva",
  title =        "Comparison of Decision-Making Strategies for
                 Self-Optimization in Autonomic Computing Systems",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "7",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "36:1--36:??",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2012",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2382570.2382572",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Tue Apr 30 18:33:32 MDT 2013",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "Autonomic computing systems are capable of adapting
                 their behavior and resources thousands of times a
                 second to automatically decide the best way to
                 accomplish a given goal despite changing environmental
                 conditions and demands. Different decision mechanisms
                 are considered in the literature, but in the vast
                 majority of the cases a single technique is applied to
                 a given instance of the problem. This article proposes
                 a comparison of some state of the art approaches for
                 decision making, applied to a self-optimizing autonomic
                 system that allocates resources to a software
                 application. A variety of decision mechanisms, from
                 heuristics to control-theory and machine learning, are
                 investigated. The results obtained with these solutions
                 are compared by means of case studies using standard
                 benchmarks. Our results indicate that the most suitable
                 decision mechanism can vary depending on the specific
                 test case but adaptive and model predictive control
                 systems tend to produce good performance and may work
                 best in a priori unknown situations.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "36",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Stratan:2012:XRS,
  author =       "Corina Stratan and Jan Sacha and Jeff Napper and Paolo
                 Costa and Guillaume Pierre",
  title =        "The {XtreemOS} Resource Selection Service",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "7",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "37:1--37:??",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2012",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2382570.2382573",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Tue Apr 30 18:33:32 MDT 2013",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "Many large-scale utility computing infrastructures
                 comprise heterogeneous hardware and software resources.
                 This raises the need for scalable resource selection
                 services that identify resources that match application
                 requirements. Such a service must provide an efficient
                 lookup in spite of changing resource attributes such as
                 disk size, changing application requirements such as
                 installed software libraries, and changing system
                 composition as resources join or leave. We present a
                 fully decentralized, self-managing Resource Selection
                 Service (RSS) algorithm by which resources autonomously
                 select themselves when their attributes match a query.
                 An application specifies what it expects from a
                 resource by means of a conjunction of
                 (attribute,value-range) pairs, which are matched
                 against the attribute values of resources. The set of
                 search attributes can also be updated online to reflect
                 new requirements. We show that our solution scales in
                 the number of resources and in the number of
                 attributes, while being relatively insensitive to churn
                 and other membership changes like node failures. Our
                 RSS continuously self-adapts its routing structure in
                 response to variations in the distribution of node
                 attributes and queries. We show that this autonomous
                 optimization maintains performance and availability in
                 a long-lived service even when the set of application
                 requirements used to select resources changes.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "37",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Farahat:2012:LMA,
  author =       "Aly Farahat and Ali Ebnenasir",
  title =        "A Lightweight Method for Automated Design of
                 Convergence in Network Protocols",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "7",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "38:1--38:??",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2012",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2382570.2382574",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Tue Apr 30 18:33:32 MDT 2013",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "Design and verification of Self-Stabilizing (SS)
                 network protocols are difficult tasks in part because
                 of the convergence property that requires an SS
                 protocol to recover to a set of legitimate states from
                 any state in its state space. Once an SS protocol
                 reaches a legitimate state, it remains in the set of
                 legitimate states as long as there are no faults,
                 called the closure property. Distribution issues
                 exacerbate the design complexity of SS protocols as
                 processes should collaborate and take local actions
                 that result in global convergence. Most existing design
                 techniques are manual, and mainly focus on protocols
                 whose global state can be corrected if the local states
                 of all processes are corrected, called the locally
                 correctable protocols. After manual design, an SS
                 protocol has to be verified for closure and
                 convergence. Previous work observes that verifying SS
                 protocols is a harder problem than designing them as
                 developers have to ensure the correctness of closure
                 and convergence functionalities and their
                 noninterference. An algorithmic method for the design
                 of convergence generates protocols that are correct by
                 construction, thereby eliminating the need for
                 verification. In order to facilitate the design of SS
                 protocols, this article presents a lightweight method
                 for algorithmic addition of convergence to finite-state
                 nonstabilizing protocols, including nonlocally
                 correctable protocols. The proposed method enables the
                 reuse of design efforts in the development of different
                 self-stabilizing protocols. Moreover, for the first
                 time (to the best of our knowledge), this article
                 presents an algorithmic method for the addition of
                 convergence to symmetric protocols that consist of
                 structurally similar processes. The proposed approach
                 is supported by a software tool that automatically adds
                 convergence to nonstabilizing protocols. We have used
                 the proposed method/tool to automatically generate
                 several self-stabilizing protocols with up to 40
                 processes (and 3$^{40}$ states) in a few minutes on a
                 regular PC. Surprisingly, our tool has synthesized both
                 protocols that are the same as their manually designed
                 versions as well as alternative solutions for
                 well-known problems in the literature (e.g., Dijkstra's
                 token ring, maximal matching, graph coloring, agreement
                 and leader election in a ring). Moreover, the proposed
                 method has helped us detect a design flaw in a manually
                 designed self-stabilizing protocol.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "38",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Pitt:2012:ASE,
  author =       "Jeremy Pitt and Julia Schaumeier and Alexander
                 Artikis",
  title =        "Axiomatization of Socio-Economic Principles for
                 Self-Organizing Institutions: Concepts, Experiments and
                 Challenges",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "7",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "39:1--39:??",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2012",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2382570.2382575",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Tue Apr 30 18:33:32 MDT 2013",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "We address the problem of engineering self-organizing
                 electronic institutions for resource allocation in
                 open, embedded, and resource-constrained systems. In
                 such systems, there is decentralized control,
                 competition for resources and an expectation of both
                 intentional and unintentional errors. The ``optimal''
                 distribution of resources is then less important than
                 the endurance of the distribution mechanism. Under
                 these circumstances, we propose to model resource
                 allocation as a common-pool resource management
                 problem, and develop a formal characterization of
                 Elinor Ostrom's socio-economic principles for
                 self-governing institutions. This article applies a
                 method for sociologically inspired computing to give a
                 complete axiomatization of six of Ostrom's eight
                 principles in the Event Calculus. A testbed is
                 implemented for experimenting with the axiomatization.
                 The experimental results show that these principles
                 support enduring institutions, in terms of longevity
                 and membership, and also provide insight into
                 calibrating the transaction and running costs
                 associated with implementing the principles against the
                 behavioral profile of the institutional membership. We
                 conclude that it is possible to express Ostrom's
                 principles in logical form and that they are necessary
                 and sufficient conditions for enduring self-organizing
                 electronic institutions to manage sustainable
                 common-pool resources.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "39",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Parashar:2013:E,
  author =       "Manish Parashar and Franco Zambonelli",
  title =        "Editorial",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "8",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "1:1--1:??",
  month =        apr,
  year =         "2013",
  CODEN =        "????",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Tue Apr 30 18:33:34 MDT 2013",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "1",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Villatoro:2013:RCE,
  author =       "Daniel Villatoro and Jordi Sabater-Mir and Sandip
                 Sen",
  title =        "Robust convention emergence in social networks through
                 self-reinforcing structures dissolution",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "8",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "2:1--2:??",
  month =        apr,
  year =         "2013",
  CODEN =        "????",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Tue Apr 30 18:33:34 MDT 2013",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "Convention emergence solves the problem of choosing,
                 in a decentralized way and among all equally beneficial
                 conventions, the same convention for the entire
                 population in the system for their own benefit. Our
                 previous work has shown that reaching 100\% agreement
                 is not as straighforward as assumed by previous
                 researchers, that, in order to save computational
                 resources fixed the convergence rate to 90\% (measuring
                 the time it takes for 90\% of the population to
                 coordinate on the same action). In this article we
                 present the notion of social instruments as a set of
                 mechanisms that facilitate and accelerate the emergence
                 of norms from repeated interactions between members of
                 a society, only accessing local and public information
                 and thus ensuring agents' privacy and anonymity.
                 Specifically, we focus on two social instruments:
                 rewiring and observation. Our main goal is to provide
                 agents with tools that allow them to leverage their
                 social network of interactions while effectively
                 addressing coordination and learning problems, paying
                 special attention to dissolving metastable
                 subconventions. The first experimental results show
                 that even with the usage of the proposed instruments,
                 convergence is not accelerated or even obtained in
                 irregular networks. This result leads us to perform an
                 exhaustive analysis of irregular networks discovering
                 what we have defined as Self-Reinforcing Structures
                 (SRS). The SRS are topological configurations of nodes
                 that promote the establishment and persistence of
                 subconventions by producing a continuous reinforcing
                 effect on the frontier agents. Finally, we propose a
                 more sophisticated composed social instrument
                 (observation + rewiring) for robust resolution of
                 subconventions, which works by the dissolution of the
                 stable frontiers caused by the Self-Reinforcing
                 Substructures (SRS) within the social network.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "2",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Purkayastha:2013:CRA,
  author =       "Punyaslok Purkayastha and John S. Baras",
  title =        "Convergence results for ant routing algorithms via
                 stochastic approximation",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "8",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "3:1--3:??",
  month =        apr,
  year =         "2013",
  CODEN =        "????",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Tue Apr 30 18:33:34 MDT 2013",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "In this article, we provide convergence results for an
                 Ant-based Routing Algorithm (ARA) for wireline,
                 packet-switched communication networks, that are
                 acyclic. Such algorithms are inspired by the foraging
                 behavior of ants in nature. We consider an ARA
                 algorithm proposed earlier by Bean and Costa [2005].
                 The algorithm has the virtues of being adaptive and
                 distributed, and can provide a multipath routing
                 solution. We consider a scenario where there are
                 multiple incoming data traffic streams that are to be
                 routed to their respective destinations via the
                 network. Ant packets, which are nothing but probe
                 packets, are introduced to estimate the path delays in
                 the network. The node routing tables, which consist of
                 routing probabilities for the outgoing links, are
                 updated based on these delay estimates. In contrast to
                 the available analytical studies in the literature, the
                 link delays in our model are stochastic, time-varying,
                 and dependent on the link traffic. The evolution of the
                 delay estimates and the routing probabilities are
                 described by a set of stochastic iterative equations.
                 In doing so, we take into account the distributed and
                 asynchronous nature of the algorithm operation. Using
                 methods from the theory of stochastic approximations,
                 we show that the evolution of the delay estimates can
                 be closely tracked by a deterministic ODE (Ordinary
                 Differential Equation) system, when the step size of
                 the delay estimation scheme is small. We study the
                 equilibrium behavior of the ODE system in order to
                 obtain the equilibrium behavior of the routing
                 algorithm. We also explore properties of the
                 equilibrium routing probabilities, and provide
                 illustrative simulation results.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "3",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Habib:2013:ASW,
  author =       "Irfan Habib and Ashiq Anjum and Richard Mcclatchey and
                 Omer Rana",
  title =        "Adapting scientific workflow structures using
                 multi-objective optimization strategies",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "8",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "4:1--4:??",
  month =        apr,
  year =         "2013",
  CODEN =        "????",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Tue Apr 30 18:33:34 MDT 2013",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "Scientific workflows have become the primary mechanism
                 for conducting analyses on distributed computing
                 infrastructures such as grids and clouds. In recent
                 years, the focus of optimization within scientific
                 workflows has primarily been on computational tasks and
                 workflow makespan. However, as workflow-based analysis
                 becomes ever more data intensive, data optimization is
                 becoming a prime concern. Moreover, scientific
                 workflows can scale along several dimensions: (i)
                 number of computational tasks, (ii) heterogeneity of
                 computational resources, and the (iii) size and type
                 (static versus streamed) of data involved. Adapting
                 workflow structure in response to these scalability
                 challenges remains an important research objective.
                 Understanding how a workflow graph can be restructured
                 in an automated manner (through task merge, for
                 instance), to address constraints of a particular
                 execution environment is explored in this work, using a
                 multi-objective evolutionary approach. Our approach
                 attempts to adapt the workflow structure to achieve
                 both compute and data optimization. The question of
                 when to terminate the evolutionary search in order to
                 conserve computations is tackled with a novel
                 termination criterion. The results presented in this
                 article demonstrate the feasibility of the termination
                 criterion and demonstrate that significant optimization
                 can be achieved with a multi-objective approach.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "4",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Gallacher:2013:LUP,
  author =       "Sarah Gallacher and Eliza Papadopoulou and Nick K.
                 Taylor and M. Howard Williams",
  title =        "Learning user preferences for adaptive pervasive
                 environments: an incremental and temporal approach",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "8",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "5:1--5:??",
  month =        apr,
  year =         "2013",
  CODEN =        "????",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Tue Apr 30 18:33:34 MDT 2013",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "Personalization mechanisms often employ behavior
                 monitoring and machine learning techniques to aid the
                 user in the creation and management of a preference set
                 that is used to drive the adaptation of environments
                 and resources in line with individual user needs. This
                 article reviews several of the personalization
                 solutions provided to date and proposes two hypotheses:
                 (A) an incremental machine learning approach is better
                 suited to the preference learning problem as opposed to
                 the commonly employed batch learning techniques, (B)
                 temporal data related to the duration that user context
                 states and preference settings endure is a beneficial
                 input to a preference learning solution. These two
                 hypotheses are the cornerstones of the Dynamic
                 Incremental Associative Neural NEtwork (DIANNE)
                 developed as a tailored solution to preference learning
                 in a pervasive environment. DIANNE has been evaluated
                 in two ways: first, by applying it to benchmark
                 datasets to test DIANNE's performance and scalability
                 as a machine learning solution; second, by end-users in
                 live trials to determine the validity of the proposed
                 hypotheses and to evaluate DIANNE's utility as a
                 preference learning solution.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "5",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Mellouk:2013:SDT,
  author =       "Abdelhamid Mellouk and Said Hoceini and Sherali
                 Zeadally",
  title =        "A state-dependent time evolving multi-constraint
                 routing algorithm",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "8",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "6:1--6:??",
  month =        apr,
  year =         "2013",
  CODEN =        "????",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Tue Apr 30 18:33:34 MDT 2013",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "This article proposes a state-dependent routing
                 algorithm based on a global optimization cost function
                 whose parameters are learned from the real-time state
                 of the network with no a priori model. The proposed
                 approach samples, estimates, and builds the model of
                 pertinent and important aspects of the network
                 environment such as type of traffic, QoS policies,
                 resources, etc. It is based on the trial/error paradigm
                 combined with swarm-adaptive approaches. The global
                 system uses a model that combines both a stochastic
                 planned prenavigation for the exploration phase with a
                 deterministic approach for the backward phase. We
                 conducted a performance analysis of the proposed
                 algorithm using OPNET based on several topologies such
                 as the Nippon telephone and telegraph network. The
                 simulation results obtained demonstrate substantial
                 performance improvements over traditional routing
                 approaches as well as the benefits of learning
                 approaches for networks with dynamically changing
                 traffic.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "6",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Salvaneschi:2013:ALL,
  author =       "Guido Salvaneschi and Carlo Ghezzi and Matteo
                 Pradella",
  title =        "An Analysis of Language-Level Support for
                 Self-Adaptive Software",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "8",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "7:1--7:??",
  month =        jul,
  year =         "2013",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2491465.2491466",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Thu Mar 13 06:39:24 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "Self-adaptive software has become increasingly
                 important to address the new challenges of complex
                 computing systems. To achieve adaptation, software must
                 be designed and implemented by following suitable
                 criteria, methods, and strategies. Past research has
                 been mostly addressing adaptation by developing
                 solutions at the software architecture level. This
                 work, instead, focuses on finer-grain programming
                 language-level solutions. We analyze three main
                 linguistic approaches: metaprogramming, aspect-oriented
                 programming, and context-oriented programming. The
                 first two are general-purpose linguistic mechanisms,
                 whereas the third is a specific and focused approach
                 developed to support context-aware applications. This
                 paradigm provides specialized language-level
                 abstractions to implement dynamic adaptation and
                 modularize behavioral variations in adaptive systems.
                 The article shows how the three approaches can support
                 the implementation of adaptive systems and compares the
                 pros and cons offered by each solution.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "7",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Schneider:2013:CSC,
  author =       "Daniel Schneider and Mario Trapp",
  title =        "Conditional Safety Certification of Open Adaptive
                 Systems",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "8",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "8:1--8:??",
  month =        jul,
  year =         "2013",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2491465.2491467",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Thu Mar 13 06:39:24 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "In recent years it has become more and more evident
                 that openness and adaptivity are key characteristics of
                 next-generation distributed systems. The reason for
                 this is not least due to the advent of computing trends
                 like ubiquitous computing, ambient intelligence, and
                 cyber-physical systems, where systems are usually open
                 for dynamic integration and able to react adaptively to
                 changing situations. Despite being open and adaptive,
                 it is a common requirement for such systems to be safe.
                 However, traditional safety assurance techniques, both
                 state-of-the-practice and state-of-the-art ones, are
                 not sufficient in this context. We have recently
                 developed some initial solution concepts based on
                 conditional safety certificates and corresponding
                 runtime analyses. In this article we show how to
                 operationalize these concepts. To this end, we present
                 in detail how to specify conditional safety
                 certificates, how to transform them into suitable
                 runtime models, and how these models finally support
                 dynamic safety evaluations.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "8",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Lama:2013:APS,
  author =       "Palden Lama and Xiaobo Zhou",
  title =        "Autonomic Provisioning with Self-Adaptive Neural Fuzzy
                 Control for Percentile-Based Delay Guarantee",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "8",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "9:1--9:??",
  month =        jul,
  year =         "2013",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2491465.2491468",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Thu Mar 13 06:39:24 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "Autonomic server provisioning for performance
                 assurance is a critical issue in Internet services. It
                 is challenging to guarantee that requests flowing
                 through a multi-tier system will experience an
                 acceptable distribution of delays. The difficulty is
                 mainly due to highly dynamic workloads, the complexity
                 of underlying computer systems, and the lack of
                 accurate performance models. We propose a novel
                 autonomic server provisioning approach based on a
                 model-independent self-adaptive Neural Fuzzy Control
                 (NFC). Existing model-independent fuzzy controllers are
                 designed manually on a trial-and-error basis, and are
                 often ineffective in the face of highly dynamic
                 workloads. NFC is a hybrid of control-theoretical and
                 machine learning techniques. It is capable of
                 self-constructing its structure and adapting its
                 parameters through fast online learning. We further
                 enhance NFC to compensate for the effect of server
                 switching delays. Extensive simulations demonstrate
                 that, compared to a rule-based fuzzy controller and a
                 Proportional-Integral controller, the NFC-based
                 approach delivers superior performance assurance in the
                 face of highly dynamic workloads. It is robust to
                 variation in workload intensity, characteristics, delay
                 target, and server switching delays. We demonstrate the
                 feasibility and performance of the NFC-based approach
                 with a testbed implementation in virtualized blade
                 servers hosting a multi-tier online auction
                 benchmark.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "9",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Schuhmann:2013:ACD,
  author =       "Stephan Schuhmann and Klaus Herrmann and Kurt
                 Rothermel and Yazan Boshmaf",
  title =        "Adaptive Composition of Distributed Pervasive
                 Applications in Heterogeneous Environments",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "8",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "10:1--10:??",
  month =        jul,
  year =         "2013",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2491465.2491469",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Thu Mar 13 06:39:24 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "Complex pervasive applications need to be distributed
                 for two main reasons: due to the typical resource
                 restrictions of mobile devices, and to use local
                 services to interact with the immediate environment. To
                 set up such an application, the distributed components
                 require spontaneous composition. Since dynamics in the
                 environment and device failures may imply the
                 unavailability of components and devices at any time,
                 finding, maintaining, and adapting such a composition
                 is a nontrivial task. Moreover, the speed of such a
                 configuration process directly influences the user
                 since in the event of a configuration, the user has to
                 wait. In this article, we introduce configuration
                 algorithms for homogeneous and heterogeneous
                 environments. We discuss a comprehensive approach to
                 pervasive application configuration that adapts to the
                 characteristics of the environment: It chooses the most
                 efficient configuration method for the given
                 environment to minimize the configuration latency.
                 Moreover, we propose a new scheme for caching and
                 reusing partial application configurations. This scheme
                 reduces the configuration latency even further such
                 that a configuration can be executed without notable
                 disturbance of the user.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "10",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Jiang:2013:FAE,
  author =       "Hao Jiang and Jason O. Hallstrom",
  title =        "Fast, Accurate Event Classification on Resource-Lean
                 Embedded Sensors",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "8",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "11:1--11:??",
  month =        jul,
  year =         "2013",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2491465.2491470",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Thu Mar 13 06:39:24 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "Due to the limited computational and energy resources
                 available on existing wireless sensor platforms,
                 achieving high-precision classification of high-level
                 events in-network is a challenge. In this article, we
                 present in-network implementations of a Bayesian
                 classifier and a condensed kd-tree classifier for
                 identifying events of interest on resource-lean
                 embedded sensors. The first approach uses preprocessed
                 sensor readings to derive a multidimensional Bayesian
                 classifier used to classify sensor data in real time.
                 The second introduces an innovative condensed kd-tree
                 to represent preprocessed sensor data and uses a fast
                 nearest-neighbor search to determine the likelihood of
                 class membership for incoming samples. Both classifiers
                 consume limited resources and provide high-precision
                 classification. To evaluate each approach, two case
                 studies are considered, in the contexts of human
                 movement and vehicle navigation, respectively. The
                 classification accuracy is above 85\% for both
                 classifiers across the two case studies.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "11",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Conti:2013:DPE,
  author =       "Marco Conti and Matteo Mordacchini and Andrea
                 Passarella",
  title =        "Design and Performance Evaluation of Data
                 Dissemination Systems for Opportunistic Networks Based
                 on Cognitive Heuristics",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "8",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "12:1--12:??",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2013",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2518017.2518018",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Thu Mar 13 06:39:25 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "In the convergence of the Cyber-Physical World, user
                 devices will act as proxies of the humans in the cyber
                 world. They will be required to act in a vast
                 information landscape, asserting the relevance of data
                 spread in the cyber world, in order to let their human
                 users become aware of the content they really need.
                 This is a remarkably similar situation to what the
                 human brain has to do all the time when deciding what
                 information coming from the surrounding environment is
                 interesting and what can simply be ignored. The brain
                 performs this task using so called cognitive
                 heuristics, i.e. simple, rapid, yet very effective
                 schemes. In this article, we propose a new approach
                 that exploits one of these heuristics, the recognition
                 heuristic, for developing a self-adaptive system that
                 deals with effective data dissemination in
                 opportunistic networks. We show how to implement it and
                 provide an extensive analysis via simulation.
                 Specifically, results show that the proposed solution
                 is as effective as state-of-the-art solutions for data
                 dissemination in opportunistic networks, while
                 requiring far less resources. Finally, our
                 sensitiveness analysis shows how various parameters
                 depend on the context where nodes are situated, and
                 suggest corresponding optimal configurations for the
                 algorithm.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "12",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Campos:2013:RRA,
  author =       "Jordi Campos and Maite Lopez-Sanchez and Maria
                 Salam{\'o} and Pedro Avila and Juan A.
                 Rodr{\'\i}guez-Aguilar",
  title =        "Robust Regulation Adaptation in Multi-Agent Systems",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "8",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "13:1--13:??",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2013",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2517328",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Thu Mar 13 06:39:25 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "Adaptive organisation-centred multi-agent systems can
                 dynamically modify their organisational components to
                 better accomplish their goals. Our research line
                 proposes an abstract distributed architecture (2-LAMA)
                 to endow an organisation with adaptation capabilities.
                 This article focuses on regulation-adaptation based on
                 a machine learning approach, in which adaptation is
                 learned by applying a tailored case-based reasoning
                 method. We evaluate the robustness of the system when
                 it is populated by non compliant agents. The evaluation
                 is performed in a peer-to-peer sharing network
                 scenario. Results show that our proposal significantly
                 improves system performance and can cope with
                 regulation violators without incorporating any specific
                 regulation-compliance enforcement mechanisms.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "13",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Zhang:2013:PMO,
  author =       "Zhuoyao Zhang and Ludmila Cherkasova and Abhishek
                 Verma and Boon Thau Loo",
  title =        "Performance Modeling and Optimization of
                 Deadline-Driven Pig Programs",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "8",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "14:1--14:??",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2013",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2518017.2518019",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Thu Mar 13 06:39:25 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "Many applications associated with live business
                 intelligence are written as complex data analysis
                 programs defined by directed acyclic graphs of
                 MapReduce jobs, for example, using Pig, Hive, or Scope
                 frameworks. An increasing number of these applications
                 have additional requirements for completion time
                 guarantees. In this article, we consider the popular
                 Pig framework that provides a high-level SQL-like
                 abstraction on top of MapReduce engine for processing
                 large data sets. There is a lack of performance models
                 and analysis tools for automated performance management
                 of such MapReduce jobs. We offer a performance modeling
                 environment for Pig programs that automatically
                 profiles jobs from the past runs and aims to solve the
                 following inter-related problems: (i) estimating the
                 completion time of a Pig program as a function of
                 allocated resources; (ii) estimating the amount of
                 resources (a number of map and reduce slots) required
                 for completing a Pig program with a given (soft)
                 deadline. First, we design a basic performance model
                 that accurately predicts completion time and required
                 resource allocation for a Pig program that is defined
                 as a sequence of MapReduce jobs: predicted completion
                 times are within 10\% of the measured ones. Second, we
                 optimize a Pig program execution by enforcing the
                 optimal schedule of its concurrent jobs. For DAGs with
                 concurrent jobs, this optimization helps reducing the
                 program completion time: 10\%--27\% in our experiments.
                 Moreover, it eliminates possible nondeterminism of
                 concurrent jobs' execution in the Pig program, and
                 therefore, enables a more accurate performance model
                 for Pig programs. Third, based on these optimizations,
                 we propose a refined performance model for Pig programs
                 with concurrent jobs. The proposed approach leads to
                 significant resource savings (20\%--60\% in our
                 experiments) compared with the original, unoptimized
                 solution. We validate our solution using a 66-node
                 Hadoop cluster and a diverse set of workloads: PigMix
                 benchmark, TPC-H queries, and customized queries mining
                 a collection of HP Labs' web proxy logs.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "14",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Hao:2013:ASO,
  author =       "Jianye Hao and Ho-Fung Leung",
  title =        "Achieving Socially Optimal Outcomes in Multiagent
                 Systems with Reinforcement Social Learning",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "8",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "15:1--15:??",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2013",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2517329",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Thu Mar 13 06:39:25 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "In multiagent systems, social optimality is a
                 desirable goal to achieve in terms of maximizing the
                 global efficiency of the system. We study the problem
                 of coordinating on socially optimal outcomes among a
                 population of agents, in which each agent randomly
                 interacts with another agent from the population each
                 round. Previous work [Hales and Edmonds 2003; Matlock
                 and Sen 2007, 2009] mainly resorts to modifying the
                 interaction protocol from random interaction to
                 tag-based interactions and only focus on the case of
                 symmetric games. Besides, in previous work the agents'
                 decision making processes are usually based on
                 evolutionary learning, which usually results in high
                 communication cost and high deviation on the
                 coordination rate. To solve these problems, we propose
                 an alternative social learning framework with two major
                 contributions as follows. First, we introduce the
                 observation mechanism to reduce the amount of
                 communication required among agents. Second, we propose
                 that the agents' learning strategies should be based on
                 reinforcement learning technique instead of
                 evolutionary learning. Each agent explicitly keeps the
                 record of its current state in its learning strategy,
                 and learn its optimal policy for each state
                 independently. In this way, the learning performance is
                 much more stable and also it is suitable for both
                 symmetric and asymmetric games. The performance of this
                 social learning framework is extensively evaluated
                 under the testbed of two-player general-sum games
                 comparing with previous work [Hao and Leung 2011;
                 Matlock and Sen 2007]. The influences of different
                 factors on the learning performance of the social
                 learning framework are investigated as well.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "15",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Editors:2014:ISS,
  author =       "Editors:",
  title =        "Introduction to the Special Section on Best Papers
                 from {SEAMS 2012}",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "8",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "16:1--16:??",
  month =        jan,
  year =         "2014",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2555610",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Thu Mar 13 06:39:26 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "16",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Yuan:2014:SSS,
  author =       "Eric Yuan and Naeem Esfahani and Sam Malek",
  title =        "A Systematic Survey of Self-Protecting Software
                 Systems",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "8",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "17:1--17:??",
  month =        jan,
  year =         "2014",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2555611",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Thu Mar 13 06:39:26 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "Self-protecting software systems are a class of
                 autonomic systems capable of detecting and mitigating
                 security threats at runtime. They are growing in
                 importance, as the stovepipe static methods of securing
                 software systems have been shown to be inadequate for
                 the challenges posed by modern software systems.
                 Self-protection, like other self-* properties, allows
                 the system to adapt to the changing environment through
                 autonomic means without much human intervention, and
                 can thereby be responsive, agile, and cost effective.
                 While existing research has made significant progress
                 towards autonomic and adaptive security, gaps and
                 challenges remain. This article presents a significant
                 extension of our preliminary study in this area. In
                 particular, unlike our preliminary study, here we have
                 followed a systematic literature review process, which
                 has broadened the scope of our study and strengthened
                 the validity of our conclusions. By proposing and
                 applying a comprehensive taxonomy to classify and
                 characterize the state-of-the-art research in this
                 area, we have identified key patterns, trends and
                 challenges in the existing approaches, which reveals a
                 number of opportunities that will shape the focus of
                 future research efforts.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "17",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Vogel:2014:MDE,
  author =       "Thomas Vogel and Holger Giese",
  title =        "Model-Driven Engineering of Self-Adaptive Software
                 with {EUREMA}",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "8",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "18:1--18:??",
  month =        jan,
  year =         "2014",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2555612",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Thu Mar 13 06:39:26 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "The development of self-adaptive software requires the
                 engineering of an adaptation engine that controls the
                 underlying adaptable software by feedback loops. The
                 engine often describes the adaptation by runtime models
                 representing the adaptable software and by activities
                 such as analysis and planning that use these models. To
                 systematically address the interplay between runtime
                 models and adaptation activities, runtime megamodels
                 have been proposed. A runtime megamodel is a specific
                 model capturing runtime models and adaptation
                 activities. In this article, we go one step further and
                 present an executable modeling language for ExecUtable
                 RuntimE MegAmodels (EUREMA) that eases the development
                 of adaptation engines by following a model-driven
                 engineering approach. We provide a domain-specific
                 modeling language and a runtime interpreter for
                 adaptation engines, in particular feedback loops.
                 Megamodels are kept alive at runtime and by
                 interpreting them, they are directly executed to run
                 feedback loops. Additionally, they can be dynamically
                 adjusted to adapt feedback loops. Thus, EUREMA supports
                 development by making feedback loops explicit at a
                 higher level of abstraction and it enables solutions
                 where multiple feedback loops interact or operate on
                 top of each other and self-adaptation co-exists with
                 offline adaptation for evolution.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "18",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Xu:2014:AED,
  author =       "Shouhuai Xu and Wenlian Lu and Li Xu and Zhenxin
                 Zhan",
  title =        "Adaptive Epidemic Dynamics in Networks: Thresholds and
                 Control",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "8",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "19:1--19:??",
  month =        jan,
  year =         "2014",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2555613",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Thu Mar 13 06:39:26 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "Theoretical modeling of computer virus/worm epidemic
                 dynamics is an important problem that has attracted
                 many studies. However, most existing models are adapted
                 from biological epidemic ones. Although biological
                 epidemic models can certainly be adapted to capture
                 some computer virus spreading scenarios (especially
                 when the so-called homogeneity assumption holds), the
                 problem of computer virus spreading is not well
                 understood because it has many important perspectives
                 that are not necessarily accommodated in the biological
                 epidemic models. In this article, we initiate the study
                 of such a perspective, namely that of adaptive defense
                 against epidemic spreading in arbitrary networks. More
                 specifically, we investigate a nonhomogeneous
                 Susceptible-Infectious-Susceptible (SIS) model where
                 the model parameters may vary with respect to time. In
                 particular, we focus on two scenarios we call
                 semi-adaptive defense and fully adaptive defense, which
                 accommodate implicit and explicit dependency
                 relationships between the model parameters,
                 respectively. In the semi-adaptive defense scenario,
                 the model's input parameters are given; the defense is
                 semi-adaptive because the adjustment is implicitly
                 dependent upon the outcome of virus spreading. For this
                 scenario, we present a set of sufficient conditions
                 (some are more general or succinct than others) under
                 which the virus spreading will die out; such sufficient
                 conditions are also known as epidemic thresholds in the
                 literature. In the fully adaptive defense scenario,
                 some input parameters are not known (i.e., the
                 aforementioned sufficient conditions are not
                 applicable) but the defender can observe the outcome of
                 virus spreading. For this scenario, we present adaptive
                 control strategies under which the virus spreading will
                 die out or will be contained to a desired level.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "19",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Venkatasubramanian:2014:CAP,
  author =       "Krishna K. Venkatasubramanian and Tridib Mukherjee and
                 Sandeep K. S. Gupta",
  title =        "{CAAC} --- An Adaptive and Proactive Access Control
                 Approach for Emergencies in Smart Infrastructures",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "8",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "20:1--20:??",
  month =        jan,
  year =         "2014",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2555614",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Thu Mar 13 06:39:26 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "The article presents an access control model called
                 Criticality Aware Access Control (CAAC) for criticality
                 (emergency) management in smart infrastructures.
                 Criticalities are consequences of events which take a
                 system (in our case, a smart infrastructure) into an
                 unstable state. They require the execution of specific
                 response actions in order to bring them under control.
                 The principal aim of CAAC is to grant the right set of
                 access privileges (to facilitate response action
                 execution), at the right time, to the right set of
                 subjects, for the right duration, in order to control
                 the criticalities within the system. In this regard,
                 the CAAC model uses a stochastic model called the
                 Action Generation Model to determine the required
                 response actions for the combination of criticalities
                 present within the system. It then facilitates response
                 actions by adaptively altering the privileges to
                 specific subjects, in a proactive manner, without the
                 need for any explicit access requests. In this article,
                 we formalize the CAAC model and validate it based on
                 two design goals --- proactivity and adaptiveness.
                 Finally, we present a case study demonstrating CAAC's
                 operation on an oil-rig platform in order to aid in the
                 response to health- and fire-related criticalities.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "20",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Chen:2014:HBA,
  author =       "Songqing Chen and Lei Liu and Xinyuan Wang and Xinwen
                 Zhang and Zhao Zhang",
  title =        "A Host-Based Approach for Unknown Fast-Spreading Worm
                 Detection and Containment",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "8",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "21:1--21:??",
  month =        jan,
  year =         "2014",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2555615",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Thu Mar 13 06:39:26 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/virtual-machines.bib",
  abstract =     "The fast-spreading worm, which immediately propagates
                 itself after a successful infection, is becoming one of
                 the most serious threats to today's networked
                 information systems. In this article, we present
                 WormTerminator, a host-based solution for fast Internet
                 worm detection and containment with the assistance of
                 virtual machine techniques based on the fast-worm
                 defining characteristic. In WormTerminator, a virtual
                 machine cloning the host OS runs in parallel to the
                 host OS. Thus, the virtual machine has the same set of
                 vulnerabilities as the host. Any outgoing traffic from
                 the host is diverted through the virtual machine. If
                 the outgoing traffic from the host is for fast worm
                 propagation, the virtual machine should be infected and
                 will exhibit worm propagation pattern very quickly
                 because a fast-spreading worm will start to propagate
                 as soon as it successfully infects a host. To prove the
                 concept, we have implemented a prototype of
                 WormTerminator and have examined its effectiveness
                 against the real Internet worm Linux/Slapper. Our
                 empirical results confirm that WormTerminator is able
                 to completely contain worm propagation in real-time
                 without blocking any non-worm traffic. The major
                 performance cost of WormTerminator is a one-time delay
                 to the start of each outgoing normal connection for
                 worm detection. To reduce the performance overhead,
                 caching is utilized, through which WormTerminator will
                 delay no more than 6\% normal outgoing traffic for such
                 detection on average.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "21",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Peleteiro:2014:FCT,
  author =       "Ana Peleteiro and Juan C. Burguillo and Josep Ll.
                 Arcos and Juan A. Rodriguez-Aguilar",
  title =        "Fostering Cooperation through Dynamic Coalition
                 Formation and Partner Switching",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "9",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "1:1--1:??",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2014",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2567928",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Fri Mar 21 17:55:35 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "In this article we tackle the problem of maximizing
                 cooperation among self-interested agents in a resource
                 exchange environment. Our main concern is the design of
                 mechanisms for maximizing cooperation among
                 self-interested agents in a way that their profits
                 increase by exchanging or trading with resources.
                 Although dynamic coalition formation and partner
                 switching (rewiring) have been shown to promote the
                 emergence and maintenance of cooperation for
                 self-interested agents, no prior work in the literature
                 has investigated whether merging both mechanisms
                 exhibits positive synergies that lead to increase
                 cooperation even further. Therefore, we introduce and
                 analyze a novel dynamic coalition formation mechanism,
                 that uses partner switching, to help self-interested
                 agents to increase their profits in a resource exchange
                 environment. Our experiments show the effectiveness of
                 our mechanism at increasing the agents' profits, as
                 well as the emergence of trading as the preferred
                 behavior over different types of complex networks.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "1",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Mencagli:2014:CPC,
  author =       "Gabriele Mencagli and Marco Vanneschi and Emanuele
                 Vespa",
  title =        "A Cooperative Predictive Control Approach to Improve
                 the Reconfiguration Stability of Adaptive Distributed
                 Parallel Applications",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "9",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "2:1--2:??",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2014",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2567929",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Fri Mar 21 17:55:35 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "Adaptiveness in distributed parallel applications is a
                 key feature to provide satisfactory performance results
                 in the face of unexpected events such as workload
                 variations and time-varying user requirements. The
                 adaptation process is based on the ability to change
                 specific characteristics of parallel components (e.g.,
                 their parallelism degree) and to guarantee that such
                 modifications of the application configuration are
                 effective and durable. Reconfigurations often incur a
                 cost on the execution (a performance overhead and/or an
                 economic cost). For this reason advanced adaptation
                 strategies have become of paramount importance.
                 Effective strategies must achieve properties like
                 control optimality (making decisions that optimize the
                 global application QoS), reconfiguration stability
                 expressed in terms of the average time between
                 consecutive reconfigurations of the same component, and
                 optimizing the reconfiguration amplitude (number of
                 allocated/deallocated resources). To control such
                 parameters, in this article we propose a method based
                 on a Cooperative Model-based Predictive Control
                 approach in which application controllers cooperate to
                 make optimal reconfigurations and taking account of the
                 durability and amplitude of their control decisions.
                 The effectiveness and the feasibility of the
                 methodology is demonstrated through experiments
                 performed in a simulation environment and by comparing
                 it with other existing techniques.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "2",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Barna:2014:MAU,
  author =       "Cornel Barna and Mark Shtern and Michael Smit and
                 Vassilios Tzerpos and Marin Litoiu",
  title =        "Mitigating {DoS} Attacks Using Performance
                 Model-Driven Adaptive Algorithms",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "9",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "3:1--3:??",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2014",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2567926",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Fri Mar 21 17:55:35 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "Denial of Service (DoS) attacks overwhelm online
                 services, preventing legitimate users from accessing a
                 service, often with impact on revenue or consumer
                 trust. Approaches exist to filter network-level
                 attacks, but application-level attacks are harder to
                 detect at the firewall. Filtering at this level can be
                 computationally expensive and difficult to scale, while
                 still producing false positives that block legitimate
                 users. This article presents a model-based adaptive
                 architecture and algorithm for detecting DoS attacks at
                 the web application level and mitigating them. Using a
                 performance model to predict the impact of arriving
                 requests, a decision engine adaptively generates rules
                 for filtering traffic and sending suspicious traffic
                 for further review, where the end user is given the
                 opportunity to demonstrate they are a legitimate user.
                 If no legitimate user responds to the challenge, the
                 request is dropped. Experiments performed on a scalable
                 implementation demonstrate effective mitigation of
                 attacks launched using a real-world DoS attack tool.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "3",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Dai:2014:BAN,
  author =       "Y. S. Dai and Y. P. Xiang and Y. Pan",
  title =        "Bionic Autonomic Nervous Systems for Self-Defense
                 against {DoS}, Spyware, Malware, Virus, and Fishing",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "9",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "4:1--4:??",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2014",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2567924",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Fri Mar 21 17:55:35 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "Computing systems and networks become increasingly
                 large and complex with a variety of compromises and
                 vulnerabilities. The network security and privacy are
                 of great concern today, where self-defense against
                 different kinds of attacks in an autonomous and
                 holistic manner is a challenging topic. To address this
                 problem, we developed an innovative technology called
                 Bionic Autonomic Nervous System (BANS). The BANS is
                 analogous to biological nervous system, which consists
                 of basic modules like cyber axon, cyber neuron,
                 peripheral nerve and central nerve. We also presented
                 an innovative self-defense mechanism which utilizes the
                 Fuzzy Logic, Neural Networks, and Entropy Awareness,
                 etc. Equipped with the BANS, computer and network
                 systems can intelligently self-defend against both
                 known and unknown compromises/attacks including denial
                 of services (DoS), spyware, malware, and virus. BANS
                 also enabled multiple computers to collaboratively
                 fight against some distributed intelligent attacks like
                 DDoS. We have implemented the BANS in practice. Some
                 case studies and experimental results exhibited the
                 effectiveness and efficiency of the BANS and the
                 self-defense mechanism.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "4",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Luo:2014:MDA,
  author =       "Jiaqing Luo and Bin Xiao and Qingjun Xiao and Jiannong
                 Cao and Minyi Guo",
  title =        "Modeling and Defending against Adaptive {BitTorrent}
                 Worms in Peer-to-Peer Networks",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "9",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "5:1--5:??",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2014",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2567925",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Fri Mar 21 17:55:35 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "BitTorrent (BT) is one of the most common Peer-to-Peer
                 (P2P) file sharing protocols. Rather than downloading a
                 file from a single source, the protocol allows users to
                 join a swarm of peers to download and upload from each
                 other simultaneously. Worms exploiting information from
                 BT servers or trackers can cause serious damage to
                 participating peers, which unfortunately has been
                 neglected previously. In this article, we first present
                 a new worm, called Adaptive BitTorrent worm (A-BT
                 worm), which finds new victims and propagates sending
                 forged requests to trackers. To reduce its abnormal
                 behavior, the worm estimates the ratio of infected
                 peers and adaptively adjusts its propagation speed. We
                 then build a hybrid model to precisely characterize the
                 propagation behavior of the worm. We also propose a
                 statistical method to automatically detect the worm
                 from the tracker by estimating the variance of the time
                 intervals of requests. To slow down the worm
                 propagation, we design a safe strategy in which the
                 tracker returns secured peers when receives a request.
                 Finally, we evaluate the accuracy of the hybrid model,
                 and the effectiveness of our detection method and
                 containment strategy through simulations.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "5",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Fernandez-Marquez:2014:BAS,
  author =       "Jose Luis Fernandez-Marquez and Mirko Viroli and
                 Gabriella Castelli",
  title =        "Best {ACM SAC} Articles on Coordination and
                 Self-Adaptation",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "9",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "6:1--6:??",
  month =        jul,
  year =         "2014",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2628613",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Tue Jul 8 16:04:06 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "6",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{DeNicola:2014:FAA,
  author =       "Rocco {De Nicola} and Michele Loreti and Rosario
                 Pugliese and Francesco Tiezzi",
  title =        "A Formal Approach to Autonomic Systems Programming:
                 The {SCEL} Language",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "9",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "7:1--7:??",
  month =        jul,
  year =         "2014",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2619998",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Tue Jul 8 16:04:06 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "The autonomic computing paradigm has been proposed to
                 cope with size, complexity, and dynamism of
                 contemporary software-intensive systems. The challenge
                 for language designers is to devise appropriate
                 abstractions and linguistic primitives to deal with the
                 large dimension of systems and with their need to adapt
                 to the changes of the working environment and to the
                 evolving requirements. We propose a set of programming
                 abstractions that permit us to represent behaviors,
                 knowledge, and aggregations according to specific
                 policies and to support programming context-awareness,
                 self-awareness, and adaptation. Based on these
                 abstractions, we define SCEL (Software Component
                 Ensemble Language), a kernel language whose solid
                 semantic foundations lay also the basis for formal
                 reasoning on autonomic systems behavior. To show
                 expressiveness and effectiveness of SCEL;'s design, we
                 present a Java implementation of the proposed
                 abstractions and show how it can be exploited for
                 programming a robotics scenario that is used as a
                 running example for describing the features and
                 potential of our approach.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "7",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Harnie:2014:PUA,
  author =       "Dries Harnie and Elisa Gonzalez Boix and Theo D'hondt
                 and Wolfgang {De Meuter}",
  title =        "Programming Urban-Area Applications by Exploiting
                 Public Transportation",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "9",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "8:1--8:??",
  month =        jul,
  year =         "2014",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2619999",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Tue Jul 8 16:04:06 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "The evolution of smartphones has given rise to
                 urban-area applications: applications that communicate
                 in a city by means of the public (moving)
                 infrastructure (e.g., buses and trams). In this
                 setting, applications need to communicate with and
                 discover each other using intermediaries that move
                 around the city and transfer data between them. This
                 requires programmers to scatter code that deals with
                 routing messages to the correct place and deal with
                 network failures all over their programs. Our approach
                 allows the programmer to specify urban-area
                 applications in a high-level manner without the burden
                 of directly encoding communication using
                 intermediaries. We present this as a translation from a
                 high-level object-oriented programming paradigm to a
                 low-level communication mechanism. This translation
                 allows the programmer to restrict routing of messages
                 to, for example, a certain number of hops, geographic
                 areas, or even types of carrier devices. In addition,
                 we show how high-level group messaging can be
                 efficiently represented in the low-level communication.
                 Finally, we document our experiences in setting up a
                 small-scale real-world urban-area application.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "8",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Kalyvianaki:2014:ARP,
  author =       "Evangelia Kalyvianaki and Themistoklis Charalambous
                 and Steven Hand",
  title =        "Adaptive Resource Provisioning for Virtualized Servers
                 Using {Kalman} Filters",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "9",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "10:1--10:??",
  month =        jul,
  year =         "2014",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2626290",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Tue Jul 8 16:04:06 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "Resource management of virtualized servers in data
                 centers has become a critical task, since it enables
                 cost-effective consolidation of server applications.
                 Resource management is an important and challenging
                 task, especially for multitier applications with
                 unpredictable time-varying workloads. Work in resource
                 management using control theory has shown clear
                 benefits of dynamically adjusting resource allocations
                 to match fluctuating workloads. However, little work
                 has been done toward adaptive controllers for unknown
                 workload types. This work presents a new resource
                 management scheme that incorporates the Kalman filter
                 into feedback controllers to dynamically allocate CPU
                 resources to virtual machines hosting server
                 applications. We present a set of controllers that
                 continuously detect and self-adapt to unforeseen
                 workload changes. Furthermore, our most advanced
                 controller also self-configures itself without any a
                 priori information and with a small 4.8\% performance
                 penalty in the case of high-intensity workload changes.
                 In addition, our controllers are enhanced to deal with
                 multitier server applications: by using the pair-wise
                 resource coupling between tiers, they improve server
                 response to large workload increases as compared to
                 controllers with no such resource-coupling mechanism.
                 Our approaches are evaluated and their performance is
                 illustrated on a 3-tier Rubis benchmark website
                 deployed on a prototype Xen-virtualized cluster.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "10",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

@Article{Didona:2014:TAS,
  author =       "Diego Didona and Paolo Romano and Sebastiano Peluso
                 and Francesco Quaglia",
  title =        "{Transactional Auto Scaler}: Elastic Scaling of
                 Replicated In-Memory Transactional Data Grids",
  journal =      j-TAAS,
  volume =       "9",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "11:1--11:??",
  month =        jul,
  year =         "2014",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2620001",
  ISSN =         "1556-4665 (print), 1556-4703 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4665",
  bibdate =      "Tue Jul 8 16:04:06 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/taas.bib",
  abstract =     "In this article, we introduce TAS (Transactional Auto
                 Scaler), a system for automating the elastic scaling of
                 replicated in-memory transactional data grids, such as
                 NoSQL data stores or Distributed Transactional
                 Memories. Applications of TAS range from online
                 self-optimization of in-production applications to the
                 automatic generation of QoS/cost-driven elastic scaling
                 policies, as well as to support for what-if analysis on
                 the scalability of transactional applications. In this
                 article, we present the key innovation at the core of
                 TAS, namely, a novel performance forecasting
                 methodology that relies on the joint usage of
                 analytical modeling and machine learning. By exploiting
                 these two classically competing approaches in a
                 synergic fashion, TAS achieves the best of the two
                 worlds, namely, high extrapolation power and good
                 accuracy, even when faced with complex workloads
                 deployed over public cloud infrastructures. We
                 demonstrate the accuracy and feasibility of TAS's
                 performance forecasting methodology via an extensive
                 experimental study based on a fully fledged prototype
                 implementation integrated with a popular open-source
                 in-memory transactional data grid (Red Hat's
                 Infinispan) and industry-standard benchmarks generating
                 a breadth of heterogeneous workloads.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "11",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems
                 (TAAS)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1010",
}

%% [08-Jul-2014] Check for more papers in incomplete v9 n2