%%% -*-BibTeX-*-
%%% ====================================================================
%%%  BibTeX-file{
%%%     author          = "Nelson H. F. Beebe",
%%%     version         = "1.05",
%%%     date            = "26 December 2012",
%%%     time            = "07:37:29 MST",
%%%     filename        = "sigcse2000.bib",
%%%     address         = "University of Utah
%%%                        Department of Mathematics, 110 LCB
%%%                        155 S 1400 E RM 233
%%%                        Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0090
%%%                        USA",
%%%     telephone       = "+1 801 581 5254",
%%%     FAX             = "+1 801 581 4148",
%%%     URL             = "http://www.math.utah.edu/~beebe",
%%%     checksum        = "12760 111353 554607 5401043",
%%%     email           = "beebe at math.utah.edu, beebe at acm.org,
%%%                        beebe at computer.org (Internet)",
%%%     codetable       = "ISO/ASCII",
%%%     keywords        = "ACM Special Interest Group on Computer
%%%                        Science Education; bibliography; BibTeX;
%%%                        SIGCSE Bulletin",
%%%     license         = "public domain",
%%%     supported       = "yes",
%%%     docstring       = "This is a COMPLETE BibTeX bibliography for
%%%                        ACM SIGCSE Bulletin (CODEN SIGSD3, ISSN
%%%                        0097-8418), for the decade 2000--2009.  The
%%%                        journal began publishing with volume 1,
%%%                        number 1, in February 1969.  The journal
%%%                        usually appears four times a year.
%%%
%%%                        The journal has World-Wide Web sites at
%%%
%%%                            http://www.acm.org/sigcse/
%%%                            http://www.sigcse.org/
%%%
%%%                        with tables of contents at
%%%
%%%                            http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688
%%%                            http://portal.acm.org/sigcse/newsletter
%%%
%%%                        At version 1.05, the year coverage looked
%%%                        like this:
%%%
%%%                             2000 ( 237)    2004 ( 290)    2008 ( 332)
%%%                             2001 ( 247)    2005 ( 348)    2009 ( 340)
%%%                             2002 ( 274)    2006 ( 331)
%%%                             2003 ( 287)    2007 ( 348)
%%%
%%%                             Article:       3008
%%%                             Proceedings:     26
%%%
%%%                             Total entries: 3034
%%%
%%%                        This bibliography was constructed primarily
%%%                        from data in the ACM Portal database, and
%%%                        from the many bibliographies in the TeX User
%%%                        Group and BibNet Project archives, and the
%%%                        Karlsruhe Computer Science bibliography
%%%                        archive.
%%%
%%%                        Numerous errors in the sources noted above
%%%                        have been corrected.  Spelling has been
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%%%                        programs using the exception dictionary
%%%                        stored in the companion file with extension
%%%                        .sok.
%%%
%%%                        BibTeX citation tags are uniformly chosen as
%%%                        name:year:abbrev, where name is the family
%%%                        name of the first author or editor, year is a
%%%                        4-digit number, and abbrev is a 3-letter
%%%                        condensation of important title words.
%%%                        Citation labels were automatically generated
%%%                        by software developed for the BibNet Project.
%%%
%%%                        In this bibliography, entries are sorted in
%%%                        publication order, with the help of
%%%                        ``bibsort -byvolume''.  The bibsort utility
%%%                        is available from
%%%
%%%                            http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/bibsort
%%%                            ftp://ftp.math.utah.edu/pub/bibsort
%%%
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%%%                        checksum as the first value, followed by the
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%%% ====================================================================
%%% Acknowledgement abbreviations:

@String{ack-nhfb = "Nelson H. F. Beebe,
                    University of Utah,
                    Department of Mathematics, 110 LCB,
                    155 S 1400 E RM 233,
                    Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0090, USA,
                    Tel: +1 801 581 5254,
                    FAX: +1 801 581 4148,
                    e-mail: \path|beebe@math.utah.edu|,
                            \path|beebe@acm.org|,
                            \path|beebe@computer.org| (Internet),
                    URL: \path|http://www.math.utah.edu/~beebe/|"}

%%% ====================================================================
%%% Journal abbreviations:

@String{j-SIGCSE                = "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group
                                  on Computer Science Education)"}

%%% ====================================================================
%%% Publishers and their addresses:

@String{pub-ACM                 = "ACM Press"}
@String{pub-ACM:adr             = "New York, NY 10036, USA"}

%%% ====================================================================
%%% Bibliography entries, in publication order (with
%%% `bibsort -byvolume'):


@Article{Bedy:2000:VSM,
  author =       "Michael Bedy and Steve Carr and Xianlong Huang and
                 Ching-Kuang Shene",
  title =        "A visualization system for multithreaded programming",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "1--5",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331798",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Hung:2000:IVI,
  author =       "Ted Hung and Susan H. Rodger",
  title =        "Increasing visualization and interaction in the
                 automata theory course",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "6--10",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331800",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "In this paper we describe how to increase the
                 visualization and interaction in the automata theory
                 course through the use of the tools JFLAP and
                 P{\^a}t{\'e}. We also describe new features in these
                 tools that allow additional visualization and
                 interaction. New features in JFLAP include the addition
                 of regular expressions and exploring their conversion
                 from and to nondeterministic finite automata (NFA), and
                 increasing the interaction in the conversion of
                 automata to grammars. New features in P{\^a}t{\'e}
                 include the display of a parse tree while parsing
                 unrestricted grammars, and improved interaction with
                 parsing and the transformation of grammars.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Kaplan:2000:CVT,
  author =       "Alan Kaplan and Denise Shoup",
  title =        "{CUPV} --- a visualization tool for generated
                 parsers",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "11--15",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331801",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Compiler projects frequently use parser generators to
                 help students design and construct non-trivial
                 translators. Unfortunately, the code and data
                 structures produced by such generators, and hence the
                 overall parser, can be difficult to understand and
                 debug. In this paper, we present an extendible and
                 flexible tool for visualizing the operation of
                 generated parsers. The objective of this tool is to
                 provide students with a deeper understanding of parsing
                 algorithms, data structures and techniques.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Levitin:2000:DAA,
  author =       "Anany Levitin",
  title =        "Design and analysis of algorithms reconsidered",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "16--20",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331802",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "The paper elucidates two views (models) of algorithmic
                 problem solving. The first one is static; it is based
                 on the identification of several principal dimensions
                 of algorithmic problem solving. The second one is
                 dynamic, i.e., it catalogs main steps in the process of
                 solving a problem with a computer. The models are used
                 to identify several important issues in teaching design
                 and analysis of algorithms and to suggest ways of
                 rectifying the shortcomings identified.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Nguyen:2000:DPL,
  author =       "Dung Nguyen and Stephen B. Wong",
  title =        "Design patterns for lazy evaluation",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "21--25",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331803",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "We propose an object-oriented (OO) formulation and
                 implementation of lazy/delayed evaluation by reusing
                 and extending an existing linear recursive structure
                 (LRS) framework with the help of the strategy,
                 decorator and factory design patters. The result is a
                 robust, flexible framework that can handle both
                 infinite and finite lists and to which existing
                 algorithms for finite lists can be applied without
                 modification. The OO techniques used to develop this
                 model are effective tools for teaching abstraction and
                 design of data structures.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Aharoni:2000:CES,
  author =       "Dan Aharoni",
  title =        "{Cogito, Ergo sum!} cognitive processes of students
                 dealing with data structures",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "26--30",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331804",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "A research that has just recently been finished,
                 investigated thinking processes that occur in the minds
                 of students dealing with data structures. The research
                 findings are pointed out in this paper, and two of them
                 are elaborated. One is the phenomenon of
                 programming-context thinking. This type of thinking
                 stems from comparatively low level of abstraction
                 gained by students in a data structures course.
                 Programming-context thinking is the cause of other
                 phenomena found in the research, and one such
                 phenomenon --- perception of a data structure as static
                 or dynamic --- is also elaborated. Implications for
                 data structures instruction are discussed. Apart from
                 presenting the research results, this paper serves as
                 an example of cognitive research --- a kind of research
                 that is still not broadly enough done in Computer
                 Science Education. It is one purpose of this paper to
                 manifest the need for more such research.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Merzbacher:2000:TDM,
  author =       "Matthew Merzbacher",
  title =        "Teaching database management systems with {Java}",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "31--35",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331806",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "We present a multi-phase programming project, in Java,
                 for an upper-division database course. The project
                 parallels a modest reordering of the traditional
                 classroom presentation of database management. In
                 addition to illuminating theoretical concepts, the lab
                 provides a capstone experience for an undergraduate
                 computer science degree.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Robbert:2000:EVP,
  author =       "Mary Ann Robbert",
  title =        "Enhancing the value of a project in the database
                 course",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "36--40",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331807",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Data management is a crucial issue for the new
                 millennium. A database course can reflect current
                 issues and new technologies plus teach the basic
                 concepts through the use of a multiple component
                 project and reflection. This paper describes a
                 methodology to expose students to the dynamics of a
                 database environment and teach them to tract
                 theoretical principles from their experiences.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Springsteel:2000:NDD,
  author =       "Frederick Springsteel and Mary Ann Robbert and
                 Catherine M. Ricardo",
  title =        "The next decade of the database course: three decades
                 speak to the next",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "41--45",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331808",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Last year at SIGCSE'99, for the first time in recent
                 memory, a Birds-of-Feather (BOF) session for Database
                 educators was held. As some attendees noted, there had
                 not been a Database education paper accepted for that
                 or the previous SIGCSE meetings, although there had
                 been three [??page image truncated??] 1997 [12]. From
                 about two dozen educators, ``meta-data'' or data about
                 many aspects of their courses were discovered. Few had
                 paid any attention to ACM/IEEE's curriculum '91 when
                 designing their courses to fit late-century students'
                 needs. This expository paper examines, first, what was
                 the state of the Database course near the end of the
                 20$^{th}$ century, as background to a discussion of
                 what should or will be the near-term future of the
                 (first, undergraduate) Database course. From data
                 gathered mostly at the BOF and some later by email, we
                 found the following ``state of the course,'' 1998-99.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Cunningham:2000:PCC,
  author =       "Steve Cunningham",
  title =        "Powers of 10: the case for changing the first course
                 in computer graphics",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "46--49",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331809",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "The growing maturity of computer graphics technology
                 now makes it possible to view the introductory graphics
                 course in a general computer science curriculum in a
                 new light. Instead of requiring highly specialized
                 techniques and a great deal of mathematics before a
                 student can produce significant work, the course can
                 now be built around generally-accepted standard
                 graphics standard APIs. This opens the door to making
                 computer graphics available to a wider audience and
                 moves the introductory computer graphics course in
                 exciting new directions.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Sorkin:2000:CDI,
  author =       "Sylvia Sorkin and Barbara Mento and Donna Tupper and
                 Kathleen Harmeyer",
  title =        "Curriculum development in {Internet} and multimedia
                 technology",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "50--54",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331811",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Employers in business, entertainment, and education
                 seek employees to help them meet the demands for
                 web-based interactive technologies. This paper
                 describes a thirty-credit, community college
                 certificate program in Internet and Multimedia
                 Technology (I/MMT), and plans to expand it to an
                 associate's degree program. Detailed descriptions of
                 two courses, Multimedia Authoring I and Internet
                 Programming, central to the program are provided. The
                 program immerses students in a technology-rich
                 environment for their general education courses, and
                 provides internships with local multimedia and web
                 firms.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Lemmen:2000:IUP,
  author =       "Karel Lemmen and Fred Mulder and Wim Smit",
  title =        "An innovative university program on management and
                 {ICT}",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "55--59",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331812",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "In the mid nineties the idea came up to introduce a
                 University program on information and communication
                 Technology (ICT) and management aspects as a unique
                 operative project of the Open University of the
                 Netherlands, together with some colleges of higher
                 Professional education and other universities in the
                 Netherlands. The program is meant to meet the growing
                 demand for people mastering the mixture of ICT and
                 management. It aims at a specific target group of
                 students, extremely experienced professionals who have
                 already finished a higher professional education
                 program in informatics. Through the so-called MICT
                 program they can extend and upgrade their management
                 {\&} ICT knowledge, which effort --- after successful
                 completion --- is leading to a higher university
                 degree. In this paper we will describe the philosophy
                 behind the MICT program and its contents. Also we will
                 discuss its position as a university program and some
                 of the results that have emerged to date.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Hartley:2000:AYM,
  author =       "Stephen J. Hartley",
  title =        "``{Alfonse}, you have a message!''",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "60--64",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331813",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Synchronization of multiple threads in a Java program
                 using the built-in features of the language has serious
                 pitfalls for the programmer, particularly if a thread
                 is interrupted while waiting inside a monitor. These
                 concerns have lead to a movement to avoid Java monitors
                 altogether and use message passing instead. This paper
                 visits the field of concurrent programming to show that
                 replacing all Java monitors with message passing is an
                 overreaction to these problems.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Adams:2000:PCS,
  author =       "Joel Adams and Chris Nevison and Nan C. Schaller",
  title =        "Parallel computing to start the millennium",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "65--69",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331815",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "We describe the experience of three undergraduate
                 computer science programs offering courses on parallel
                 computing. In particular, we offer three different
                 solutions to the problem of equipping a lab and discuss
                 how those solutions may impact the content of the
                 course.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{McDonald:2000:TPA,
  author =       "Chris McDonald and Kamran Kazemi",
  title =        "Teaching parallel algorithm with process topologies",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "70--74",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331816",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Parallel algorithms are often introduced to students
                 by describing the geometric topologies formed by
                 communicating processes and often the geographic
                 relationships between them. However, the two most
                 common message passing environments used in teaching,
                 PVM and MPI, each provide only rudimentary support for
                 the specification and execution of process topologies.
                 There is a strong need for better syntactic and
                 semantic support for process topologies in these
                 environments, so that students may concentrate on the
                 algorithms being studied, and not have to wrestle with
                 the environments' infrastructure. This paper first
                 motivates, and then describes the use of additional
                 support within PVM and MPI which addresses this need.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Buck:2000:DEC,
  author =       "Duane Buck and David J. Stucki",
  title =        "Design early considered harmful: graduated exposure to
                 complexity and structure based on levels of cognitive
                 development",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "75--79",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331817",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "We have recognized that the natural tendency to teach
                 according to the structure of one's own understanding
                 runs contrary to established models of cognitive
                 development. Bloom's Taxonomy has provided a basis for
                 establishing a more efficacious pedagogy. Emphasizing a
                 hierarchical progression of skill sets and gradual
                 learning through example, our approach advocates
                 teaching software development from the inside/out
                 rather than beginning with either console apps or
                 monolithic designs.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Proulx:2000:PPD,
  author =       "Viera K. Proulx",
  title =        "Programming patterns and design patterns in the
                 introductory computer science course",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "80--84",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331819",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "We look at the essential thinking skills students need
                 to learn in the introductory computer science course
                 based on object-oriented programming. We create a
                 framework for such a course based on the elementary
                 programming and design patterns. Some of these patterns
                 are known in the pattern community, others enrich the
                 collection. Our goal is to help students focus on
                 mastering reasoning and design skills before the
                 language idiosyncrasies muddy the water.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Reges:2000:CRJ,
  author =       "Stuart Reges",
  title =        "Conservatively radical {Java} in {CS1}",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "85--89",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331821",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Java is fast becoming the language of choice in CSI,
                 but we have yet to figure out how to take full
                 advantage of it's special features. The conservatives
                 teach the old course in Java syntax. The radicals
                 restructure the course to include Graphical User
                 Interfaces (GUIs) and concurrency. I prefer a
                 ``conservatively radical'' middle ground where I use
                 modern GUI programs to teach the old course concepts. I
                 write GUI/concurrent code and ask my students to
                 complete the program by supplying a particular class or
                 two. Thus, they work on interesting problems without
                 having to understand the details of how my code works.
                 And in the process, they get a practical introduction
                 to the modern programming experience of writing a small
                 piece of a much larger program, allowing me to
                 emphasize abstraction early.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Vaughn:2000:AST,
  author =       "Rayford B. {Vaughn, Jr.}",
  title =        "Application of security to the computing science
                 classroom",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "90--94",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331822",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "The author of this paper was a practicing security
                 professional for over ten years in government and
                 industry before accepting a position in academia where
                 he now teaches software engineering and computer
                 security topics in graduate and undergraduate level
                 programs. Lessons learned in the transition are
                 presented along with some insights with respect to the
                 depth and breath that today's computer science student
                 is exposed to with respect to INFOSEC topics. A
                 recommendation for incorporating computer security
                 training into modern day computer science programs is
                 provided",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Siegel:2000:IIA,
  author =       "Eric V. Siegel",
  title =        "{Iambic IBM AI}: the palindrome discovery {AI}
                 project",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "95--99",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331823",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "In this paper, I describe an AI laboratory assignment
                 in which students implement standard search techniques
                 and explore heuristic measures of their own design for
                 a palindrome discovery system. The system successfully
                 derives palindromic sequences of words, many of which
                 are meaningful, and achieves what is to the author's
                 knowledge the first automatic generation of
                 palindromes. Code is made available to students which
                 implements the state space for palindrome search. This
                 makes a large-scale problem accessible to introductory
                 AI students by harnessing their knowledge of natural
                 language. Students were motivated by the intrigue of
                 discovering new palindromes.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Congdon:2000:MLL,
  author =       "Clare Bates Congdon",
  title =        "Machine learning in the liberal arts curriculum",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "100--104",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331824",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Machine learning is typically considered a
                 graduate-level course with an artificial intelligence
                 course as a prerequisite. However, it does not need to
                 be positioned this way, and in the liberal arts
                 curriculum in particular, there are advantages to
                 offering this course to undergraduate students. An
                 undergraduate course in machine learning is easily and
                 naturally structured to introduce research concepts and
                 to work within a research paradigm. It also introduces
                 the use of statistics, reflected both in the machine
                 learning systems studied and in the experimental
                 methodology. Furthermore, it allows for an
                 interdisciplinary perspective, as students can be
                 encouraged to work on problems from other departments
                 in the college. This paper describes the benefits of
                 offering such a course and outlines a course structure
                 and resources for doing so.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Cheatham:2000:WBL,
  author =       "Thomas J. Cheatham",
  title =        "A {Web}-based lab manual for {CS 1}: an experiment",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "105--108",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331828",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "No one can deny the impact the web is having on
                 education. Computer Science education is no exception.
                 Computer literacy classes now include units on web
                 surfing and personal web page creation [6]. Data
                 structures students have web tools for viewing
                 algorithms and dynamic data structures [2, 4-5].
                 Computer graphics students have 2D and 3D visualization
                 tools [7], and database students learn to access remote
                 databases using ODBC or JDBC over the web [1]. Special
                 courses in web technologies are being added to the
                 curriculum in many departments [3]. It is only natural
                 for a laboratory manual for Computer Science 1 to be
                 presented as an interactive web document.
                 Pedagogically, how does such a laboratory manual
                 compare with the traditional hard-copy manual? What are
                 its strengths and weaknesses? Which approach do
                 students prefer? We sought to answer these and other
                 questions from our empirical study of Computer Science
                 I students. The results of the study and the lessons
                 learned will be described in this article.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Naps:2000:JEA,
  author =       "Thomas L. Naps and James R. Eagan and Laura L.
                 Norton",
  title =        "{JHAV{\'E}} --- an environment to actively engage
                 students in {Web}-based algorithm visualizations",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "109--113",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331829",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "In this paper, we describe JHAV{\'E} (Java-hosted
                 Algorithm Visualization Environment), a client-server
                 environment for delivering algorithm visualizations
                 over the Web. The first section of the paper briefly
                 summarizes prior research by a variety of investigators
                 into the pedagogical effectiveness of algorithm
                 visualization (AV). The design goals of JHAV{\'E} are
                 then placed in the context of this research. After a
                 discussion of some technical details of the JHAV{\'E}
                 architecture, we present two examples of algorithms
                 depicted in JHAV{\'E}. The results of students'
                 exploring these algorithms with JHAV{\'E} are analyzed.
                 We close with a discussion of the general conclusions
                 reached from our current work and future directions in
                 which it may lead.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Robbins:2000:RLJ,
  author =       "Steven Robbins",
  title =        "Remote logging in {Java} using {Jeli}: a facility to
                 enhance development of accessible educational
                 software",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "114--118",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331830",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "The combination of Java and the World Wide Web has
                 opened up new opportunities for teaching at all levels.
                 It is now possible to assume that all students in a
                 class have access to the web through a browser that
                 supports the Java language and a standard subset of the
                 GUI API. One of the drawbacks of using Java through a
                 browser is the lack of a standardized safe way for a
                 Java applet to access resources on the local machine.
                 Security measures prevent the applet from storing
                 information generated by the applet on the local
                 machine. The Jeli package contains a logging facility
                 that allows an applet to store files either locally (if
                 permitted) or on the server from which the applet was
                 loaded. Jeli logging makes it significantly easier for
                 instructors to develop applets that can permanently
                 store information generated by user interaction with
                 the application. The log can then be used by the
                 student for study or the instructor for grading.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Michael:2000:FAC,
  author =       "Mark Michael",
  title =        "Fostering and assessing communication skills in the
                 computer science context",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "119--123",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331834",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "In accord with a college-wide assessment program at
                 the author's institution, a required major course
                 approximately midway through a student's college career
                 forms the matrix for an intensive project which both
                 develops and evaluates the student's communication
                 skills in discipline-specific ways. For Computer
                 Science majors, the project is a component of a
                 junior-level Advanced Object-Oriented Programming
                 course. Though centered about a semester-long
                 programming project, it involves expectations,
                 guidance, and feedback beyond what is traditional. This
                 assessment instrument has a minimal impact on class
                 time and course content, substantial impact on faculty
                 and student effort, and tremendous impact on
                 learning.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Gabbert:2000:EUP,
  author =       "Paula Gabbert and Kevin Treu",
  title =        "Experiments with the use of popular press in the
                 computer science curriculum",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "124--128",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331839",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "With the objective of encouraging and supporting more
                 critical thinking about broad issues of computer
                 science throughout the curriculum, we propose the
                 widespread use of popular press (non-academic) books as
                 supplemental texts for a variety of courses. Our
                 hypothesis is that such books, which address topics
                 including the history, current issues, and future
                 implications of computing technology, as well as
                 ethical issues, technical details and even fictional
                 treatments, can greatly contribute to a student's
                 education in a variety of courses.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Clark:2000:GPT,
  author =       "Martyn Clark",
  title =        "Getting participation through discussion",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "129--133",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331841",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Student participation is a vital component of any
                 taught course. Where the course is concerned with the
                 learning and teaching of theories and concepts, as
                 opposed to skills and experiences, the key activity in
                 which students can participate is discussion. In large
                 classes it is impossible for teachers to engage every
                 student in discussion but they can talk to each other.
                 This paper relates one teacher's experience over two
                 years of trying to encourage students to discuss
                 concepts such as systems and information using
                 electronic bulletin boards. The paper focuses on how
                 the exercise has evolved over time in response to
                 reflection on experience and suggests some guidelines
                 for making a success of this type of exercise.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Rossling:2000:EUA,
  author =       "Guido R{\"o}{\ss}ling and Bernd Freisleben",
  title =        "Experiences in using animations in introductory
                 computer science lectures",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "134--138",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331842",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Algorithm animation has received much interest over
                 the last few years. In this paper, we discuss the
                 experiences gained in integrating animations into
                 introductory computer science courses with large
                 audiences of more than 200 students. After providing a
                 short introduction to the animation tool we developed,
                 we describe why and how we used animations in our
                 lectures and present some example animations.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Bridgeman:2000:PIT,
  author =       "Stina Bridgeman and Michael T. Goodrich and Stephen G.
                 Kobourov and Roberto Tamassia",
  title =        "{PILOT}: an interactive tool for learning and
                 grading",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "139--143",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331843",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "We describe a Web-based interactive system, called
                 PILOT, for testing computer science concepts. The
                 strengths of PILOT are its universal access and
                 platform independence, its use as an algorithm
                 visualization tool, its ability to test algorithmic
                 concepts, its support for graph generation and layout,
                 its automated grading mechanism, and its ability to
                 award partial credit to proposed solutions.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Fekete:2000:SRI,
  author =       "Alan Fekete and Judy Kay and Jeff Kingston and Kapila
                 Wimalaratne",
  title =        "Supporting reflection in introductory computer
                 science",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "144--148",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331844",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Educational theory suggests that student learning is
                 enhanced when students pay attention to their own
                 learning. In this paper, we describe a range of
                 innovative techniques that we use to encourage students
                 to reflect on the state of their knowledge, and on the
                 process by which they acquire it. Examples include
                 providing web-based arrangements for students to
                 practice assessing material based on the criteria we
                 use in marking, and allocating marks in assessment for
                 reflective writing.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Greening:2000:PSR,
  author =       "Tony Greening",
  title =        "Pedagogically sound responses to economic
                 rationalism",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "149--156",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331845",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Economic rationalism, which rests decision-making
                 power with market forces, has established a ubiquitous
                 presence on a global scale. Certainly, educational
                 administrators are feeling the effects of economic
                 rationalist policies and in turn make managerial
                 decisions that reflect this essence to the practising
                 academic and, ultimately, to the classroom. The effect
                 is often one of despair. Teaching --- long pitted
                 against other roles of the academic, such as research
                 --- now faces additional threats from the pressures to
                 operate in this environment, often regarded as
                 antagonistic to the traditional values of liberal
                 university education. This paper discusses the nature
                 of economic rationalism using the Australian context as
                 an example, and presents some means by which teaching
                 in computer science may respond to this threat in
                 pedagogically sound ways. Such negotiations are
                 essential in approaching a future for CS education in
                 which this policy context is almost guaranteed.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Sobel:2000:ERS,
  author =       "Ann E. Kelley Sobel",
  title =        "Empirical results of a software engineering curriculum
                 incorporating formal methods",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "157--161",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331846",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "A three year study of integrating formal methods into
                 the undergraduate software engineering curriculum of
                 the Systems Analysis Department of Miami University was
                 recently completed (NSF Educational Innovation Program
                 CDA-9522257). Formal analysis skills were added to the
                 curriculum to address the concern that the discipline
                 of software engineering education lacks sufficient
                 emphasis on mathematics and engineering science. A
                 presentation of the six courses chosen for integration
                 of formal analysis is given. The empirical data which
                 directly compares the problem solving skills of the
                 formal methods and control student groups shows that
                 the formal methods students possess an increased level
                 of complex problem solving skills as well as a greater
                 ability to perform problem abstraction.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Concepcion:2000:AER,
  author =       "Arturo I. Concepcion and Nathan Leach and Allan
                 Knight",
  title =        "{Algorithma 99}: an experiment in reusability {\&}
                 component based software engineering",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "162--166",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331847",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "This paper reports on our experience in achieving
                 reusability and using component-based software
                 engineering in the Algorithma 99 (Algorithm Animation)
                 Project. We show how we extended and reused Algorithma
                 98 [2] into Algorithma 99 and how we prepared
                 Algorithma 99 to be reused in Algorithma 2000 (to be
                 implemented in Winter 2000). Component-based software
                 engineering is not only confined to binary components,
                 such as COM and CORBA, but is also applicable to
                 software processes, architectures and design, and
                 object-oriented libraries.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Hilburn:2000:SQC,
  author =       "Thomas B. Hilburn and Massood Townhidnejad",
  title =        "Software quality: a curriculum postscript?",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "167--171",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331848",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "This paper addresses a central and critical issue in
                 the development of computer software --- its quality.
                 The main thesis of the paper is that computer science
                 faculty, in their design and implementation of
                 curricula, do not devote sufficient attention to
                 teaching their students how to develop high-quality
                 software. As in industry, the most common and popular
                 way of assuring the quality of programs is through
                 software testing. In other words, quality is treated as
                 an afterthought or as postscript in program
                 development. The paper presents and discusses a quality
                 model that can be used to incorporate a wide variety of
                 quality assurance techniques within a curriculum. The
                 model also presents a structured approach for
                 introducing software testing into the educational
                 environment. Finally, there is a discussion of how the
                 model has been implemented using two current software
                 process technologies, the PSP and the TSP.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Wilkins:2000:EIT,
  author =       "Dawn E. Wilkins and Pamela B. Lawhead",
  title =        "Evaluating individuals in team projects",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "172--175",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331849",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "In 1999, most computer science students participate in
                 at least one group project in some class prior to
                 graduation. However, assessing individual student
                 contributions to a group project is a difficult task
                 faced by instructors of these classes. In this paper,
                 we have compiled a wide range of assessment
                 instruments, and identified situations where they can
                 be effective. This paper is a compilation of potential
                 evaluation strategies. No comparison is made among the
                 many strategies nor are particular techniques ranked
                 above or below others. The goal is simply to provide a
                 wide range of potential team evaluation techniques.
                 Since each technique evaluates a particular
                 characteristic and different team project courses have
                 different goals it is up to the instructor to choose
                 the techniques that best evaluate the individual in
                 light of the course goals.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Andersson:2000:ESL,
  author =       "Roy Andersson and Torgny Rox{\aa}",
  title =        "Encouraging students in large classes",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "176--179",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331850",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Our experiences and results of encouraging our
                 students in a large CSI course to keep up with the pace
                 of the course at a reasonable cost for us are
                 presented. We have successfully managed to pinpoint
                 students who are about to fall into the anonymity and
                 passivity trap and give them the extra attention they
                 need to avoid the trap when they need it. Since we
                 managed to pinpoint the most needing students we can
                 give them the extra personal recognition and
                 encouragement they need at a very reasonable cost in
                 the perspective of the whole course. For the two years
                 we have tried our concept we can see a significant
                 increase in the pass rate of the final exam.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Vandenberg:2000:ICS,
  author =       "Scott Vandenberg and Michael Wollowski",
  title =        "Introducing computer science using a breadth-first
                 approach and functional programming",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "180--184",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331851",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "We present a breadth-first, lecture- and lab-based
                 approach to introducing Computer Science that uses
                 functional programming. Functional programming provides
                 a low-overhead introduction to programming (no types,
                 few constructs, and little syntax), enabling students
                 to write, in their first semester, programs
                 sophisticated enough to exemplify important concepts of
                 Computer Science. It also encourages good programming
                 style (modular design and testing, e.g.) and serves as
                 an introduction to an important problem-solving
                 paradigm. The course gives the students a broad
                 overview of Computer Science and helps them gauge their
                 interest in the field.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Rasala:2000:TFY,
  author =       "Richard Rasala",
  title =        "Toolkits in first year computer science: a pedagogical
                 imperative",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "185--191",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331852",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Traditional first year computer science courses teach
                 the principles of computing using the basic features of
                 some chosen programming language such as C, C++, Java,
                 Ada, Scheme, Eiffel, etc. Abstraction and encapsulation
                 focus on entities such as algorithms, functions, data
                 structures, classes, objects, and closures that can be
                 built directly on top of the raw language. If a
                 facility such as windows and graphics is not directly
                 available in the language then it is not used. This
                 means that student exercises tend to look inward at
                 computer science issues rather than outward to the
                 exciting applications that show the breadth and power
                 of computing. The fundamental thesis of this article is
                 that teaching students in the framework of powerful
                 toolkits is essential to maintain student interest and
                 is pedagogically important precisely because toolkits
                 are a rich source of examples that illustrate the
                 principles of computation. We hope to convince computer
                 science faculty that the use of toolkits is imperative
                 in a modern first year curriculum. We will first
                 discuss in general why toolkits are important. We will
                 spice this discussion with some simple illustrations
                 and with references to the use of toolkits by faculty
                 at other institutions. We will then describe the
                 toolkits we have developed at Northeastern University
                 and explain both what they do and why they are
                 pedagogically valuable. We will see how toolkits enable
                 students to do more interesting and effective work and
                 how principles of design and algorithms can be
                 demonstrated by the key components of the toolkits. We
                 will conclude with some general remarks and explain why
                 the arguments made against toolkits do not have
                 sufficient weight to change our conclusions. We will
                 also give the web site address where our toolkits are
                 available.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Rebelsky:2000:RWP,
  author =       "Samuel A. Rebelsky and Clif Flynt",
  title =        "Real-world program design in {CS2}: the roles of a
                 large-scale, multi-group class project",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "192--196",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331853",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Recent curricular recommendations (e.g., [7,9])
                 encourage the early and regular use of significant
                 group projects in the introductory computer science
                 sequence. In this paper, we report on a group project
                 that we used in two courses during the second half of
                 the semester. Rather than having each group work on the
                 same project (or even individual projects), the groups
                 build parts of a larger project: a distributed auction
                 system to be used by art shows at conventions. Students
                 reacted quite positively to the experience, in spite of
                 reporting that they spent upwards of twenty hours on
                 the project in many weeks. Students also learned
                 important software design principles from experience.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Fleury:2000:PJS,
  author =       "Ann E. Fleury",
  title =        "Programming in {Java}: student-constructed rules",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "197--201",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331854",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Java is becoming a popular first programming language
                 for university students. One reason for its popularity
                 is its power as an object-oriented language. This study
                 examined beginning students' understanding of the
                 construction and use of objects in Java. During
                 tape-recorded interviews, students were asked to
                 predict which programs from a collection of similar
                 programs would work according to specification and
                 which would not. This paper will discuss those
                 interviews, including the most common false assumptions
                 or ``student-constructed rules'' invoked by the
                 students and the implications of the interviews for
                 instruction.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Reed:2000:EIT,
  author =       "David Reed and Craig Miller and Grant Braught",
  title =        "Empirical investigation throughout the {CS}
                 curriculum",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "202--206",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331855",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Empirical skills are playing an increasingly important
                 role in the computing profession and our society. But
                 while traditional computer science curricula are
                 effective in teaching software design skills, little
                 attention has been paid to developing empirical
                 investigative skills such as forming testable
                 hypotheses, designing experiments, critiquing their
                 validity, collecting data, explaining results, and
                 drawing conclusions. In this paper, we describe an
                 initiative at Dickinson College that integrates the
                 development of empirical skills throughout the computer
                 science curriculum. At the introductory level, students
                 perform experiments, analyze the results, and discuss
                 their conclusions. In subsequent courses, they develop
                 their skills at designing, conducting and critiquing
                 experiments through incrementally more open-ended
                 assignments. By their senior year, they are capable of
                 forming hypotheses, designing and conducting
                 experiments, and presenting conclusions based on the
                 results.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Gibbs:2000:ECL,
  author =       "David C. Gibbs",
  title =        "The effect of a constructivist learning environment
                 for field-dependent\slash independent students on
                 achievement in introductory computer programming",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "207--211",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331856",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Research was conducted to determine the effect of a
                 constructivist learning environment upon field
                 dependent (FD) and field independent (FI) students'
                 achievement in an introductory computer programming
                 course. Prior research in traditional environments had
                 established a correlation between field dependence /
                 independence (FD/I) and the design stage of
                 programming. A correlational design was followed, using
                 introductory computer science students in their first
                 programming course. A pretest of BASIC programming
                 ability was given to assess baseline proficiency. The
                 Group Embedded Figures Test (GEFT) was given to assess
                 each subject's measure of FD/I. A constructivist model
                 for learning programming was implemented. Achievement
                 tests in two of the stages of programming, design and
                 coding were administered. As additional dependent
                 variables, student construction of programming elements
                 --- the design (semantic) elements, and the
                 language-specific coding (syntax) elements --- were
                 collected in a portfolio and examined for both
                 qualitative and quantitative differences. No
                 significant correlations were found between FD/I and
                 the achievement scores of design and coding. No
                 correlation was expected between FD/I and coding. There
                 was no interaction between FD/I and design versus
                 coding. The correlation between FD/I and the quantity
                 of reconstructed programming elements was not
                 significant. The correlation between FD/I and the
                 quality of reconstructed programming elements was not
                 significant. No interaction was found between FD/I and
                 the quantity or quality of semantic versus syntactic
                 elements. Stepwise multiple regression identified two
                 predictors, for design, the predictor was the pretest.
                 Coding was predicted by the quantity of syntactic
                 programming elements. The principal finding of this
                 research, in contrast to findings in traditional
                 environments is that within this constructivist
                 environment, the cognitive style of FD/I was not found
                 to influence programming achievement.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Chamillard:2000:EPA,
  author =       "A. T. Chamillard and Kim A. Braun",
  title =        "Evaluating programming ability in an introductory
                 computer science course",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "212--216",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331857",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "There are numerous ways to evaluate student
                 programming ability, all of which have benefits and
                 drawbacks. In this paper we discuss how we have
                 combined a number of those evaluation techniques to
                 assess student programming ability in an introductory
                 computer science course and statistically analyze the
                 relationships of student performance using the
                 different evaluation techniques.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Bowyer:2000:VRU,
  author =       "Kevin Bowyer",
  title =        "Video resources for use in teaching ethics and
                 computing",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "217--221",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331858",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Workshops on the theme of ``Teaching Ethics and
                 Computing'' were sponsored by the National Science
                 Foundation's Undergraduate Faculty Enhancement program.
                 This paper outlines the results of the workshops,
                 available at marathon.csee.usf.edu/~kwb/naf-ufe/.
                 Preparation for the workshops included a survey of
                 videos that are potentially useful in teaching ethics
                 and computing. This paper reviews some of the ``best
                 of'' these videos.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Sanderson:2000:PAS,
  author =       "Pete Sanderson and Ken Vollmar",
  title =        "A primer for applying service learning to computer
                 science",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "222--226",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331859",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Service learning is an educational philosophy that
                 promotes active learning through community service. We
                 have recently applied this approach in our computer
                 science curriculum, specifically to our software
                 engineering course. In order that other computer
                 science departments can benefit from our experience, we
                 have developed a primer one can follow to establish a
                 program for service learning in the computer sciences.
                 We also describe and assess our experience after one
                 year of applying service learning to software
                 engineering.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Sanders:2000:FBC,
  author =       "Ian Sanders and Conrad Mueller",
  title =        "A fundamentals-based curriculum for first year
                 computer science",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "227--231",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331860",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "At Wits we are concerned about offering a good
                 computer science degree but at the same time making our
                 degree programme accessible to all students who have
                 the potential or ability to cope with the material.
                 This paper discusses a new first year curriculum which
                 has been developed to address some of the problems
                 which the course that we offered from 1990 to 1998,
                 with minimal changes, has begun to encounter. The most
                 important of these problems is that of student
                 perceptions of our old course. The new course stresses
                 fundamentals of computer science and is structured
                 around teaching basic principles and competencies.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Tesser:2000:IMS,
  author =       "Herbert Tesser and Hisham Al-Haddad and Gary
                 Anderson",
  title =        "Instrumentation: a multi-science integrated sequence",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "232--236",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331861",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "A new method of teaching traditional concepts of
                 CS1-CS2 is discussed. The new method uses real-time
                 data acquisition, teaming, and interdisciplinary
                 courseware to illustrate basic computer science
                 concepts. We present a series of experiments and the
                 corresponding software engineering elements. These
                 experiments have proved to be motivating for a broad
                 spectrum of students.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Rayside:2000:AOO,
  author =       "Derek Rayside and Gerard T. Campbell",
  title =        "{Aristotle} and object-oriented programming: why
                 modern students need traditional logic",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "237--244",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331862",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Classifying is a central activity in object-oriented
                 programming and distinguishes it from procedural
                 programming. Traditional logic, initiated by Aristotle,
                 assigns classification to our first activity in
                 reasoning, whereby we come to know what a thing is.
                 Such a grasp of the thing's whatness is the foundation
                 for all further reasoning about it. This connection
                 between Aristotle's way of classifying and
                 object-oriented programming is sometimes acknowledged,
                 but rarely explored in depth.$^1$ We explore this
                 relation more closely and more carefully, in the hope
                 that a better understanding of classification and
                 programming can be gained from a study of philosophy
                 than from many current text books on object-oriented
                 programming.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Lewis:2000:MAO,
  author =       "John Lewis",
  title =        "Myths about object-orientation and its pedagogy",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "245--249",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331863",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Object-orientation continues to find a home in
                 computing curricula, especially in early courses such
                 as CS1. As this trend continues, some ideas seem to
                 take on a life of their own, despite being
                 fundamentally incorrect. Unfortunately they propagate
                 most quickly among those who are relatively new to the
                 ideas of object-oriented development. This paper
                 enumerates and debates the underlying issues of several
                 myths regarding object-orientation and its pedagogy.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Ge:2000:CCS,
  author =       "Yuzhen Ge and Jiangeng Sun",
  title =        "{E}-commerce and computer science education",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "250--255",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331864",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Electronic commerce is gradually changing the way the
                 commerce is conducted. Computer science graduates will
                 need to be prepared for the challenge posed by the
                 increasing demand for professionals who can develop and
                 maintain electronic commerce systems. By examining the
                 standard computer science curriculum, some suggestions
                 are proposed.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Richards:2000:BFT,
  author =       "Brad Richards",
  title =        "Bugs as features: teaching network protocols through
                 debugging",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "256--259",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331865",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Being exposed to well-written code is a valuable
                 experience for students-especially when the code is
                 larger or more complex than they are currently capable
                 of writing. In addition to the mechanics of a
                 particular computation, students learn organization and
                 documentation skills, and general concepts illustrated
                 by the specific program. However, to obtain these
                 benefits, students must thoroughly familiarize
                 themselves with the code. This paper describes recent
                 successes using software bugs as a means to force
                 familiarization with network protocol code. The bugs
                 become tools by which the students learn the inner
                 workings of network protocols. As a side benefit, the
                 approach provides a concrete basis for the discussion
                 of debugging approaches and techniques. The technique
                 is appropriate for any course involving programming,
                 and is especially good for upper-level courses like
                 networks, operating systems, and parallel and
                 distributed programming, where difficult concepts can
                 be illustrated via sample programs.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Jones:2000:DIC,
  author =       "Randolph M. Jones",
  title =        "Design and implementation of computer games: a
                 capstone course for undergraduate computer science
                 education",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "260--264",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331866",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "This paper presents a course in the design and
                 implementation of computer games, offered as an
                 upper-division computer science course at Colby College
                 during the winter semester, 1999. The paper describes
                 the material, topics, and projects included in the
                 course. More generally, I argue that this course
                 provides an ideal environment for students to integrate
                 a wide base of computer knowledge and skills. The paper
                 supports this argument by presenting the variety of
                 computer science concepts covered in the course, as
                 well as pointing out potential areas of variation in
                 future courses, depending on the tastes and priorities
                 of the instructor.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Tuttle:2000:CCC,
  author =       "Sharon M. Tuttle",
  title =        "A capstone course for a computer information systems
                 major",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "265--269",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331867",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "This paper describes the current form and organization
                 of Humboldt State University's CIS 492: Systems Design
                 and Implementation, the capstone course for the
                 Computer Information Systems (CIS) major. Since Spring
                 1998, this course has combined a team programming
                 experience on a large-scale database project with
                 discussions of a software engineering classic,
                 Frederick Brooks Jr.'s ``The Mythical Man Month''[1].
                 Students seem to find this combination valuable, and it
                 is hoped that this paper can impart some useful ideas
                 to others in designing a CIS/MIS capstone course.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Mosiman:2000:ICG,
  author =       "Steve Mosiman and Christoph Hiemcke",
  title =        "Interdisciplinary capstone group project: designing
                 autonomous race vehicles",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "270--274",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331868",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "We, the authors, have each managed group projects for
                 our respective senior majors for some time. Three years
                 ago we combined the senior courses and each project
                 team is now composed of both computer science and
                 engineering majors. We were motivated by the desire to
                 broaden the senior experience in both disciplines as
                 well as to use the projects to attract prospective
                 majors. The most recent project was to build autonomous
                 line-tracking vehicles for racing. Since the computer
                 scientists do not necessarily have any exposure to
                 analog circuits and the engineers have only limited
                 knowledge, it was necessary to provide an environment
                 that required little analog design. The Handy Board [7]
                 proved to be a useful part of that environment. This
                 paper discusses our experience teaching an
                 interdisciplinary group project-oriented course,
                 discusses strengths and weaknesses of using the Handy
                 Board in this context, and draws some conclusions based
                 on our experience.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Countermine:2000:IIC,
  author =       "Terry Countermine and Phil Pfeiffer",
  title =        "Implementing an {IT} concentration in a {CS}
                 department: content, rationale, and initial impact",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "275--279",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331869",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "The increasing use of commercial off-the-shelf (COTS)
                 software has created a demand for IT
                 professionals-people that build and manage systems
                 assembled from COTS components. In Fall 1999, the ETSU
                 Dept. of CIS started a program of study for training IT
                 professionals. This IT concentration differs from
                 existing concentrations in four key ways:The IT
                 concentration emphasizes VB instead of C++.It
                 emphasizes web, database, and networking applications
                 instead of systems software;It puts more emphasis on
                 human issues in computing: ethics, computer-assisted
                 instruction, and systems analysis and specification;It
                 deemphasizes science and math, giving students more
                 opportunity to complete a minor of their choosing. Key
                 design criteria for the concentration included making
                 the content practical and attractive; teaching
                 short-term and long-term skills; and minimizing the
                 need for additional faculty. This final concern was
                 addressed by reworking selected courses in computer
                 organization, databases, networking, and software
                 engineering for the concentration. The new
                 concentration should meet the needs of students and
                 employers while improving retention and increasing
                 enrollment. Preliminary indications suggest that the IT
                 will become the department's most popular
                 concentration.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Aiken:2000:FIT,
  author =       "Robert Aiken and Ned Kock and Munir Mandviwalla",
  title =        "Fluency in information technology: a second course for
                 non-{CIS} majors",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "280--284",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331870",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Spooner:2000:BSI,
  author =       "David L. Spooner",
  title =        "A {Bachelor of Science in Information Technology}: an
                 interdisciplinary approach",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "285--289",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331871",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Rensselaer has launched a new Bachelor of Science
                 degree program in Information Technology [4,5]. This
                 degree is an alternative to the more traditional
                 computer science or computer systems degrees that
                 Rensselaer continues to offer. It focuses on the
                 application of computing and communications
                 technologies in a student-chosen application area
                 called a second discipline. The expectation is that a
                 company doing business in the second discipline or
                 closely related area will employ a student completing
                 this degree. This paper describes the motivation behind
                 the new degree program and its interdisciplinary
                 approach. It also presents the organization of the
                 curriculum and its requirements.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Elenbogen:2000:YMW,
  author =       "Bruce S. Elenbogen and Bruce R. Maxim and Chris
                 McDonald",
  title =        "Yet, more {Web} exercises for learning {C++}",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "290--294",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331872",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "This paper describes a set of author developed
                 interactive web exercises and a development environment
                 designed to facilitate language acquisition in a
                 beginning course in C++. The exercises test the
                 students' understanding of several C++ language
                 constructs as well as general programming concepts such
                 as scope of variables. The environment allows students
                 to write and test sections of code in a instructor
                 controlled setting. Together the exercises and
                 environment can be used to enhance computer science
                 education for both traditional and distance learning
                 students. The paradigm of generalization and automation
                 of standard exercises can be extended to facilitate web
                 education in other courses.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Roberts:2000:SEI,
  author =       "Eric Roberts",
  title =        "Strategies for encouraging individual achievement in
                 introductory computer science courses",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "295--299",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331873",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Students in introductory computer science courses
                 often vary widely in background and ability. As a
                 result, some students are bored by the pace of
                 presentation, while others struggle to keep up. This
                 paper describes our experience using open-ended
                 assignments and programming contests to capture the
                 interest of our strongest students without adversely
                 affecting the educational experience for the other
                 students in the class. This approach has been markedly
                 successful, particularly for highly motivated students,
                 who are often able to work well beyond the level of the
                 class. The paper also includes a survey of student
                 reactions to the various extra-credit opportunities,
                 which indicates that many student value this component
                 of the class even if they do not participate directly
                 in these activities.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Bridgeman:2000:SSG,
  author =       "Stina Bridgeman and Michael T. Goodrich and Stephen G.
                 Kobourov and Roberto Tamassia",
  title =        "{SAIL}: a system for generating, archiving, and
                 retrieving specialized assignments using {{\LaTeX}}",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "300--304",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331874",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "In this paper we present a package for the creation of
                 Specialized Assignments In L$^A$T$_E$X, SAIL. We
                 describe several features which allow an instructor to
                 create sufficiently different instances of the ``same''
                 problem so as to encourage student cooperation without
                 fear of plagiarism. The SAIL package also provides
                 support for grading aids and grading automation. In
                 addition, we describe an on-line system for archiving
                 homework problems in a database that can be easily
                 searched and to which new parametrized problems can be
                 easily added. Together, the SAIL package and the
                 searchable database of problems offer a powerful tool
                 for generating, archiving, and retrieving homework
                 assignments (as well as tests and quizzes).",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{George:2000:EVR,
  author =       "Carlisle E. George",
  title =        "{EROSI} --- visualising recursion and discovering new
                 errors",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "305--309",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331875",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "This paper introduces a novel software visualisation
                 aid, the EROSI (Explicit Representer Of Subprogram
                 Invocations) tutor, hypothesised to support the
                 acquisition (by novice programmers) of a mental model
                 to facilitate the comprehension and use of recursion as
                 a problem solving technique. Novices found the EROSI
                 tutor easy to use, interesting and a valuable
                 visualisation aid to forming correct mental models of
                 recursive processes. Studies concluded that although
                 novices many have a correct mental model of recursion,
                 various errors and misconceptions (identified) due to
                 exogenous factors affect their ability to complete
                 recursive tasks.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Velazquez-Iturbide:2000:RGS,
  author =       "J. {\'A}ngel Vel{\'a}zquez-Iturbide",
  title =        "Recursion in gradual steps (is recursion really that
                 difficult?)",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "310--314",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331876",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "We propose a gradual approach to teach recursion. Our
                 main assumption is that the difficulty in learning
                 recursion does not come from the recursion concept
                 itself, but from its interaction with other mechanisms
                 of imperative programming. We use this basic idea to
                 propose a new pedagogical approach. On the one hand,
                 recursion is introduced in a gradual way by means of
                 three fields (grammars, functional programming and
                 imperative programming). On the other hand, each
                 instance of recursion is explained so that all of its
                 accompanying mechanisms are clearly identified. The
                 approach has three main advantages. First, the teaching
                 of recursion is simplified because it is taught in a
                 gradual way. Second, the concept of recursion is
                 isolated and differentiated from other concepts or
                 mechanisms associated to particular instances of
                 recursion. Last, the student perceives recursion as a
                 recurrent concept in the discipline of computer
                 science.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Levy:2000:RSA,
  author =       "Dalit Levy and Tami Lapidot",
  title =        "Recursively speaking: analyzing students' discourse of
                 recursive phenomena",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "315--319",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331877",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Recursion is a powerful concept, appearing in almost
                 every introductory course in computer-science (CS). CS
                 educators and educational researchers often refer to
                 difficulties in learning recursion, and suggest methods
                 for teaching recursion. However, the research
                 literature barely addresses the unique ways in which
                 students relate to this interdisciplinary concept and
                 the particular learners' language concerning recursive
                 phenomena. The gap is most apparent when seen through a
                 constructivist lens, where the students' prior
                 knowledge and idiosyncratic conceptions should be
                 referred to and reflected upon in order to serve as a
                 basis for further knowledge construction. This paper
                 reports on a study in which a collaborative
                 classification of several recursive phenomena is used
                 to facilitate the construction of recursion. The
                 students' discourse was analyzed, as a step toward
                 understanding the students' ways of speaking
                 recursively. Preliminary results indicate some basic
                 aspects of recursion in the student discourse, although
                 the students apparently talk a very different language
                 from that of the experts, as used by books and
                 teachers.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Dickinson:2000:OSP,
  author =       "John Dickinson",
  title =        "Operating systems projects built on a simple hardware
                 simulator",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "320--324",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331878",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Effective teaching of operating system concepts
                 requires projects. This paper describes a series of
                 operating system projects all based on a simple
                 hardware simulator that have been used to teach
                 operating system concepts at the undergraduate level. A
                 key feature of this approach is the use of a simple but
                 realistic hardware model upon which an operating system
                 is progressively built. The hardware simulator evolves
                 as the operating system evolves.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Choi:2000:SCP,
  author =       "Sung-Eun Choi and E. Christopher Lewis",
  title =        "A study of common pitfalls in simple multi-threaded
                 programs",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "325--329",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331879",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "It is generally acknowledged that developing correct
                 multi-threaded codes is difficult, because threads may
                 interact with each other in unpredictable ways. The
                 goal of this work is to discover common multi-threaded
                 programming pitfalls, the knowledge of which will be
                 useful in instructing new programmers and in developing
                 tools to aid in multi-threaded programming. To this
                 end, we study multi-threaded applications written by
                 students from introductory operating systems courses.
                 Although the applications are simple, careful
                 inspection and the use of an automatic race detection
                 tool reveal a surprising quantity and variety of
                 synchronization errors. We describe and discuss these
                 errors, evaluate the role of automated tools, and
                 propose new tools for use in the instruction of
                 multi-threaded programming.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Robbins:2000:EBB,
  author =       "Steven Robbins",
  title =        "Experimentation with bounded buffer synchronization",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "330--334",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331880",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Undergraduates are usually introduced to
                 synchronization in operating systems through a
                 discussion of classical problems such as reader-writer
                 or producers-consumers. The traditional approach to
                 teaching these topics is not effective in conveying to
                 students how programs with incorrect synchronization
                 actually behave. This paper introduces a simple
                 probabilistic model for synchronization failure and
                 shows how students can empirically study these issues.
                 These activities are supported by a simulator that
                 students can use to explore synchronization in the
                 context of the bounded buffer problem. The simulator is
                 written in Java and can be used either standalone or
                 from a standard browser. Students can save the data and
                 graphs generated by the simulator in a log file in HTML
                 format.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Gerhardt-Powals:2000:DEL,
  author =       "Jill Gerhardt-Powals and Matthew H. Powals",
  title =        "Distance education: law attempts to catch up with
                 technology (battle between copyright owners and
                 academics)",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "335--342",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331881",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Late last year President Clinton signed into law the
                 Digital Millennium Copyright Act. It was a far reaching
                 attempt to update copyright law in order to keep pace
                 with the digital environment by providing new rules for
                 downloading, sharing, or simply viewing copyrighted
                 material on-line Some cheered the passage of The Act
                 and others lamented it. For the software and
                 entertainment industries it was a triumph because now
                 they can market their products on-line without fear of
                 piracy. However many, including academics, educators,
                 and researchers, view The Act as a set back, even an
                 assault, on their traditional access to and use of
                 information. The balancing of conflicting needs of the
                 copyright owners and the users of copyrighted
                 materials, while applying the copyright law to the
                 emerging technology of today, is truly an evolving and
                 a daunting process. Included in The Act was a mandate
                 to the Register of Copyrights to consult with
                 representatives of copyright owners, nonprofit
                 educational institutions, and nonprofit libraries and
                 archives, and submit to Congress recommendations on how
                 to promote distance education through digital
                 technologies, including interactive digital networks,
                 while maintaining an appropriate balance between the
                 rights of copyright owners and the needs of users of
                 copyrighted works. The purpose of this paper is to
                 place The Register of Copyrights Study in its
                 historical environment and describe the recommendations
                 of The Study concerning how to promote distance
                 education through digital technologies.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Ross:2000:MTC,
  author =       "John Minor Ross",
  title =        "Multimedia: from topic to course",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "343--346",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331882",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "After several years of using videodisc systems as a
                 topic in a Current Directions course for seniors, a
                 sophomore-level Multimedia course (D250) was added in
                 the fall of 1995. The course includes hands-on
                 experience with multimedia development and multimedia
                 presentation software. In its first five years
                 (fourteen sections averaging twenty students), D250 has
                 been successful on two fronts. First, it has proven
                 feasible, albeit challenging, to offer this somewhat
                 technology-intensive course on a shoestring budget.
                 Second, in addition to the Information System majors
                 who are required to take D250, a diverse group of
                 non-majors are taking the course as an elective. Guided
                 in part by the advice presented, a similar course could
                 be implemented by other schools.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Doube:2000:DTW,
  author =       "Wendy Doube",
  title =        "Distance teaching workloads",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "347--351",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331883",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "In this paper, we describe a formula for calculating
                 the teaching workload for students who are studying off
                 campus both on and off-line. Initially the faculty of
                 information technology developed a proposal for
                 calculating academic workloads. This proposal reflected
                 the rigid teacher centred learning structures of
                 traditional on-campus delivery and made no allowance
                 for the services required by off-campus students. In
                 response, teachers of off-campus students developed a
                 complementary proposal, based on actual time logs,
                 which reflected their student centred approach to
                 learning. Contrary to popular wisdom, off-campus
                 teaching was found to be more time-consuming than
                 on-campus.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Pike:2000:CCC,
  author =       "Scott M. Pike and Bruce W. Weide and Joseph E.
                 Hollingsworth",
  title =        "{Checkmate}: cornering {C++} dynamic memory errors
                 with checked pointers",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "352--356",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331884",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Pointer errors are stumbling blocks for student and
                 veteran programmers alike. Although languages such as
                 Java use references to protect programmers from pointer
                 pitfalls, the use of garbage collection dictates that
                 languages like C++ will still be used for real-time
                 mission-critical applications. Pointers will stay in
                 the classroom as long as they're used in industry, so
                 as educators, we must find better ways to teach them.
                 This paper presents checked pointers, a simple wrapper
                 for C++ pointers that prevents pointer arithmetic and
                 other common sources of pointer errors, and detects all
                 dereferencing and deallocation errors, including memory
                 leaks. The syntax of checked pointers is highly
                 faithful to raw C++ pointers, but provides run-time
                 error detection and debugging information. After
                 debugging, changing one \#include is all that is
                 required to substitute a non-checking implementation
                 that is as fast as raw C++.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Bishop:2000:OOJ,
  author =       "Judith Bishop and Nigel Bishop",
  title =        "Object-orientation in {Java} for scientific
                 programmers",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "357--361",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331885",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Scientific programmers have traditionally programmed
                 in entirely sequential languages such as Fortran, C or
                 Pascal and it could be argued that object-orientation
                 is not a concept that they would need. Yet computer
                 science departments that give courses to scientists and
                 engineers would like to consider teaching them in Java,
                 rather than in one of the older languages. This paper
                 addresses the dual issues of how Java can best supply
                 everything that the older languages do, and then what
                 it can meaningfully give in added value, especially in
                 the networking and parallel area. Experience with
                 developing solutions in Java to some fifty typical
                 numerical problems has led to a coherent
                 object-oriented approach and a couple of essential
                 support classes for teaching and production work.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Noonan:2000:OOV,
  author =       "Robert E. Noonan",
  title =        "An object-oriented view of backtracking",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "362--366",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331886",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "In this paper we explore Wirth's [11] backtracking
                 algorithm from the perspective of algorithm reuse and
                 separation of concerns. We explore treatment of this
                 problem in object-oriented data structures and
                 algorithms texts. Finally, we present a reusable
                 backtracking (or depth-first search) class.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Woit:2000:ESL,
  author =       "Denise Woit and Dave Mason",
  title =        "Enhancing student learning through on-line quizzes",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "367--371",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331887",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "We have experimented with the use of weekly on-line
                 quizzes to enhance student learning in our first-year
                 computer science courses. In our experiments we
                 compared the effectiveness of using quizzes to the
                 alternative of using weekly marked laboratory
                 assignments. The results of our experiments show that
                 student learning and retention increase with on-line
                 quizzes. Weekly quizzes would be impossible if they
                 were administered and marked in the traditional
                 fashion; thus, we developed and used a secure, online
                 environment for administering, writing, and marking the
                 quizzes, with most of the marking performed
                 automatically via simple marking programs. In this
                 paper we describe our experiment, present our
                 observations about student learning, outline student
                 opinion, relate problems we encountered and our
                 solutions, and provide technical details of our
                 closed-quiz and marking environment.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Chase:2000:CCL,
  author =       "J. D. Chase and Edward G. Okie",
  title =        "Combining cooperative learning and peer instruction in
                 introductory computer science",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "372--376",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331888",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "CPSC 120, Principles of Computer Science I, is a first
                 semester freshmen level course for computer science
                 majors. Over a three semester comparison period, this
                 course had an average WDF rate of 56\% (i.e.,
                 percentage of students receiving a grade of ``D'' or
                 ``F'', or withdrawing from the course). In two sections
                 of this course, two strategies, peer instruction and
                 cooperative learning, were combined to lower the WDF
                 rate for both sections to an average of 32.5\%. The
                 improvement was even more dramatic for the female
                 students in the classes, who improved from a 53\% WDF
                 rate to a WDF rate of only 15\%.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Jarc:2000:ABI,
  author =       "Duane J. Jarc and Michael B. Feldman and Rachelle S.
                 Heller",
  title =        "Assessing the benefits of interactive prediction using
                 {Web}-based algorithm animation courseware",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "377--381",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331889",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "This study used educational software-courseware-that
                 contained algorithm animations and data structure
                 visualizations that were implemented with the
                 programming language Java, and were embedded in a
                 collection of World Wide Web pages. The objective of
                 this study was to determine whether the interactive
                 prediction facility provided by this courseware
                 produced a significant learning advantage. Two
                 experiments were conducted. The results indicated that
                 the students who used the interactive version of the
                 courseware spent significantly more time using it than
                 those who used the noninteractive version. Students who
                 used the interactive version scored better on several
                 of the questions that tested the more difficult
                 lessons, but performed more poorly overall. None of the
                 differences were statistically significant.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Hendrix:2000:DVI,
  author =       "T. Dean Hendrix and James H. {Cross II} and Saeed
                 Maghsoodloo and Matthew L. McKinney",
  title =        "Do visualizations improve program comprehensibility?
                 experiments with control structure diagrams for
                 {Java}",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "382--386",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331890",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Recently, the first in a series of planned
                 comprehension experiments was performed to measure the
                 effect of the control structure diagram (CSD) on
                 program comprehensibility. Upper-division computer
                 science students were asked to respond to questions
                 regarding the structure and execution of a source code
                 module written in Java. Statistical analysis of the
                 data collected from this experiment revealed that the
                 CSD was highly significant in enhancing the subjects'
                 performance in this program comprehension task. The
                 results of this initial experiment along with the
                 planned follow-on experiments promise to shed light on
                 fundamental questions regarding the effect of software
                 visualizations on program comprehensibility.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Brown:2000:EWI,
  author =       "David C. Brown and Isabel F. Cruz and David Finkel and
                 Robert E. Kinicki and Craig E. Wills",
  title =        "Experiences with the {Webware}, interfaces and
                 networking experimental laboratory",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "387--391",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331891",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "This paper describes our experiences with the Webware,
                 Interfaces and Networking Experimental (WINE)
                 Laboratory. The WINE Lab was created to assist in
                 teaching the topics of computer networks, user
                 interfaces and Webware. The goal of the lab is to
                 provide students the opportunity to complete projects,
                 experiment with relevant techniques and make
                 connections between topics with resources not available
                 in a general purpose Unix-based computing environment.
                 The results from offering courses with the lab show
                 success in meeting these goals.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Vat:2000:TSP,
  author =       "Kam Hou Vat",
  title =        "Teaching Software Psychology: expanding the
                 perspective",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "392--396",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331892",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "This paper describes the curriculum development and
                 teaching experience of a junior core course entitled
                 Software Psychology, offered in the undergraduate
                 Software Engineering program at the author's affiliated
                 university. In particular, the pedagogy of
                 problem-based learning is introduced, together with the
                 evolution of the course content. It will also address
                 issues such as resources and facilities needed for the
                 course, and the students' perceived learning as well as
                 the author's lessons learned therein.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Tomer:2000:CCP,
  author =       "D. S. Tomer and Doug Baldwin and Carl H. Smith and
                 Peter B. Hendersen and Venu Vadisigi",
  title =        "{CS1} and {CS2} (panel session): foundations of
                 computer science and discrete mathematics",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "397--398",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331893",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Over a period of thirty years there have been many
                 curriculum reforms in the Undergraduate Computer
                 Science curriculum. The ACM/IEEE-CS task force is
                 currently working on the Curriculum 2001. In this
                 struggle to define and develop this dynamic field of
                 computer science, we have the opportunity to identify
                 the foundations and related concepts of mathematics we
                 would like to see in the new CS curriculum and
                 introduce these in CS1 and CS2. Many standard topics of
                 discrete mathematics can encourage the use of
                 mathematical thinking when taught along with the CS
                 courses. The more complex foundations and other
                 theoretical topics may be introduced later in the
                 curriculum. This session will present some of the views
                 and examples in this direction. Our goal is not to
                 eliminate the need of discrete math but to integrate it
                 into the basics of CS so that the student will
                 experience mathematical reasoning in the early stages
                 of the development of CS topics. Currently discrete
                 math is taught as one of the early math requirements
                 and many students do not see the relationship between
                 the programming concepts and these mathematical
                 concepts. An early blend of these ideas of will provide
                 a richer experience to CS majors and the new topics can
                 be learned more quickly if the underlying theoretical
                 concepts are well understood. The programming languages
                 of choice can be introduced in separate laboratory
                 components taken parallel to CS1 and CS2. We hope that
                 we all can agree that CS is not just programming and we
                 have a new discipline that must develop its basic
                 theory rather than depending on other disciplines to do
                 it for us. Someday, the courses we know now as CS1 and
                 CS2 maybe known as University Computing I and II as we
                 now have in some of the other sciences.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Stevens:2000:ULP,
  author =       "K. Todd Stevens and Joel Henry and Pamela B. Lawhead
                 and John Lewis and Constance Bland and Mary Jane
                 Peters",
  title =        "Using large projects in a computer science curriculum
                 (panel session)",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "399--400",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331894",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{McCracken:2000:ESC,
  author =       "Daniel D. McCracken and Manuel A.
                 P{\'e}rez-Qui{\~n}ones and Robert Bryant and Fred
                 Springsteel and Anne-Louise Radimsky",
  title =        "Experiences in starting computer engineering programs
                 (panel session)",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "401--402",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331895",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Robbert:2000:DCP,
  author =       "Mary Ann Robbert and Ming Wang and Mario Guimaraes and
                 Martha E. Myers",
  title =        "The database course (panel session): what must be
                 taught",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "403--404",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331896",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Fitzgerald:2000:SOA,
  author =       "Sue Fitzgerald and Merry McDonald and Norbert J.
                 Kubilus and Mark Fienup and Dian Lopez",
  title =        "Student outcomes assessment (panel session): what
                 works and what doesn't",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "405--406",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331897",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Panelists will describe their schools' approaches to
                 outcomes assessment for computer science students. Both
                 successful and failed approaches will be discussed.
                 Approaches to assessment start with the identification
                 of program goals and selection of appropriate measures.
                 Measurable results include student performance on
                 standardized and locally developed tests, placement
                 statistics, alumni interviews, employer perceptions,
                 and other skills assessment. Pitfalls will be
                 discussed. Results of outcomes assessment at each
                 institution will be presented, including the management
                 of collected data, interpretation of results, and
                 integration of the results into the curriculum
                 development process.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Hailperin:2000:CFY,
  author =       "Max Hailperin and David Arnow and Judith Bishop and
                 Chester Lund and Lynn Andrea Stein",
  title =        "Concurrency the first year (panel session): experience
                 reports",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "407--408",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331898",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Lidtke:2000:PIS,
  author =       "Doris K. Lidtke and Willis King and John Gorgone and
                 Gayle Yaverbaum",
  title =        "Proposed information systems accreditation criteria
                 (panel session)",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "409--410",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331899",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "This panel will discuss the background leading to the
                 decision to develop a Draft Criteria for accreditation
                 of Information Systems programs, the current status of
                 the Draft Criteria, feedback received from
                 presentations at a number of conferences and on a
                 web-based survey, and a brief description of future
                 plans for the project. Time will be allotted for
                 questions from the audience.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Roberts:2000:CPS,
  author =       "Eric Roberts and C. Fay Cover and Gerald Engel and
                 Carl Chang and James H. {Cross II} and Russ
                 Shackelford",
  title =        "{Curriculum 2001} (panel session): evaluating the
                 {Strawman} report representatives of the {ACM\slash
                 IEEE-CS} task force",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "411--412",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331900",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "In the fall of 1998, the ACM Education Board and the
                 Educational Activities Board of the IEEE Computer
                 Society appointed representatives to a joint task force
                 to prepare Curriculum 2001, the next installment in a
                 series of reports on the undergraduate computer science
                 curriculum that began in 1968 and was then updated in
                 1978 and 1991. Interim reports on the initial planning
                 of the curriculum were presented at the SIGCSE
                 symposium in March 1999 and at the IEEE Frontiers in
                 Education Conference in November 1999. In February
                 2000, the Curriculum 2001 Task Force will release a
                 preliminary version of its report, in the hope of
                 gaining feedback from a wider audience. The purpose of
                 this panel is to give attenders at the SIGCSE
                 conference to review the current state of the
                 preliminary draft and offer their comments to the
                 members of the Curriculum 2001 steering committee on
                 the panel.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Lidtke:2000:WNA,
  author =       "Doris K. Lidtke and Lee Saperstein and Kenneth Martin
                 and Della Bonnette",
  title =        "{What}'s new with {ABET\slash CSAB} integration (panel
                 session)",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "413",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331901",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "The Accreditation Board for Engineering and
                 Technology, Inc. (ABET) and the Computing Sciences
                 Accreditation Board (CSAB) signed a Memorandum of
                 Agreement in November 1998 to integrate CSAB's
                 accreditation services with ABET, with a transition
                 time of approximately two years. During the interim
                 period, the operations of the Computer Science
                 Accreditation Commission (CSAC) are contracted by CSAB
                 to ABET. A committee with CSAC, CSAB, and ABET
                 representation is working to set up the new commission
                 for accrediting programs in the computing sciences.
                 This new commission will probably be called the
                 Computing Accreditation Commission (CAC). Other
                 activities are underway to try to assure that this
                 integration goes as smoothly as possible. The panel
                 members will discuss from various points of view the
                 current status of the integration and plans for the
                 completion of the integration. Kenneth Martin is a Past
                 Chair of CSAC. Lee Saperstein is past Chair of EAC.
                 Della Bonnette is a Past CSAC Chair and current Team
                 Chair. Doris Lidtke is serving as Adjunct Accreditation
                 Director for Computing at ABET and a Past President of
                 CSAB.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Kay:2000:TAS,
  author =       "David G. Kay and Clare Bates Congdon and Sue
                 Fitzgerald and Merle S. King and Pat Semmes",
  title =        "Teaching advice and support for new and adjunct
                 faculty (panel session): experiences, policies, and
                 strategies",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "414--415",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331902",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "The demand for computer science faculty is growing
                 rapidly, along with the demand for seats in computer
                 science courses. The problem of finding, recruiting,
                 and retaining computer science faculty may have reached
                 crisis proportions[1]. Meeting this demand means an
                 influx of new faculty, including perhaps nontraditional
                 faculty such as adjuncts from industry, emeriti,
                 graduate students, or faculty from other disciplines.
                 Such diversity is valuable but brings its own
                 challenges. One of these is acclimating new faculty,
                 particularly those from different academic or
                 industrial environments, to the norms, practices, and
                 expectations of a particular school and department.
                 These may vary considerably among institutions, and
                 some may be subtle and unrecognized, not always
                 identified in existing orientation materials. For the
                 new faculty's experience to be successful (for
                 themselves, for their students, and for the
                 institution), we must identify these issues. But we
                 must also make that information available in an
                 effective form: A comprehensive ``policies and
                 procedures'' manual may be left unread amid the more
                 immediate demands of meeting the first class or
                 starting a research program. Experienced colleagues
                 will have some answers, at least idiosyncratic ones,
                 and likely are willing to share them when they have a
                 free moment; even so, the new instructor may hesitate
                 to call on the same person too often. The panelists
                 will describe their experiences as new or adjunct
                 faculty or as those orienting such faculty; thereafter,
                 we will solicit experiences from the audience. We
                 expect to generate and disseminate a list of teaching
                 issues new faculty must address and a range of
                 strategies for helping those faculty address them. This
                 could serve as a ``Prototype FAQ,'' one that
                 institutions (or their new-faculty coordinators) could
                 adapt to local practices.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Astrachan:2000:RCA,
  author =       "Owen Astrachan and Robert Cartwight and Rich Kick and
                 Cay Horstmann and Fran Trees and Gail Chapman and David
                 Gries and Henry Walkers and Ursula Wolz",
  title =        "Recommendations for changes in advanced placement
                 computer science (panel session)",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "416",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331903",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "In 1981 the APCS Development Committee recommended the
                 use of Pascal in an AP course whose first exam was
                 given in 1984. This decision was controversial; BASIC
                 was in widespread use and serious consideration was
                 given to a language-neutral exam and course. In 1985 an
                 ad-hoc committee made recommendations on changing the
                 exam format, essentially creating two courses that
                 correspond roughly to CS1 and CS2. In 1995 an ad-hoc
                 committee was convened to make recommendations on how
                 best to incorporate C++ into the AP course and exam.
                 The decision to adopt C++, made in 1994, was decidedly
                 controversial. The ad-hoc committee made
                 recommendations on a subset of C++ and on classes
                 similar to those in the standard library, but which
                 were safe for novice programmers to use.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Koffman:2000:IPC,
  author =       "Elliot Koffman and Dorothy Deremer and Chris McDonald
                 and Loren Rhodes and Rebecca Thomas and A. Joe Turner
                 and Curt White",
  title =        "{IT} programs and {CS} departments (panel session)",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "417--418",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331904",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Computer Science departments are experiencing
                 increases in enrollments that rival the expansion in
                 the early '80s. At the same time, many of these
                 students do not seem interested in or equipped to
                 handle the rigor of a traditional computer science
                 program. They are coming into computer science with
                 expectations about computer science education that are
                 significantly different from what they are finding on
                 campus. Instead of courses on data structures and
                 algorithms, automata, and operating systems, they want
                 to learn Visual BASIC, Linux, and obtain Microsoft
                 certification. CS departments responses to these
                 pressures differ widely. Some take the approach that
                 this is a temporary aberration and should have no
                 affect whatsoever on degree programs in computer
                 science. Some provide one-credit courses or seminars to
                 discuss practical aspects of IT not covered in the
                 curriculum. Others have started information technology
                 programs to provide these students with an alternative
                 program. In some cases, outside pressures (i.e., the
                 university administration or external funding) has
                 mandated that CS departments provide such programs.
                 This panel will discuss these issues from varying
                 perspectives. It will also provide some examples of IT
                 programs in CS departments to give us some idea of what
                 is currently being done at other institutions.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Shiflet:2000:UCS,
  author =       "Angela B. Shiflet and Philip Holmes and Chuck
                 Niederriter and Robert M. Panoff and Ernest Sibert",
  title =        "Undergraduate computational science education (panel
                 session)",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "419--420",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331905",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Moses:2000:TWP,
  author =       "Louise Moses and Sally Fincher and James Caristi",
  title =        "Teams work (panel session)",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "421--422",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331906",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "``I didn't think I'd like group work, but I ended up
                 in a good team and it was a great experience. But I
                 feel if you end up in a bad team it can really get you
                 down and will affect your mark.'' This student response
                 (University of Exeter, U.K.) is typical and telling. At
                 least some of the time teams work, and the progression
                 from ``didn't think I'd like'' to ``great experience''
                 happens often enough that those of us who use team work
                 have come to expect it, at least part of the time. The
                 ability to work well in teams is essential for our
                 graduates. It cuts across all the questions --- what,
                 where, why and how we teach. However, not all of our
                 students find working as a member of a team a natural
                 and easy thing to do. Not only that, even though the
                 student quoted in the preceding paragraph uses the
                 phrase ``good team'' and the phrase ``bad team'' these
                 and many other terms are not well defined. The Computer
                 Science (CS) academic community regards group project
                 work as an essential component of any degree; the
                 discipline's professional societies world-wide
                 emphasize project and group work as preparation for
                 professional practice. Project work is recognized as
                 having many educational and social benefits, in
                 particular providing students with opportunities for
                 active learning. Nevertheless, managing project work is
                 problematic, because CS projects are:expensive,
                 demanding considerable supervision as well as technical
                 resources; complex, marrying design, human
                 communication, human-computer interaction, and
                 technology to satisfy objectives ranging from
                 consolidation of technical skills through provoking
                 insight into organizational practice, teamwork and
                 professional issues, to inculcating academic discipline
                 and presentation skills; continually demanding, set in
                 the context of a rapidly changing technology which
                 affects technical objectives and demands ever-evolving
                 skills in both students and supervisors. In a young and
                 changing discipline, some aspect of project work is
                 questioned in almost every institution. The three
                 panelists bring experience from four educational
                 institutions in two countries. Louise Moses is Chair of
                 the Department of Computer Science and Information
                 Systems at Mount Union College. She has supervised team
                 projects in extra-departmental service courses, classes
                 provided for departmental majors, and
                 inter-disciplinary courses. During the summer term of
                 the previous three academic years she has been Honorary
                 Visiting Researcher in the Department of Computer
                 Science in the School of Engineering at The University
                 of Exeter, Exeter, U.K. In that position she has worked
                 as part of the management team for first year students
                 in the first year project. James Caristi is a professor
                 of mathematics and computer science at Valparaiso
                 University. He was the 1990 recipient of the Sears
                 Roebuck Award for Teaching Excellence and Campus
                 Leadership, and is the 1999 recipient of the
                 Distinguished Teaching Award from the Indiana Section
                 of the Mathematical Association of America. He has been
                 using teams in different ways in computer science
                 classes at all levels for over 15 years. Sally Fincher
                 is a Lecturer in the Computing Laboratory at the
                 University of Kent at Canterbury in England. She has
                 been project manager for the Effective Projectwork in
                 Computer Science (EPCoS) project. EPCoS was a
                 10-partner, three-year funded project which worked to
                 identify best practices in CS projectwork, transfer
                 those practices between institutions and examine and
                 analyze the process of transfer. We have wrestled with
                 project design and how to make team assignments. And,
                 even though providing good teamwork experiences is more
                 of an art than a science --- with no hard and fast
                 rules --- there are guidelines; it will be profitable
                 to share our knowledge and our experiences. We shall
                 consider six major areas concerning team and group
                 work, and the kind of issues that are associated with
                 them. Allocation How do we allocate students to groups?
                 And then groups to supervisors?Supervision What sort of
                 role should a supervisor take with respect to their
                 group? Friend, mentor, project manager or technical
                 guru? Does it make a difference? Assessment How do we
                 assess the contribution of an individual when the
                 deliverables are a team effort ? Should we even try to?
                 Motivation What happens when students get into a
                 ``bad'' team? How do we keep them motivated? Reflection
                 Especially when introducing teamwork into the
                 curriculum, reflection is an essential part of the
                 learning cycle. How do we plan to make sure we include
                 time and opportunity for this? Teamwork How do we
                 encourage working together, when in some other academic
                 circumstances this might be called ``cheating''?",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{McCauley:2000:ASE,
  author =       "Rene{\'e}e McCauley and Nell Dale and Thomas Hilburn
                 and Susan Mengel and Branson W. Murrill",
  title =        "The assimilation of software engineering into the
                 undergraduate computer science curriculum (panel
                 session)",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "423--424",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331907",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Kay:2000:IPL,
  author =       "David G. Kay",
  title =        "Intellectual property law basics for computer science
                 instructors (seminar session)",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "425",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331908",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Increasingly the practice of computing involves legal
                 issues. Patenting algorithms, domain name poaching, and
                 ``re-using'' HTML and graphics from web sites all raise
                 questions in the domain of intellectual property law
                 (which includes patents, copyrights, trade secrets, and
                 trademarks). In the classroom, computer science
                 educators often confront questions that have legal
                 ramifications. To many computer scientists, the legal
                 system seems arbitrary and impenetrable, just as
                 software development is obscure to many lawyers. But
                 each discipline has its own axioms and goals, its own
                 culture and approach to solving problems. Moreover,
                 each discipline has been largely successful in meeting
                 its goals, despite such problems as frivolous, costly
                 lawsuits on one side and unstable, bloated software on
                 the other. The goal of this seminar is to give computer
                 science faculty a framework for answering students'
                 questions and debunking the most egregious
                 misconceptions about intellectual property issues.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Lee:2000:FFD,
  author =       "John A. N. Lee and Kevin Bowyer",
  title =        "Future faculty development seminar in ethics, social
                 impact and alternative teaching strategies (seminar
                 session)",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "426",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331909",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "This seminar/workshop on ethics and the social impact
                 in computer science, supported by studies of the
                 applicability of alternative teaching and learning
                 strategies, is targeted towards doctoral candidates in
                 computer science whose life-goal is to teach in a
                 university or college setting. Based on the concept of
                 ``ethics across the curriculum'' the seminar/workshop
                 will prepare future faculty to incorporate ethical and
                 social impact concerns in their technical courses. At
                 the same time they will be exposed to modern teaching
                 and learning techniques that will assist them in making
                 a good start in their teaching careers.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Brady:2000:IMB,
  author =       "Alyce Brady and Michael J. Clancy and Kathleen
                 Larson",
  title =        "Introduction to the marine biology case study (seminar
                 session)",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "427",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331910",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "A new case study for the AP curriculum, based on a
                 marine biology simulation program will be released for
                 the 2000-2001 academic year. The case study highlights
                 linear and two-dimensional data structures, object
                 interaction, object-oriented design, and discrete
                 simulation. This seminar will introduce the new case
                 study to AP teachers and other interested CS educators,
                 and will discuss how it can be integrated into the AP
                 (or CS 1 and CS 2) curricula.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Martin:2000:NSF,
  author =       "C. Dianne Martin and Margaret Reek",
  title =        "The {National Science Foundation} (seminar session):
                 funding opportunities for {CS} faculty through the
                 {CCLI} program",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "428",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331911",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "A new program in undergraduate education at the
                 National Science Foundation is the Course, Curriculum
                 and Laboratory Improvement (CCLI) program. CCLI has two
                 tracks that are of particular interest to CS faculty
                 members. They are the Educational Materials Development
                 (EMD) and the Adaptation and Implementation (A{\&}I)
                 tracks. The focus of the EMD track is to develop, test
                 and implement new materials or practices for national
                 dissemination. The focus of the A{\&}I track is to
                 adapt and implement existing innovative materials or
                 practices within a particular institution. Both of
                 these tracks offer opportunities for funding for CS
                 faculty concerned about improving the quality of CS
                 undergraduate education. Projects can encompass a broad
                 range of activities, from individual courses and
                 laboratories through comprehensive projects that impact
                 entire curricula or programs across multiple
                 departments or institutions. Funding can be requested
                 for all items normally supported by NSF, such as
                 equipment and personnel. The next CCLI program deadline
                 date is June 7, 2000, making the seminar very timely
                 for people interested in developing a proposal.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Kolling:2000:OFJ,
  author =       "Michael K{\"o}lling and John Rosenberg",
  title =        "Objects first with {Java} and {BlueJ} (seminar
                 session)",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "429",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/331795.331912",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 19 10:05:03 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Object-oriented languages have been taught for some
                 time at universities. The most common approach has been
                 to teach those constructs required for imperative
                 programming first and to introduce the notion of
                 classes and objects somewhat later in the course. More
                 recently, many educators have been promoting the notion
                 of teaching about classes and objects first. This helps
                 students to adopt the object-oriented paradigm at an
                 early stage and encourages them to focus on the
                 application structure before beginning coding. Most new
                 textbooks have followed such an approach. While this
                 method has clear advantages, it is not easy to realise
                 in practice. This is partly a result of the languages
                 used for teaching. However, we would argue that the
                 major difficulty comes from the lack of program
                 development environments and tools which themselves
                 fully embrace the object-oriented paradigm. The use of
                 Java as the language for teaching addresses some of the
                 problems. Java with its clean support for the
                 object-oriented paradigm is now widely regarded as a
                 suitable choice for introductory teaching. The choice
                 of environment, however, remains an issue. The view of
                 the development environment as a major difficulty in
                 Java courses is further supported by numerous reports
                 of educators relating their experiences with teaching
                 introductory Java courses. While Java was consistently
                 described as an excellent language for teaching the
                 object-oriented paradigm, the environments available
                 are regularly identified as a significant source of
                 problems. These may be divided into two areas: The
                 environments are designed for professional programmers.
                 They are too complex and have a steep learning curve.
                 Thus valuable teaching time is spent teaching the
                 students how to use the environment and this detracts
                 from the principles of programming. Most of the
                 existing environments fail to fully adopt the
                 object-oriented paradigm. Users of the environment must
                 deal with files, lines of code and directory
                 hierarchies rather than classes, objects and
                 relationships. In this seminar we will argue the case
                 that the requirements for teaching the object-oriented
                 paradigm and Java can only be satisfied by the
                 provision of a program development environment
                 specifically designed for teaching. We will introduce
                 BlueJ, a relatively new development environment which
                 addresses all of these issues. We will show how the
                 unique features of this environment can be used to
                 create an introductory Java course that fully embraces
                 the ``object first'' approach and supports the
                 presentation of a cleaner picture of the paradigm than
                 previously possible. BlueJ is based heavily on earlier
                 work by us on a language and environment called Blue.
                 BlueJ is a complete Java development environment,
                 written entirely in Java. It provides graphical support
                 for object-oriented design, abstracts over files and
                 the operating system and provides fully integrated
                 support for a design, edit, compile and test cycle. In
                 addition, BlueJ supports interactive creation of
                 objects and interactive calling of methods of objects.
                 This provides support for incremental development, one
                 of the major advantages of object-orientation. It
                 includes an easy-to-use debugger and support for
                 applications and applets. One of the main differences
                 between BlueJ and other environments is its distinct
                 focus on a teaching context. It combines powerful tools
                 with an easy-to-use interface, avoiding the complexity
                 that creates so many problems when using existing
                 environments in a classroom. BlueJ has been used very
                 successfully for two semesters as Monash University.
                 The presentation will provide the context in which the
                 BlueJ project has been developed. We will discuss the
                 design principles for BlueJ, the major aims of the
                 project and our experiences with using it in class. A
                 demonstration of the current version of BlueJ will be
                 given. We will also demonstrate a set of examples and
                 problems which can be used in a first Java course and
                 show how the course structure can be improved and
                 support teaching ``objects first'' with the
                 availability of an environment that fully supports the
                 paradigm. BlueJ is available free of charge and can be
                 used by any interested institution. Details of how to
                 obtain a copy of BlueJ will be provided at the
                 seminar.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Ben-Ari:2000:HGG,
  author =       "Mordechai Ben-Ari",
  title =        "How to Get a Good Review",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "4--6",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/355354.571920",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:42 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "For several years I have been reviewing submissions
                 for SIGCSE conferences and, unfortunately, recommending
                 rejection of the majority of the submissions. While
                 some undoubtedly deserved the recommendation, others
                 described work that is potentially interesting and
                 relevant, but the papers were so poorly written that it
                 was impossible to judge the ideas fairly. I am writing
                 this message to help SIGCSE members write better papers
                 and improve their chances of acceptance. A review is
                 like an audition: you have prepared your presentation
                 for weeks or months, yet you only have a few minutes to
                 convince a director (who knows nothing about you) that
                 you are better than those appearing before or after
                 you. The key words here are that the reviewer knows
                 nothing about you. You may have been working on a
                 project for months, but you only have four pages in
                 which to ``perform.'' You have two tasks when you write
                 a paper. First, you must structure your paper so that
                 your ideas and work are clearly and fully described
                 within the page limit. Second, and more importantly,
                 you must place your work in context so that the
                 reviewer can decide if it is significant and
                 relevant.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Martin:2000:DPB,
  author =       "C. Dianne Martin",
  title =        "Debunking the {Puppy Baron} culture",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "7--7",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/355354.355355",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:42 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Gotterbarn:2000:ELS,
  author =       "Don Gotterbarn",
  title =        "The education and licensing of software professionals:
                 the myth of ``a perfected science'' considered
                 harmful",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "8--9",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/355354.355356",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:42 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Lee:2000:EHM,
  author =       "John A. N. Lee",
  title =        "Emulators of ``historic machines''",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "10--11",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/355354.355357",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:42 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Clear:2000:PED,
  author =       "Tony Clear",
  title =        "Practitioner education --- degrees of difference?",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "11--12",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/355354.355358",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:42 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Gorgone:2000:NGC,
  author =       "John T. Gorgone",
  title =        "A new {IS} graduate curriculum model --- after
                 eighteen years",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "13--14",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/355354.355359",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:42 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Dale:2000:RPR,
  author =       "Nell Dale",
  title =        "Reflections on past research: part {II}",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "14--16",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/355354.355360",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:42 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{McCauley:2000:FSS,
  author =       "Ren{\'e}e McCauley",
  title =        "``Free source'' software --- what a blessing!",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "16--17",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/355354.355361",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:42 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Knox:2000:SEN,
  author =       "Deborah L. Knox",
  title =        "{SIGCSE} endorses a new journal on educational
                 resources in computing",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "17--18",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/355354.355362",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:42 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Walker:2000:NG,
  author =       "Henry M. Walker",
  title =        "Notes on grading",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "18--19",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/355354.355363",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:42 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Gersting:2000:EEIa,
  author =       "Judith L. Gersting and Frank H. Young",
  title =        "Experiences with ethical issues",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "20--21",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/355354.355364",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:42 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Makinen:2000:RUD,
  author =       "Erkki M{\"a}kinen and Markku Siermala",
  title =        "Restricted universe data structures",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "22--24",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/355354.355365",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:42 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Restricted universe data structures and their
                 algorithms augment our knowledge of the behavior of
                 standard data structures. Understanding the increase in
                 asymptotic efficiency when restricting the universe of
                 possible keys helps us to realize the limits of the
                 common data structures, such as balanced binary trees.
                 This paper first introduces the principles of
                 restricted universe data structures and then
                 empirically compares stratified trees and AVL trees in
                 the connection with a simple algorithmic problem.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{McCauley:2000:IRC,
  author =       "Ren{\'e}e McCauley and Bill Manaris",
  title =        "An information resource for computer science
                 educators",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "25--29",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/355354.355366",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:42 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "This paper describes an information resource for
                 educators in departments offering computer science
                 degree programs. This resource is designed to provide
                 structured, up-to-date information in terms of
                 demographics and statistics related to curricula,
                 faculty, and students in such departments.
                 Additionally, it facilitates the identification of
                 various trends based on these data over several years.
                 This paper presents highlights of the information
                 generated through this project.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Arif:2000:MTO,
  author =       "Essam M. Arif",
  title =        "A methodology for teaching object-oriented programming
                 concepts in an advanced programming course",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "30--34",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/355354.355367",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:42 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "I have been teaching an advanced programming course
                 for undergraduate students for four years. My intention
                 is that object-oriented programming principles and
                 concepts could be easily simplified and taught to the
                 students in this course. In this paper we will
                 discusses a step by step methodology that I use in this
                 course to teach my students how to understand and apply
                 these concepts. The paper also attempts to determine
                 the attribute of students to OOP and their reaction
                 towards the methodology. It reports the result of a
                 survey conducted to students after taking two
                 introductory computer programming courses using a
                 structural programming language.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Gelderblom:2000:OCS,
  author =       "J. Helene Gelderblom",
  title =        "{OOPtutor}: a {CBL} system for introductory
                 object-oriented programming",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "35--38",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/355354.355368",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:42 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "The author developed OOPtutor, a prototype of a system
                 that teaches entry level object-oriented programming in
                 Java. It uses a simple world of dogs to introduce the
                 important object-oriented concepts like objects,
                 classes, methods and inheritance. The prototype was
                 implemented as a set of object-oriented classes that
                 perform general CBL authoring functions. This article
                 gives a brief description of the OOPtutor prototype and
                 its implementation.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Goold:2000:FAP,
  author =       "Annagret Goold and Russell Rimmer",
  title =        "Factors affecting performance in first-year
                 computing",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "39--43",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/355354.355369",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:42 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Performances are analysed over successive semesters
                 for a cohort of first-year students doing computer
                 programming. Attainment is related to performance in
                 other studies. However, many factors have roles.
                 Learning style and problem-solving skills are important
                 in information technology in Semester I. Gender and
                 secondary school outcomes matter in introductory
                 programming, also in Semester I. Dislike of programming
                 influences outcomes in introductory programming and in
                 Data Structures and Algorithms in Semester II. For a
                 number of indicators, influence fluctuates over time
                 and across area of study.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Bhatti:2000:VTT,
  author =       "M. Afzal Bhatti",
  title =        "Visual tool for teaching synchronization problems in
                 operating systems",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "44--45",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/355354.355371",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:42 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "During the last several years, many attempts were made
                 to prove that information technology (IT) holds great
                 promise for education. For that purpose all over world,
                 research has been carried out on the instructional use
                 of IT in education. The results of the research
                 activity have repeatedly proven that computers can be
                 powerful educational tools. Information technology,
                 when properly used, can improve learning, motivate
                 students, and help them gain higher-level cognitive
                 skills critical to lifelong learning. Yet, despite the
                 proven success of instructional computing, it has not
                 yet been fully adopted in meaningful way into computer
                 science education at university level. The paper is
                 about an attempt to use information technology to teach
                 basic concepts in one of the core computer science
                 courses---operating systems---in a modest computing
                 environment.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Jovanovic-Dolecek:2000:CES,
  author =       "Gordana Jovanovic-Dolecek and Victor H. Champac",
  title =        "{CGTDEMO} --- educational software for the central
                 limit theorem",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "46--48",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/355354.355372",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:42 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "This paper describes the demo package for teaching and
                 visualizing the Central limit theorem. The topic
                 treated in this paper is of significant interest in
                 undergraduate coverage of non-deterministic systems.
                 Two types of random variables are considered:
                 symmetric, highly concentrated about its mean value and
                 nonsymmetrical random variables. The demo program is
                 developed in MATLAB 5.2. The program gives the user
                 step by step guidance. The user chooses the type of
                 variable, the length of the sum N, and the
                 corresponding parameters of a random variable.
                 Successive plots of the sums of random variables and
                 the estimations of the corresponding probability
                 density functions are obtained. Finally the comparison
                 with a normal variable is given.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Rosso:2000:OMT,
  author =       "Ana Rosso and Marcela Daniele",
  title =        "Our method to teach algorithmic development",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "49--52",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/355354.355373",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:42 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "In this paper we outline a method of teaching
                 algorithmic, based on problem-solving and stating the
                 necessary stages to be considered when writing an
                 algorithm which solves a given problem.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Gaona:2000:RDC,
  author =       "Amparo L{\'o}pez Gaona",
  title =        "The relevance of design in {CS1}",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "53--55",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/355354.355374",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:42 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Most of the papers on the experiences in teaching the
                 first object-oriented programming course are biased
                 towards the selection of the best programming language.
                 Sometimes we argue the pros and cons of particular
                 languages (C, C++, Java). My point is that teaching a
                 programming methodology is the most important element
                 for such a course.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Jacobsen:2000:EDL,
  author =       "Michele Jacobsen and Rob Kremer and Mildred L. G.
                 Shaw",
  title =        "Experiments with distance learning in software
                 engineering graduate courses",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "56--59",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/355354.355375",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:42 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "This article reports on our experience to date with
                 these two distance graduate courses in software
                 engineering. We experimented with several technological
                 tools to facilitate computer mediated communication:
                 WebCT, electronic mail, a list server, and NetMeeting.
                 We briefly discuss the methods used to evaluate the
                 distance learning environments experienced by the
                 graduate students, and make recommendations for future
                 research and educational practice in distance learning
                 environments.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Pullen:2000:TCM,
  author =       "J. Mark Pullen and Eugene Norris and Mark Fix",
  title =        "Teaching {C++} in a multi-user virtual environment",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "60--64",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/355354.355376",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:42 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "The Internet has opened tremendous possibilities for
                 distance education, where teachers and students can be
                 distributed worldwide. However, much of today's
                 Internet-based teaching is limited to student access of
                 Web-based multimedia documents. In this paper we
                 describe new dimensions in distributed education that
                 are possible in synchronous sessions where the students
                 interact with the teacher in real time. We review and
                 elaborate on the nature of the MUVE, a spatially
                 oriented, network-accessed software environment that
                 uses persistent object technology to promote student
                 creativity and allow continuity between online
                 sessions. We describe our experiences in using a MUVE
                 to enable distributed education at the college level in
                 graduate and undergraduate courses, and its use with
                 high school students in the DARPA Computer-Assisted
                 Education and Training Initiative (CAETI).",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Bravo:2000:DSC,
  author =       "C. Bravo and M. A. Redondo and M. Ortega and J.
                 Bravo",
  title =        "{DOMOSIMCOL}: a simulation collaborative environment
                 for the learning of domotic design",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "65--67",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/355354.355377",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:42 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  URL =          "ftp://ftp.math.utah.edu/pub/mirrors/ftp.ira.uka.de/bibliography/Misc/Contrib.bib",
  abstract =     "The learning systems based on the solution of real
                 projects have proved to be efficient in the different
                 educational levels. With the use of simulation
                 environments these systems achieve a combination
                 between the student monitoring and discovery learning.
                 In this work we present tools that enable the creation
                 of a plan in a collaborative way and the use of
                 simulation in learning communities to the solution of
                 design problems applied to the domotics domain",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Elkateeb:2000:WBM,
  author =       "Ali Elkateeb and Ala Awad",
  title =        "A {WWW}-based multimedia center for learning data
                 communications --- phase 1",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "68--73",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/355354.355378",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:42 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "The use of multimedia in education has become an
                 important element to improve the quality of education
                 and to reduce the cost of the educational system. In
                 addition, the students got the benefit of learning and
                 understanding the material better than in the
                 conventional way. In this work, a learning package
                 called ``Data Communications Learning Center'' (DCLC)
                 has been developed and tested. The main objective of
                 this center is to help university students and others
                 to learn data communication concepts, architectures and
                 operations. The center is a world wide web (www) based,
                 and it allows any student that uses a standard modem
                 for the Internet access to use our center. The center
                 has been developed to be easy to use. The initial
                 evaluation of the center examined by a few students
                 have complemented that the center has improved their
                 understanding to some data communication concepts which
                 the center already supports. Although our intention is
                 to support one topic at the first stage of this
                 project, one can easily add other topics to the center.
                 Any professor who is willing to put his course in the
                 center can achieve this without any prior knowledge
                 about the internal design of the center.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Schaub:2000:TJG,
  author =       "Stephen Schaub",
  title =        "Teaching {Java} with Graphics in {CS1}",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "71--73",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/355354.571919",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:42 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "This paper discusses an approach to teaching basic
                 object-oriented concepts in CS1 using Java graphics.
                 Students first use a simplified turtle graphics API to
                 explore introductory programming issues. Later, they
                 see a real-world example of how inheritance can be used
                 to add functionality to the standard Java Abstracting
                 Windowing Toolkit, to facilitate the construction of
                 sophisticated graphics applications.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{McGuffee:2000:DCS,
  author =       "James W. McGuffee",
  title =        "Defining computer science",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "74--76",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/355354.355379",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:42 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "This paper explores the use and purpose of a
                 definition of computer science from the perspective of
                 an undergraduate student. In order to gain access to
                 the topic, the nature and purpose of definitions are
                 explored. Historical examples of computer science
                 definitions are given. The paper concludes with an
                 examination of how students define computer science and
                 how we should use these definitions in computer science
                 education.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Lorenzen:2000:PYE,
  author =       "Torben Lorenzen",
  title =        "Publish your {Excel} grade book on the {Web}",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "77--78",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/355354.355380",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:42 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "I have created an Excel spreadsheet to use as my
                 course grade book. I will begin with an overview of
                 such a sample grade book that I use in a course,
                 teaching students about Microsoft Office. I will then
                 tell you how I use the grade book, the equations that
                 make it work, how to download it from the web, and
                 finally how to modify it.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Soklic:2000:ICP,
  author =       "Milan E. Soklic",
  title =        "Impact of computing platforms on the performance of
                 the asymmetric traveling salesman problem",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "79--81",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/355354.355381",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:42 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "This article discusses a serial and a parallel version
                 of a heuristic algorithm for a solution to the
                 traveling salesman problem, implementation of these
                 algorithms, and their performance in terms of finding
                 the most favorable solution, and an average solution.
                 The algorithms implemented in C sequential programming
                 language, and in Occam concurrent programming language
                 were run on different computing platforms to study
                 their impact on the comparative value of the solutions
                 each platform provided. The programs were tested on
                 reference data from TSPLIB data files, a collection of
                 sample instances of traveling salesman problem.
                 Experimental results, using asymmetric cost matrix,
                 indicate good performance compared to the optimal
                 solutions provided in the TSPLIB reference library.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Li:2000:MNT,
  author =       "Ming-Sun Li and Marcus Wright",
  title =        "On a modified nine-tails problem",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "82--82",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/355354.355382",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:42 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Roberts:2000:CEI,
  author =       "Eric Roberts",
  title =        "Computing education and the information technology
                 workforce",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "83--90",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/355354.355383",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:42 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Shi:2000:MAS,
  author =       "Hongchi Shi and Yi Shang and Su-Shing Chen",
  title =        "A multi-agent system for computer science education",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "1--4",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343051",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "In this paper, we present a multi-agent system for
                 supporting student-centered, self-paced, and highly
                 interactive learning in undergraduate computer science
                 education. The system is based on a hybrid
                 problem-based and case-based learning model, for both
                 creative problem solving and mechanical experience
                 simulation. It aims at enhancing the effectiveness of
                 the undergraduate learning experience in computer
                 science. Implemented using the prevalent Internet, Web,
                 and digital library technologies, the system adopts an
                 open architecture design and targets at large-scale,
                 distributed operations. In the initial implementation
                 of the system, a number of prototypes using different
                 Java-based software environments have been developed.
                 They offer tradeoffs in system performance and design
                 complexity.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Culwin:2000:LWB,
  author =       "Fintan Culwin",
  title =        "{Lecturelets}: {web} based {Java} enabled lectures",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "5--8",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343053",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "The traditional lecture has, for a long time, been
                 subject to significant criticisms regarding its
                 learning effectiveness. Despite this it remains popular
                 and several attempts have been made to transport
                 aspects of its format to the Web. Many of these
                 projects appear to have been ill informed and, like
                 many pedagogic uses of the Web, under evaluated. This
                 paper describes the design, implementation and
                 deployment of lecturelets, small low-cost Web hosted
                 lecture like presentations. One design intention was to
                 include effective support for their evaluation and the
                 mechanisms and intentions for this are described.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Kumar:2000:DGP,
  author =       "Amruth Kumar",
  title =        "Dynamically generating problems on static scope",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "9--12",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343055",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Solving problems is an integral part of learning in
                 Computer Science. In order to provide students with a
                 vast supply of problems with which to practice, we
                 propose to use applets that automatically generate
                 problems. In this paper, we first discuss the
                 capabilities required of such applets, and then,
                 present the design and features of an applet we have
                 developed to automatically generate problems on static
                 scope in Pascal.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Nelson:2000:TCN,
  author =       "Daniel Nelson and Yau Man Ng",
  title =        "Teaching computer networking using open source
                 software",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "13--16",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343056",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "For the past seven years we have taught a subject
                 entitled Network Software and Management (NSM) for both
                 computer science and electrical engineering students.
                 We discuss the evolution of this subject syllabus in
                 response to the changing requirements of the workplace
                 environment, ever improving technology and the need to
                 combine theory and practice in teaching subjects such
                 as this. We used open source software exclusively in
                 our laboratory exercises and we provide the rationale
                 behind our choice of specific software packages.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Bernat:2000:SSR,
  author =       "Andrew Bernat and Patricia J. Teller and Ann Gates and
                 Nellie Delgado",
  title =        "Structuring the student research experience",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "17--20",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343059",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "The benefits of working in a research group are clear:
                 students develop domain expertise, gain an
                 understanding and appreciation of the research process
                 and its practice, and acquire team, communication,
                 problem-solving, and higher-level thinking skills.
                 Students with this experience are better equipped to
                 make informed judgments about technical matters and to
                 communicate and work in teams to solve complex
                 problems. However, it is difficult to provide a quality
                 experience to large numbers of students, particularly
                 to students of differing abilities. The Systems and
                 Software Engineering Affinity Research Group model
                 provides a socialization mechanism and infrastructure
                 that supports the development and management of large
                 research groups that engage undergraduate and graduate
                 students, who have a wide range of skill levels and
                 experiences, in research and projects. This
                 non-hierarchical model integrates students into both
                 small research groups and an encompassing large
                 research group, and uses structured activities to
                 develop their research, technical, communication, and
                 group skills. In this paper we introduce the model and
                 report how the model meets independently developed Best
                 Practice guidelines for student research experiences
                 and we provide indicators of success for use by other
                 projects.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Kolikant:2000:AS,
  author =       "Yifat Ben-David Kolikant and Mordechai Ben-Ari and
                 Sarah Pollack",
  title =        "The anthropology semaphores",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "21--24",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343061",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "This paper describes research into the conceptions of
                 students studying concurrency, using qualitative
                 methods that originated in anthropological field work.
                 We were able to obtain a deep understanding of
                 students' mental models of semaphores: they construct
                 consistent, though non-viable, models of semaphores,
                 and they use them in patterns without understanding the
                 synchronization context. We used the results to improve
                 our teaching of concurrency, for example, by carefully
                 defining the semaphore model and exercising the model
                 outside of a problem-solving context.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Hagan:2000:DIH,
  author =       "Dianne Hagan and Selby Markham",
  title =        "Does it help to have some programming experience
                 before beginning a computing degree program?",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "25--28",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343063",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "There is an intuitive perception that students with
                 prior programming experience have an initial advantage
                 in an introductory programming course, but that this
                 advantage may decrease over the duration of the course
                 if the style of programming is different from what the
                 student has learnt previously. This paper reports on a
                 study that indicates that students who have experience
                 in at least one programming language at the beginning
                 of an introductory programming course perform
                 significantly better in the assessment than those with
                 none, and that the more languages with which a student
                 has experience, the better the performance tends to
                 be.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Tjaden:2000:WWB,
  author =       "Bunny J. Tjaden and Brett C. Tjaden",
  title =        "A worldwide, {Web}-based study of the attitudes of
                 college freshmen toward computing",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "29--32",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343064",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "We propose to initiate a worldwide survey of colleges
                 and universities to re-evaluate attitudes of students
                 toward computing courses. In 1985, a study of college
                 freshmen was conducted to determine their attitudes
                 toward introductory computer science courses [10]. At
                 that time, access to and experience with computers was
                 not the norm for the typical student about to enter the
                 university. The 1985 study found that females, as well
                 as students with no computer experience, reported the
                 most negative encounters with computing. We intend to
                 expand the original study, delving into whether or not
                 the programming language learned, compiler and
                 operating system used, peer and parental attitudes, as
                 well as other factors, influence a student's attitude
                 toward computing. We are particularly interested in
                 examining these attitudes from the standpoint of women
                 and minorities, those who are still least likely to
                 have prior, in-depth computer experience. Additionally,
                 with the ease of communication due to email and the
                 internet, we believe it is of interest to computing
                 educators worldwide to participate in such a study. We
                 will provide a survey instrument, a set of World Wide
                 Web tools, and a database. Faculty and their classes
                 from around the world will be encouraged to
                 participate. Each institution will be able to
                 immediately compare the profile of their students with
                 those of other schools. We will provide search
                 capabilities on several key fields in order to
                 facilitate participant data analysis. We foresee the
                 results of our survey generating a dialogue among
                 educators and possibly changing the direction of and/or
                 way in which computer science is taught.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Exton:2000:ETA,
  author =       "Chris Exton",
  title =        "{Elucidate}: a tool to aid comprehension of concurrent
                 object oriented execution",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "33--36",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343066",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "The adoption of concurrent programming techniques into
                 mainstream system development has brought with it a
                 problem in software comprehension. Stepping through the
                 code is no longer adequate to ensure a student's
                 understanding of how a concurrent program will execute.
                 Elucidate attempts to rectify this inadequacy by giving
                 the student the ability to dynamically explore the
                 various threads of execution and event order of an
                 executing concurrent program. The student can gain an
                 understanding of the threads of control and how they
                 relate to classes, object instantiation, destruction
                 and method invocation. Elucidate adds a layer of
                 abstraction that is capable of clearly exhibiting to
                 the student many of the underlying problems associated
                 with concurrent programming.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Rossling:2000:AAA,
  author =       "Guido R{\"o}{\ss}ling and Markus Sch{\"u}er and Bernd
                 Freisleben",
  title =        "The {ANIMAL} algorithm animation tool",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "37--40",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343069",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "In this paper, we present Animal, a new tool for
                 developing animations to be used in lectures. Animal
                 offers a small but powerful set of graphical operators.
                 Animations are generated using a visual editor, by
                 scripting or via API calls. All animations can be
                 edited visually. Animal supports source and pseudo code
                 inclusion and highlighting as well as precise
                 user-defined delays between actions. The paper
                 evaluates the functionality of Animal in comparison to
                 other animation tools.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Dann:2000:MCP,
  author =       "Wanda Dann and Stephen Cooper and Randy Pausch",
  title =        "Making the connection: programming with animated small
                 world",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "41--44",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343070",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "In learning to program, students must gain an
                 understanding of how their program works. They need to
                 make a connection between what they have written and
                 what the program actually does. Otherwise, students
                 have trouble figuring out what went wrong when things
                 do not work. One factor that contributes to making this
                 connection is an ability to visualize a program's state
                 and how it changes when the program is executed. In
                 this paper, we present Alice, a 3-D interactive
                 animation environment. Alice provides a graphic
                 visualization of a program's state in an animated small
                 world and thereby supports the beginning programmer in
                 learning to construct and debug programs.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Raner:2000:TOO,
  author =       "Mirko Raner",
  title =        "Teaching object-orientation with the {Object
                 Visualization and Annotation Language (OVAL)}",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "45--48",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343071",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Object-oriented techniques and technologies are
                 omnipresent in all branches of modern software
                 development and systems design. Still today there is an
                 enormous demand for training in the area of
                 object-oriented analysis, design and programming.
                 Several languages and notations have been developed for
                 the visual presentation of object-oriented ideas and
                 designs (eg, the Booch method [1], OMT [3] or the
                 emerging standard UML [4]). Such languages or notations
                 are an excellent means of communication and
                 documentation amongst experts. However, for novice
                 trainings they are not very suitable. Instead, they
                 raise additional difficulties: not only a large number
                 of new ideas and a new way of thinking has to be
                 learned, but also a highly non-intuitive graphic
                 notation to present these ideas. The newly developed
                 Object Visualization and Annotation Language (OVAL) is
                 a simple illustrative notation which aims at OO
                 novices. It visualizes the key ideas of
                 object-orientation in a very intuitive way and was
                 especially designed to assist in the process of
                 teaching the way of object-oriented thinking.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Dick:2000:TTS,
  author =       "Martin Dick and Margot Postema and Jan Miller",
  title =        "Teaching tools for software engineering education",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "49--52",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343072",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "This paper examines a set of teaching tools in the
                 Software Engineering Practice course at Monash
                 University. Analyzing various aspects of the course and
                 student survey response to their value provides
                 evaluation of the overall success of the tools. The
                 paper demonstrates that a successful teaching program
                 needs to combine a range of teaching tools to achieve
                 its aims.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Hilburn:2000:TNP,
  author =       "Thomas B. Hilburn",
  title =        "Teams need a process!",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "53--56",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343074",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "This paper begins with a discussion of the importance
                 of software development and the problems encountered by
                 those trying to work effectively on software project
                 teams. It is argued that for students to be effective
                 in working on teams they need the discipline and
                 organization offered by a rigorous team software
                 process. The author describes his experiences in using
                 the Team Software Process (TSP) to teach an
                 introductory course in software engineering. The
                 structure and key elements of the process are
                 presented, along with techniques used in selecting and
                 forming teams. The paper examines the TSP quality
                 assurance features and finishes with a discussion of
                 the techniques used to acquire feedback and to evaluate
                 the affect of the TSP on student learning.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Abi-Raad:2000:SAA,
  author =       "Maurice Abi-Raad",
  title =        "Systems analysis with attitude!",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "57--60",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343075",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Have you ever been overruled by your students in
                 critical decisions relating to their learning? Have you
                 ever attended your own classes as a guest consultant
                 with pre-defined scope of input? Have you ever suffered
                 from the fact that each student is different, and you
                 have a standard program for all? Have you ever
                 empowered your students, and watch them exceed your
                 expectation? The only important question is whether you
                 have the courage to throw out your safety nets and Do
                 It. For those who are looking to be involved in an
                 exciting, challenging, stimulating and rewarding
                 teaching exercise, Systems Analysis with attitude is
                 definitely it. Interested! We were too when we
                 attempted this experiment that we do recommend to
                 colleagues in this always-evolving analysis
                 discipline.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Faulkner:2000:EUE,
  author =       "Xristine Faulkner and Fintan Culwin",
  title =        "Enter the usability engineer: integrating {HCI} and
                 software engineering",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "61--64",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343076",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "This paper examines the role of Human Computer
                 Interaction in the context of the Computer Science and
                 Software Engineering curricula. We suggest there needs
                 to be much more integration between Computer Science
                 and HCI. We believe this can be brought about by
                 adopting HCI as the underlying principle to the
                 development of systems. Usability engineering would
                 provide the necessary framework for the development of
                 usable systems.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Normark:2000:SWB,
  author =       "Kurt N{\o}rmark",
  title =        "A suite of {WWW}-based tools for advanced course
                 management",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "65--68",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343078",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "A collection of tools for creation of advanced and
                 comprehensive course home pages is presented. The tools
                 cover the spectrum from course overview pages and
                 hypertext teaching materials to interactive services
                 that support the teaching activities during the course.
                 From the teacher's perspective the tools allow for
                 abstraction from details and automation of routine work
                 in the authoring process. Seen from a student's
                 perspective the comprehensive linking of course plans,
                 teaching material, and interactive services provides
                 for a valuable organization of a large body of
                 information.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Ou:2000:IIW,
  author =       "Kuo-Liang Ou and Gwo-Dong Chen and Chen-Chung Liu and
                 Baw-Jhiune Liu",
  title =        "Instructional instruments for {Web} group learning
                 systems: the grouping, intervention, and strategy",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "69--72",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343079",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Owing to the lack of face-to-face interactions,
                 students using a web-based learning system are likely
                 to study alone and with relatively little classmate
                 support and pressure. Teachers in a web-based learning
                 system may apply the group-learning model to overcome
                 this problem. Therefore, teachers first need to
                 organize, manage, and monitor the group learning.
                 Additionally, they must take appropriate actions based
                 on teaching strategies to improve the learning
                 achievements of the students. To perform these tasks
                 effectively, the teachers must obtain relevant
                 information by searching and analyzing the huge amount
                 of web-access logs or by monitoring web interactions.
                 This will be burdensome and difficult to do well for
                 the teachers. This work presents novel methodologies
                 for developing instruments to assist teachers in
                 performing grouping, intervention and strategy
                 analysis. The proposed methodologies apply data mining
                 tools provided by existing database management systems.
                 A tool is initially R developed to assist in organizing
                 learning groups according to teacher specifications.
                 Database techniques, including multidimensional cube,
                 are then applied to make student web logs meaningful
                 and helpful to teachers in managing group learning. The
                 associate rule mining tool is finally employed to
                 assist teachers in analyzing their pedagogical
                 strategies. These tools relieve the teacher of tedious
                 data collection and analysis, and thus can focus on
                 managing the groups to promote student learning
                 achievement.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Khuri:2000:IPL,
  author =       "Sami Khuri and Hsiu-Chin Hsu",
  title =        "Interactive packages for learning image compression
                 algorithms",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "73--76",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343081",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "This paper introduces three interactive packages for
                 learning image compression algorithms. The first two
                 packages, RLE and Quadtree, animate bitmap image
                 compression algorithms, and the third package, JPEG, is
                 a tutorial about the Joint Photographic Expert Group
                 (JPEG) standard. The goal in designing and developing
                 the packages was to provide instructors with tutorial
                 and demonstration tools for teaching various
                 interesting algorithms to students in CS1/CS2, Data
                 Structures and Algorithms, Data Compression and Image
                 Processing courses. The packages visualize image
                 compression algorithms by displaying their different
                 states of execution, using different colors to
                 highlight the important areas, and providing textual
                 explanations to help users understand the
                 visualization. All three packages are interactive,
                 platform-independent, and easy to use.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Klassner:2000:CWD,
  author =       "Frank Klassner",
  title =        "Can {Web} development courses avoid obsolescence?",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "77--80",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343083",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Yes.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Ginat:2000:CEE,
  author =       "David Ginat",
  title =        "Colorful examples for elaborating exploration of
                 regularities in high-school {CS1}",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "81--84",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343085",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Exploration of regularities is a key element in
                 problem analysis --- the primary stage of algorithm
                 design. The recognition of regularities during problem
                 analysis elicits underlying principles of the design.
                 While university teachers are well aware of the
                 significance of regularities, high-school computer
                 science teachers often fail to appreciate it, and focus
                 on technical details of program design and
                 implementation. We believe that the elaboration of
                 regularities in high-school computer science education
                 enhances teachers' and students' scientific conception
                 of computer science. In this paper we present an
                 approach for elaborating the role of regularities. The
                 elaboration is done by directing the students, at the
                 primary stage of problem analysis, to look for problem
                 characteristics from various angles, in different ways,
                 and for diverse tasks. Our approach is based on
                 colorful and attractive examples, which include
                 challenging problems and games, often with physical
                 objects. Such examples enrich the students' intuition,
                 and leave a long-term imprint.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Weber-Wulff:2000:CCW,
  author =       "Debora Weber-Wulff",
  title =        "Combating the code warrior: a different sort of
                 programming instruction",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "85--88",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343088",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Many CS101 courses purport to teach object-oriented
                 programming, but many seem to be directly translated
                 from traditional structured programming courses. Lynn
                 Andrea Stein's ``Rethinking CS101'' program at MIT
                 offers a radically different approach to teaching OO
                 programming by concentrating on the interactive aspects
                 of object-oriented systems. This approach has the added
                 advantage that students who have previously learned
                 ``programming'' must also relearn how to approach the
                 problems involved in programming interactive systems.
                 This paper reports on the author's use of this concept
                 outside of MIT, with encouraging results.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Zeller:2000:MSR,
  author =       "Andreas Zeller",
  title =        "Making students read and review code",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "89--92",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343090",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "The Praktomat system allows students to read, review,
                 and assess each other's programs in order to improve
                 quality and style. After a successful submission, the
                 student can retrieve and review a program of some
                 fellow student selected by Praktomat. After the review
                 is complete, the student may obtain reviews and
                 re-submit improved versions of his program. The
                 reviewing process is independent of grading; the risk
                 of plagiarism is narrowed by personalized assignments
                 and automatic testing of submitted programs. In a
                 survey, more than two thirds of the students affirmed
                 that reading each other's programs improved their
                 program quality; this is also confirmed by statistical
                 data.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Greening:2000:SSF,
  author =       "Tony Greening",
  title =        "Students seen flocking in programming assignments",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "93--96",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343091",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Programming assignments are typically constructed with
                 great precision, in order to ensure that students
                 traverse the important content areas in the unit. This
                 paper makes a case for an ``ill-defined'', large
                 programming task by presenting experiences with an
                 assignment based on flocking behavior. Providing
                 students meet the criteria that their artificial life
                 forms clearly exhibit flocking behavior, they become
                 responsible for defining the exact nature of the task.
                 The success of this approach is partly measured by the
                 ability of novice programmers who fully engage with the
                 course material to produce spectacular results. The
                 paper includes a discussion of the philosophical
                 requirements for adopting such an approach within a
                 programming unit.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Koppleman:2000:TPD,
  author =       "Herman Koppleman and Charles P. A. G. van der Mast and
                 Elisabeth M. A. G. van Dijk and Gerrit C. van der
                 Veer",
  title =        "Team projects in distance education: a case in {HCI}
                 design",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "97--100",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343092",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Until recently it was difficult to incorporate team
                 projects in distance education. Nowadays, however, new
                 technology is available which allows for distance
                 teamwork. In this paper we will describe a
                 project-oriented course on human-computer interaction.
                 The course is meant for computer science students in
                 distance education. A serious restriction is caused by
                 the fact that the students study at home, where they
                 usually only have a slow connection to Internet at
                 their disposal. We will focus on the way we structured
                 the course to make distance teamwork possible.
                 Furthermore the tools we offered the students will be
                 discussed. Finally, in the paper we will present the
                 first experiences gained in a pilot project with 12
                 computer science students.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Pullen:2000:IBL,
  author =       "J. Mark Pullen",
  title =        "The {Internet}-based lecture: converging teaching and
                 technology",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "101--104",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343094",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Network-based distributed education is a reality
                 today. At George Mason University, we have been
                 pursuing a capability beyond the widespread practice of
                 supporting courses with webpages: delivering lectures
                 and seminars in real time, over the Internet. This
                 paper describes the range of distributed education
                 technologies available today, focusing on issues of
                 instructor presentation, student participation, and
                 temporal qualities of response to student questions.
                 The analysis supports our selection of desktop
                 audiographics for synchronous Internet-based course
                 delivery. Courses that have been presented in this mode
                 are described, along with factors influencing their
                 success and factors in student participation.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{vonWright:2000:DTS,
  author =       "Joakim von Wright",
  title =        "Distance tutorials in a systems design course",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "105--107",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343123",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "An experiment with distance technology in a
                 second-year Object-Oriented Systems Design course is
                 described. Video and computer conferencing were used in
                 tutorial sessions where a teacher and a student group
                 developed and discussed solutions (both textual and
                 graphical) to systems design problems. The experiment
                 is evaluated, both from a technical, an economic and an
                 educational point of view.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Rosbottom:2000:GML,
  author =       "John Rosbottom and Jonathan Crellin and Dave Fysh",
  title =        "A generic model for on-line learning",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "108--111",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343131",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "We describe a generic model for on-line learning which
                 has been used to develop a course unit in Computer
                 Science, and to evaluate a course unit in Economics.
                 The model may be used to produce a template for on-line
                 learning resources. Alternatively a template developed
                 intuitively by an experienced teacher may be evaluated
                 using the generic model. Using these approaches both
                 the model and the template may be refined. We also
                 study the use of the model and templates as ways of
                 disseminating web-based on-line learning among
                 colleagues in Economics and Computer Science
                 departments.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Chalk:2000:ALS,
  author =       "Peter Chalk",
  title =        "Apprenticeship learning of software engineering using
                 {Webworlds}",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "112--115",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343132",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "There is an increasing use of the World Wide Web in
                 the teaching of topics in computer science. Many
                 examples involving animation have been reported and
                 other modeling environments (or 'Webworlds'), such as
                 diagramming tools, are emerging. The software
                 engineering curriculum includes topics such as testing
                 and design, which can be supported by graphical
                 editors. This paper presents three examples of software
                 produced to support learning in this area and a
                 detailed analysis of the results of one pilot research
                 study. Taken as a whole, the evidence is argued to
                 support the case for apprenticeship learning and that
                 the Web provides an opportunity to exploit this, if
                 collaborative and other tools properly scaffold it.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Spalter:2000:IIC,
  author =       "Anne Morgan Spalter and Rosemary Michelle Simpson",
  title =        "Integrating interactive computer-based learning
                 experiences into established curricula: a case study",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "116--119",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343134",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Educators who wish to integrate interactive
                 computer-based learning experiences into established
                 courses must contend not only with the difficulty of
                 creating quality digital content but with the often
                 equally difficult challenge of reconfiguring their
                 courses to use such materials. We describe our
                 experiences with the Exploratories Project at Brown
                 University [8] and the use of exploratories in an
                 introductory computer graphics programming course [4].
                 We offer examples of both success and failure, with the
                 goal of helping other educators avoid both painful
                 mistakes and lost time spent coping with unforeseen
                 logistical and pedagogical concerns. Among the lessons
                 we learned: planning can't begin too early for the
                 integration of such materials into an established
                 curriculum, and all possible methods of integration
                 should be considered before committing to any specific
                 approach.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Shang:2000:ATC,
  author =       "Yi Shang and Hongchi Shi and Su-Shing Chen",
  title =        "Agent technology in computer science and engineering
                 curriculum",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "120--123",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343137",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "In recent years, agent technology has been used
                 increasingly in information management and distributed
                 computing. A CSE curriculum that cultivates the
                 knowledge of agent technology will increase the
                 likelihood that the next generation of IT professionals
                 have the background needed to design and develop
                 software systems that are scalable, reliable,
                 adaptable, and secure. In this paper, we present the
                 rationale and our practice in incorporating agent
                 technology into the CSE curriculum. We develop
                 agent-based teaching materials and software modules and
                 apply them to existing CSE courses including artificial
                 intelligence, parallel and distributed processing,
                 networking, and software engineering. Promising results
                 have been obtained in teaching two graduate level
                 courses using agent components.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Carr:2000:PCL,
  author =       "Steve Carr and Ching-Kuang Shene",
  title =        "A portable class library for teaching multithreaded
                 programming",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "124--127",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343138",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Last:2000:ISF,
  author =       "Mary Z. Last and Mats Daniels and Vicki L. Almstrum
                 and Carl Erickson and Bruce Klein",
  title =        "An international student\slash faculty collaboration:
                 the Runestone project",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "128--131",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343140",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Students of today need to be prepared to work in
                 globally distributed organizations. Part of that
                 preparation involves teaching students to work
                 effectively in teams to solve problems. Students also
                 must be able to work with individuals located at
                 distant sites where there is no or very little
                 face-to-face interaction. The Runestone project, an
                 international collaboration between two universities,
                 adds new dimensions to student teamwork, requiring
                 students to handle collaboration that is remote,
                 cross-cultural, and technically challenging. Runestone
                 is a three-year project funded by the Swedish Council
                 for the Renewal of Undergraduate Education. A pilot
                 study in 1998 was followed by a full-scale
                 implementation in 1999 with another implementation
                 ongoing in 2000.Each time this global cooperation
                 project is run, both students and faculty learn
                 important lessons in how to work with each other in a
                 virtual environment. This paper discusses both student
                 and faculty learning outcomes for Runestone 1999.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Kelemen:2000:OCB,
  author =       "Charles Kelemen and Allen Tucker and Peter Henderson
                 and Owen Astrachan and Kim Bruce",
  title =        "Has our curriculum become math-phobic? (an {American}
                 perspective)",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "132--135",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343143",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "We are concerned about a view in undergraduate
                 computer science education, especially in the early
                 courses, that it's okay to be math-phobic and still
                 prepare oneself to become a computer scientist. Our
                 view is the contrary: that any serious study of
                 computer science requires students to achieve
                 mathematical maturity (especially in discrete
                 mathematics) early in their undergraduate studies, thus
                 becoming well-prepared to integrate mathematical ideas,
                 notations, and methodologies throughout their study of
                 computer science. A major curricular implication of
                 this theme is that the prerequisite expectations and
                 conceptual level of the first discrete mathematics
                 course should be the same as it is for the first
                 calculus course --- secondary school pre-calculus and
                 trigonometry. Ultimately, calculus, linear algebra, and
                 statistics are also essential for computer science
                 majors, but none should occur earlier than discrete
                 mathematics. This paper explains our concerns and
                 outlines our response as a series of examples and
                 recommendations for future action.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Wu:2000:EPN,
  author =       "Congxin Wu and Bokan Zhang",
  title =        "Embedding problem of noncompact fuzzy number space {E}
                 ~ {(II)}",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "135--142",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343062",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Davy:2000:SWB,
  author =       "J. R. Davy and K. Audin and M. Barkham and C. Joyner",
  title =        "Student well-being in a computing department",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "136--139",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343145",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "We describe a project exploring the relationships
                 between factors in the learning environment, student
                 well-being and learning outcomes, in the context of a
                 Computing department. A range of established
                 psychometric tests identified areas of unhelpful stress
                 in the working environment and measures were
                 implemented to rectify these. A significant improvement
                 in measured student well-being followed.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Maj:2000:CTT,
  author =       "S. P. Maj and D. Veal and P. Charlesworth",
  title =        "Is computer technology taught upside down?",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "140--143",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343147",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "There has been a continuing fragmentation of
                 traditional computer science into other disciplines
                 such as Multimedia, e-commerce, software engineering
                 etc. In this context the standard computer technology
                 curriculum designed for computer science students is in
                 danger of becoming perceived as increasingly irrelevant
                 --- both by students and employers. The authors review
                 expectations of both students and employers, as
                 determined by market analysis, and present the results
                 of implementing one possible solution to providing an
                 introductory computer technology curriculum suitable
                 not only for students from other disciplines but also
                 as a basis for Computer Science majors.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Odekirk:2000:TSC,
  author =       "Elizabeth Odekirk and Dominic Jones and Peter Jensen",
  title =        "Three semesters of {CSO} using {Java}: assignments and
                 experiences",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "144--147",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343148",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "A CSO class with heavy lab emphasis was developed at
                 the University of Utah in the summer of 1998. It has
                 been taught three times by different instructors to
                 students who were diverse in background, gender, and
                 skill level. The culmination of these efforts is a set
                 of original labs which can be divided into several
                 chronological categories: a gentle introduction,
                 computation and events, interaction and graphical user
                 interfaces, algorithms, object-oriented programming,
                 and Java specific issues. These labs encompassed
                 several themes which guided the curriculum in all three
                 semesters: creativity, visual and interactive methods,
                 and breadth. This paper is a combined summary of these
                 experiences.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Fagin:2000:UAB,
  author =       "Barry Fagin",
  title =        "Using {Ada}-based robotics to teach computer science",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "148--151",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343150",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Hosny:2000:IJB,
  author =       "H. Hosny and O. Khaled and M. E. Fathalla",
  title =        "{ILE}: a {Java}-based environment for {CS} courses",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "152--155",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343152",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "This paper provides an overview of the Interactive Lab
                 Environment (ILE) project and a report on its current
                 status and future directions. ILE is the framework of a
                 customized interactive lab environment for computing
                 concepts and courseware that we developed for our
                 department using Java. In essence ILE is a
                 well-managed, networked set of resources that offers
                 its users a collection of tools. The most significant
                 of these tools are the flexible routes through an
                 interactive learning environment combining the
                 presentation of course information and notes,
                 executable examples of learning materials, visual tools
                 for presenting new concepts that are otherwise hard to
                 visualize, and a quick means of communication within
                 the academic unit. In addition to the ILE framework
                 itself and a few course material demos, two interactive
                 components were developed and implemented thus far,
                 both of which are visual tools but with differing
                 degrees of abstraction and disclosure.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Raab:2000:PPT,
  author =       "Jeff Raab and Richard Rasala and Viera K. Proulx",
  title =        "Pedagogical power tools for teaching {Java}",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "156--159",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343155",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "We describe a Java toolkit that is designed to support
                 the creation of powerful and extensible GUI interfaces
                 during the first year computer science course. The
                 goals of this toolkit are to provide: $ \bullet $ an
                 infrastructure for creating well designed programs that
                 illustrates the concepts of computer science and its
                 practical applications $ \bullet $ an environment for
                 learning the basic ideas of interface design and for
                 experimenting with a variety of designs $ \bullet $ a
                 paradigm for building interfaces in Java that scales
                 from individual data items to large structures, using
                 recursively displayable container classes.
                 Additionally, the toolkit classes themselves can be
                 studied as examples of proper object oriented design,
                 and of building event listeners.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Korhonen:2000:ASA,
  author =       "Ari Korhonen and Lauri Malmi",
  title =        "Algorithm simulation with automatic assessment",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "160--163",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343157",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Visualization is a useful aid for understanding the
                 working of algorithms. Therefore many interactive
                 algorithm animation tools have been developed. However,
                 students may misinterpret the visualization and
                 therefore the correctness of their interpretation
                 should be confirmed by tests supplemented with
                 feedback. In this paper, a learning environment for
                 data structures and algorithms is presented. The
                 combination of algorithm animation and simulation with
                 automatic assessment provides a way to give meaningful
                 feedback to the students. Our experience shows that
                 this combination is of great value for the students
                 studying algorithms.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Jackson:2000:SAA,
  author =       "David Jackson",
  title =        "A semi-automated approach to online assessment",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "164--167",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343160",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Desirable though fully automated assessment of student
                 programming assignments is, it is an area that is beset
                 by difficulties. While it is not contested that some
                 aspects of assessment can be performed much more
                 efficiently and accurately by computer, there are many
                 others that still require human involvement. We have
                 therefore designed a system that combines the strengths
                 of the two approaches, the assessment software calling
                 upon the skills of the human tutor where necessary to
                 make sensible judgements. The technique has been used
                 successfully on a systems programming course for
                 several years, and student feedback has been
                 supportive.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{English:2000:EAA,
  author =       "John English and Phil Siviter",
  title =        "Experience with an automatically assessed course",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "168--171",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343161",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "This paper describes our experiences of developing and
                 running an introductory module for first year Computing
                 undergraduates. The 'Supporting Technologies' module is
                 intended to equip students with basic computing skills
                 that they will need for the rest of their course. A
                 novel feature of the work discussed here is that
                 several different automated assessment tools and
                 techniques are integrated into a common framework
                 sharing a common results database. This allows a wide
                 range of different assessment formats within the same
                 module framework.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Greening:2000:CDD,
  author =       "Tony Greening and Glenn Stevens and David Stratton",
  title =        "A case for data-driven testing",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "172--175",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343163",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "This paper describes a novel approach to the on-line
                 assessment of large groups of students, in which it may
                 be desirable to maintain common questions between the
                 groups. It is clear from the literature that computer
                 based assessment has the potential to dramatically
                 reduce the effort involved in testing and marking
                 however problems arise where the cohort of students is
                 larger than the number of available computers. However,
                 the opposite situation is often true in practice, due
                 to the perceived need to design multiple tests. The
                 solution described here uses a small computer
                 laboratory (20 machines) to administer a test to a
                 series of groups of students in existing lab sessions.
                 Each group receives the same set of questions but the
                 data to which the questions apply, and hence the test
                 answers, vary from group to group. The data from tests
                 that have been applied to students is analysed to
                 determine whether discussions with early candidates
                 have influenced the performance of students in later
                 testing sessions.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Sutinen:2000:FCP,
  author =       "Erkki Sutinen",
  title =        "Future challenges in program visualization (panel
                 session)",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "176--177",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343165",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "As an interdisciplinary topic, program visualization
                 research needs a comprehensive approach, in order to be
                 useful for college education and research, as well as
                 software engineering. This main challenge consists of
                 several aspects, like developing efficient
                 visualization techniques, composing attractive pilot
                 environments, analyzing visualizations from the
                 cognitive point of view, creating functional taxonomies
                 to compare various environments, supporting teamwork in
                 algorithm design and programming, and designing field
                 testing methods to evaluate a given visualization
                 environment.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Klein:2000:TII,
  author =       "Bruce J. Klein and Mats Daniels and Dianne Hagan and
                 Anders Berglund and Annegret Goold and Mary Last and
                 Tony Clear and Erkki Sutinen",
  title =        "Teaching inter-institutional courses (panel session):
                 sharing challenges and resources",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "178--179",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343166",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Boyle:2000:DIT,
  author =       "Robert Boyle",
  title =        "Do it themselves",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "180--180",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343169",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Ellis:2000:TMD,
  author =       "Ainslie Ellis",
  title =        "Toolbook multimedia demonstrations for {Java}
                 programming",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "181--181",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343174",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "This paper describes a set of multimedia
                 demonstrations built to facilitate the learning of
                 introductory Java programming. They provide
                 demonstrations of complex processes and concepts that
                 are difficult, if not impossible, to present using more
                 traditional media used in lectures.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Gerhardt-Powals:2000:GLN,
  author =       "Jill Gerhardt-Powals",
  title =        "Have a great lab without needing roller skates",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "182--182",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343175",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Hobbs:2000:EGL,
  author =       "Mike Hobbs",
  title =        "Email groups for learning and assessment",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "183--183",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343177",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Holliday:2000:KBS,
  author =       "Mark A. Holliday",
  title =        "A kernel-based synchronization assignment for the
                 operating systems course",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "184--184",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343180",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Anderson:2000:AVU,
  author =       "Jay Martin Anderson",
  title =        "Algorithm visualization using {QuickTime} movies for
                 student interaction (poster session).: algorithms from
                 computational geometry",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "185--185",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343182",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Barros:2000:VAC,
  author =       "Jo{\~a}o Paulo Barros and Rui Pais",
  title =        "A versatile assignment in {CS} 2 (poster session): a
                 file compression utility based on the {Huffman} code",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "185--185",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343183",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Bland:2000:APL,
  author =       "Constance G. Bland and Pamela B. Lawhead",
  title =        "Agents, profiles, learning styles and tutors (poster
                 session)",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "185--185",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343184",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Burgos:2000:ASD,
  author =       "J. M. Burgos and J. Galve and J. Garc{\'\i}a and J. J.
                 Moreno and S. Mu{\~n}oz and D. Vill{\'e}n",
  title =        "Abstract solution design by specification refinement",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "186--186",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343186",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Carter:2000:WSS,
  author =       "Janet Carter",
  title =        "What the students said about plagiarism",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "186--186",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343188",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Chang:2000:DLP,
  author =       "Chih-Kai Chang",
  title =        "Discovering learning patterns from {Web} logs by
                 concept transformation analysis (poster session)",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "186--187",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343204",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Chong:2000:MMC,
  author =       "Ng S. T. Chong and Masao Sakauchi",
  title =        "A multi-modal chat for coordinated interaction (poster
                 session)",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "187--187",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343205",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Davidovic:2000:SEB,
  author =       "Alex Davidovic and James Warren and Elena Tricina",
  title =        "Structural example-based adaptive tutoring system
                 (poster session) {(SEATS)}",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "187--187",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343208",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Delgado:2000:EKE,
  author =       "Gladys Garc{\'\i}a Delgado",
  title =        "Ethical knowledge for an electronic era (poster
                 session)",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "187--188",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343210",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Eremin:2000:SSL,
  author =       "Evgeny Eremin",
  title =        "Software system to learn objects (poster session)",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "188--188",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343212",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Goold:2000:UBC,
  author =       "Annegret Goold and Russell Rimmer",
  title =        "Undergraduates in business computing and computer
                 science (poster session)",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "188--188",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343214",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Hagan:2000:UBT,
  author =       "Dianne Hagan",
  title =        "Using {BlueJ} to teach {Java} (poster session)",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "188--189",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343216",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Kajaval:2000:PGI,
  author =       "Jorma Kajaval and Rauno Varonen",
  title =        "The professional growth of {ICT} experts through
                 progressive sandwich training (poster session)",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "189--189",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343218",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Koldehofe:2000:LPS,
  author =       "Boris Koldehofe and Marina Papatriantafilou and
                 Philippas Tsigas",
  title =        "{LYDIAN} (poster session): an extensible educational
                 animation environment for distributed algorithms",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "189--189",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343220",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Kosa:2000:DAD,
  author =       "Martha J. Kosa",
  title =        "Distributed algorithms in the discrete mathematics
                 course (poster session)",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "189--190",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343222",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Manne:2000:CCP,
  author =       "Fredrik Manne",
  title =        "Competing in computing (poster session)",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "190--190",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343223",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Mento:2000:IMT,
  author =       "Barbara Mento and Donna Tupper and Kathleen Harmeyer
                 and Sylvia Sorkin",
  title =        "{Internet} and multimedia technology curriculum
                 development (poster session)",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "190--191",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343225",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Odekirk:2000:ASP,
  author =       "Elizabeth Odekirk",
  title =        "Analyzing student programs (poster session)",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "191--191",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343226",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Rossling:2000:TPS,
  author =       "Guido R{\"o}{\ss}ling and Bernd Freisleben",
  title =        "{TOPKAPI} (poster session): a tool for performing
                 knowledge tests over the {WWW}",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "191--191",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343227",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Satrazemi:2000:TEE,
  author =       "M. Satrazemi and V. Dajdiielis",
  title =        "Telemachus an effective electronic marker of students'
                 programming assignments (poster session)",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "191--192",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343231",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Scanlan:2000:SPM,
  author =       "David A. Scanlan",
  title =        "Student preference for multimedia-based lectures
                 (poster session): a preliminary report",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "192--192",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343232",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Sheard:2000:SDS,
  author =       "Judy Sheard and Margot Postema and Selby Markham",
  title =        "Subject differences in student attitudes to
                 paper-based and {Web}-based resources (poster
                 session)",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "192--193",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343235",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Shene:2000:CGU,
  author =       "Ching-Kuang Shene and John Lowther",
  title =        "Computing with geometry as an undergraduate course
                 (poster session)",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "193--193",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343237",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Shene:2000:DPS,
  author =       "Ching-Kuang Shene and John Lowther",
  title =        "{DesignMentor} (poster session): a pedagogical tool
                 for graphics and computer-aided design",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "193--193",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343239",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Shin:2000:PTL,
  author =       "Soo-Bum Shin and In-Hwan Yoo and Chul-Hyun Lee and
                 Tae-Wuk Lee",
  title =        "Plan of teaching \& learning for database software
                 through situated learning (poster session)",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "193--194",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343241",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Sooriamurthi:2000:URT,
  author =       "Raja Sooriamurthi",
  title =        "Using recursion as a tool to reinforce functional
                 abstraction (poster session)",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "194--194",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343243",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Stratton:2000:NPS,
  author =       "David Stratton",
  title =        "``Network protocols and services'': a non-specialist
                 approach to teaching networking (poster session)",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "194--194",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343245",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Terada:2000:PPS,
  author =       "Minoru Terada",
  title =        "Program paper-slide-show (poster session)",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "194--195",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343246",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Thompson:2000:LPM,
  author =       "Errol Thompson",
  title =        "Learning process maturity (poster session)",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "195--195",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343244",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Yoo:2000:PSD,
  author =       "In-Hwan Yoo and Soo-Bum Shin and Chul-Hyun Lee and
                 Tae-Wuk Lee",
  title =        "Present status and direction of information curriculum
                 of Korea",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "195--195",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/353519.343249",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:43 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Williams:2000:DWT,
  author =       "Michael R. Williams",
  title =        "Do we teach computer science as religion or as
                 history?",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "4--5",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/369295.369300",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:45 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Gotterbarn:2000:BUW,
  author =       "Don Gotterbarn",
  title =        "On being a {UCITArian}: winning the race to the
                 bottom",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "6--7",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/369295.369302",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:45 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Martin:2000:MDS,
  author =       "C. Dianne Martin",
  title =        "More on the ``dark side'' of computing",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "8--9",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/369295.369303",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:45 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Lee:2000:HCS,
  author =       "John A. N. Lee",
  title =        "History in computer science education: across the
                 curriculum initiatives",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "9--10",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/369295.369304",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:45 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Clear:2000:CVC,
  author =       "Tony Clear",
  title =        "Competition versus cooperation: models for computer
                 education?",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "11--12",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/369295.369305",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:45 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Gorgone:2000:CAV,
  author =       "John T. Gorgone",
  title =        "{CSAB} authorizes visits to test {IS\slash IT}
                 proposed accreditation criteria",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "13--14",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/369295.369307",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:45 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{McCauley:2000:CSE,
  author =       "Ren{\'e}e McCauley",
  title =        "Computer science education links --- what next?",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "14--15",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/369295.369309",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:45 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Knox:2000:PPI,
  author =       "Deborah L. Knox",
  title =        "A preview of the premier issue of {JERIC}",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "15--16",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/369295.369310",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:45 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Walker:2000:BFT,
  author =       "Henry M. Walker",
  title =        "Balancing the forest and the trees in courses",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "17--18",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/369295.369311",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:45 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Gersting:2000:EEIb,
  author =       "Judith L. Gersting and Frank H. Young",
  title =        "Experiences with ethical issues: part 2",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "18--19",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/369295.369312",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:45 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Ginat:2000:PC,
  author =       "David Ginat",
  title =        "Placement calculations",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "20--21",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/369295.369313",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:45 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Shaffer:2000:IBD,
  author =       "Dale Shaffer",
  title =        "{Internet}-based distance learning: a
                 multi-continental perspective",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "22--23",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/369295.369314",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:45 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Pijls:2000:LLP,
  author =       "Wim Pijls",
  title =        "{LR} and {LL} parsing: some new points of view",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "24--27",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/369295.369315",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:45 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "The two best known parsing algorithms are LR and LL
                 parsing respectively. These algorithms are explained
                 extensively in the vast literature on compiler
                 construction and formal language theory. In almost any
                 textbook, LR and LL are regarded as two distinct
                 methods. In this paper we will show that there exists a
                 clear relationship between those methods, putting them
                 into one framework. To our experience, such a framework
                 is very useful from a didactic point of view. Moreover,
                 the relationship between LR and LL provides a deeper
                 insight into each separate method.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Olagunju:2000:RSD,
  author =       "Amos O. Olagunju",
  title =        "The role of scientific discovery in teaching and
                 learning of computer science",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "28--31",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/369295.369316",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:45 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "The importance of the roles of mathematics and
                 engineering in the use of computers for solving real
                 world problems cannot be over emphasized. This paper
                 advocates the engagement of professors with diversified
                 experiences of the applications of computers in the
                 real world in teaching lower level computer science
                 courses such as experiments designed to characterize
                 Fibonacci and higher order similar sequences. With the
                 goal of illustrating how scientific discovery
                 experiments are designed, the paper shows certain
                 connections between different areas of mathematics and
                 computer science.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Siltaneva:2000:NED,
  author =       "Jarmo Siltaneva and Erkki M{\"a}kinen",
  title =        "A note on the expected distribution of degrees in
                 random binary trees",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "32--33",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/369295.369317",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:45 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "We derive the expected numbers of nodes with 0, 1, and
                 2 children in random binary trees by using only
                 elementary methods and concepts.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Al-Salman:2000:CSE,
  author =       "Abdulmalik S. Al-Salman and Jacob Adeniyi",
  title =        "Computer science education in a {Saudi Arabian}
                 university: a comparative study of its {B.Sc.}
                 program",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "34--39",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/369295.369318",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:45 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "The computer science curriculum at a university in the
                 Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is described and then compared
                 to with the CSAC/ABET accreditation criteria. The
                 comparison is needed to determine the relevance of the
                 curriculum in view of the dynamism and perturbations
                 arising from the reality of the real world and
                 CSAC/ABET criteria. The curriculum emphasizes breadth
                 and depth in the main areas of computer science
                 education and makes systems and systems development as
                 its main subject area of expertise. The policy to adopt
                 breadth and depth was based on the fact that Saudi
                 Arabia is a young and rapidly developing country and
                 computer science education in the country is at its
                 infancy. The pre-college curriculum in the kingdom is
                 lacking in computer science. In addition, computer
                 science is a rapidly developing field. The graduates
                 from this program were expected to be pioneering
                 professionals in the emerging market of computer
                 employment in the kingdom. The curriculum attempts to
                 serve as a catalyst, providing a platform for
                 discussion, which hopefully will result into a feedback
                 to us. We also hope that the curriculum will serve as a
                 guidance to third world countries which are in the same
                 circumstances with limited capabilities and resources
                 who may want to address the critical issues involved in
                 computer science education.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Matos:2000:RRA,
  author =       "Victor Matos and Rebecca Grasser",
  title =        "{RELAX} --- the relational algebra pocket calculator
                 project",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "40--44",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/369295.369320",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:45 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Database courses benefit from the abundance of
                 commercial SQL systems available today. Unfortunately,
                 the same cannot be said about the relational algebra
                 query language. This article considers a lab experience
                 to integrate the learning of these two important
                 topics. In the process of implementing the project, the
                 student acquires practical knowledge in areas such as
                 database programming, parsing and compiling, dynamic
                 SQL code generation, object linking and embedding
                 technologies (OLE), and problem solving skills using
                 the framework of relational algebra. This activity is
                 applied to a traditional second semester database
                 theory course and appears to be very beneficial to the
                 student.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Reese:2000:UMG,
  author =       "Donna S. Reese",
  title =        "Using multiplayer games to teach interprocess
                 communication mechanisms",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "45--47",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/369295.369321",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:45 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "An advanced operating system (OS) course teaches
                 students how the OS mechanisms that they have learned
                 in OS I are implemented. Solaris and Windows NT are
                 used to illustrate these implementations. This course
                 covers the major aspects of OS functionality and
                 addresses both OS design issues and user level
                 programming issues. The area of inter-process
                 communication is not conceptually difficult for
                 students to grasp, but the actual implementation and
                 use of these concepts requires some practice. For the
                 past three years, the author has experimented with the
                 use of multi-player games as a mechanism for teaching
                 students these programming constructs. This paper
                 reports on these experiences.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Pareja-Flores:2000:LVC,
  author =       "Crist{\'o}bal Pareja-Flores and J. {\'A}ngel
                 Vel{\'a}zquez-Iturbide",
  title =        "Local versus comprehensive assignments: two
                 complementary approaches",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "48--51",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/369295.369322",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:45 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Two complementary classes of assignments, local and
                 comprehensive, are advocated with different goals and
                 features. The aim of describing both classes of
                 assignments provides guidance to teachers in their
                 design. Local assignments ideally provide an in-depth
                 coverage of only one concept, whereas global ones
                 ideally provide a breadth coverage of most of the
                 concepts studied in a period of time. Both classes of
                 assignments are illustrated with two motivating
                 programming examples: ``rolling dice'' and ``lights
                 out,'' respectively.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Jacobson:2000:UCE,
  author =       "Norman Jacobson",
  title =        "Using on-computer exams to ensure beginning students'
                 programming competency",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "53--56",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/369295.369324",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:45 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "The first programming course at UC Irvine has
                 traditionally used graded programming assignments to
                 assess students' programming competence and readiness
                 to undertake the programming required in the next
                 course. Problems with this approach led to replacing
                 the assignments with on-computer programming exams.
                 Several improvements in the course and its ability to
                 reliably meet its goals have resulted.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Grissom:2000:PFI,
  author =       "Scott Grissom",
  title =        "A pedagogical framework for introducing {Java I/O} in
                 {CS1}",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "57--59",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/369295.369326",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:45 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "The role of Java for teaching CS1 has received
                 considerable attention. A common concern of many
                 educators is that the Java I/O paradigm is too
                 challenging for novice programmers and that significant
                 time must be devoted to the subject. This additional
                 time may take away from the traditional CS1 content.
                 Four strategies for teaching Java I/O in CS1 are
                 reviewed herein. Text-based versus GUI-based
                 applications represent the two extremes. Advantages and
                 disadvantages are provided for each approach. A
                 description of preliminary work to develop a Java
                 package that makes implementing GUI applications simple
                 is given, with the objective of preparing students for
                 the eventual transition to the Java AWT.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Baldwin:2000:STU,
  author =       "Doug Baldwin",
  title =        "Some thoughts on undergraduate teaching and the
                 {Ph.D}.",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "60--62",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/369295.369327",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:45 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "As the hiring crisis in academic computer science
                 worsens, many people ask whether faculty whose primary
                 job is teaching need doctorates. In the past, the
                 answer would have been ``yes;'' now people increasingly
                 suggest that it could be ``no.'' I have argued in my
                 own department for hiring only faculty with doctorates,
                 because, while the doctorate does not directly train
                 people to teach, it does seem to correlate with many
                 characteristics of a good educator. This paper explores
                 the thinking underlying my view, in hopes that it may
                 help others clarify the needs and reasoning behind
                 their own faculty searches.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Tymann:2000:MSD,
  author =       "Paul T. Tymann and G. Michael Schneider",
  title =        "Modern software development concepts: a new philosophy
                 for {CS2}",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "63--65",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/369295.369329",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:45 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "In this paper we propose a significantly different
                 approach to CS2, the second course in the undergraduate
                 computer science curriculum. Rather than a central
                 focus on the design and implementation of data
                 structures, we propose that the central focus be on
                 modern software development concepts such as
                 object-oriented design, exceptions, GUIs, graphics,
                 collection classes, threads, and networking. We believe
                 that these are the important concepts that students
                 should be exposed to and should use in the second
                 computer science course.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Bosse:2000:RWP,
  author =       "Michael J. Boss{\'e} and N. R. Nandakumar",
  title =        "Real-world problem-solving, pedagogy, and efficient
                 programming algorithms in computer education",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "66--69",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/369295.369332",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:45 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Modern research and curricular reforms equate
                 pedagogical soundness with the connection of
                 instructional content with real-world problems.
                 Software engineers facing real-world computer problems
                 are continually concerned with the efficiency of the
                 program that they write. Divorcing programming concerns
                 from efficiency unsatisfactorily presents the
                 responsibilities and full concerns of computer
                 programmers. Therefore, when programming tasks are
                 simplified to avoid concerns for efficiency, the
                 assignments become antiseptic, lose the nature of
                 real-world problems, and become inconsistent with the
                 true nature of computer programming concerns. This
                 brief investigation considers real-world problems,
                 pedagogy within computer programming education, and the
                 often-missed consideration of efficiency within
                 instructional computer programming assignments.
                 If-then-else algorithms are compared with algorithms
                 using arrays in light of programming efficiency and
                 pedagogy in computer education.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Hamza:2000:CPC,
  author =       "M. Khalid Hamza and Bassem Alhalabi and David M.
                 Marcovitz",
  title =        "Creative pedagogy for computer learning: eight
                 effective tactics",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "32",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "70--73",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2000",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/369295.369335",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:45 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Do your students seem uninterested in learning about
                 computing? Do they complain that the subject matter has
                 no relevant application to the ``real world''? Do they
                 appear baffled, bored, and inattentive? Your mission as
                 a creative facilitator is not to assign a grade; your
                 mission is to educate students to think, learn, and
                 make new connections they never thought possible. A
                 teacher's guidance, constructive feedback, and
                 facilitated instruction should pave the way for
                 students to meaningfully bridge prior knowledge with
                 new knowledge. In this article, the authors suggest
                 eight essential tactics on how teachers might teach
                 creatively, particularly with respect to computing
                 curricula, while they enjoy the teaching and learning
                 processes and reap the pleasures of getting students to
                 think creatively and productively in a complex
                 information world.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Roberts:2001:OM,
  author =       "Eric Roberts",
  title =        "An overview of {MiniJava}",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "1--5",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364525",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "This paper describes the implementation of MiniJava, a
                 teaching-oriented programming language closely based on
                 the Java language developed by Sun Microsystems [6].
                 The core of the MiniJava environment is a restricted
                 subset of the standard Java release and is designed to
                 reduce the intimidation factor introductory students
                 experience when they encounter a system as large as the
                 Java environment. The paper outlines the particular
                 restrictions and extensions that define MiniJava along
                 with pedagogical justifications for each.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Bruce:2001:LSG,
  author =       "Kim B. Bruce and Andrea Danyluk and Thomas Murtagh",
  title =        "A library to support a graphics-based object-first
                 approach to {CS} 1",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "6--10",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364527",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "In this paper we describe a library we have developed
                 that supports an ``OO-from-the-beginning'' approach to
                 CS 1. The use of real graphics ``objects'' and
                 event-driven programming are important components of
                 our approach. The design of interactive graphical
                 programs helps students to both use objects and write
                 methods early while designing and implementing
                 interesting programs.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Koffman:2001:SJP,
  author =       "Elliot Koffman and Ursula Wolz",
  title =        "A simple {Java} package for {GUI}-like interactivity",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "11--15",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364528",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "This paper discusses the motivation for a simple
                 package designed to incorporate user interactivity into
                 a first course in computer science. The package enables
                 novice programmers to build programs with GUI-like
                 interactivity while maintaining good design principles.
                 An advantage of this package is that it is easy to
                 implement using the Swing class. Therefore, it can be
                 used as a case study to illustrate Java features.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Buck:2001:JCS,
  author =       "Duane Buck and David J. Stucki",
  title =        "{JKarelRobot}: a case study in supporting levels of
                 cognitive development in the computer science
                 curriculum",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "16--20",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364529",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "We introduce a new software tool, JKarelRobot, for
                 supporting an Inside/Out pedagogy in introductory
                 programming courses. Extending the original conception
                 of ``Karel the Robot'', with Bloom's Taxonomy of
                 Educational Objectives as a guiding principle, we have
                 provided a mechanism for designing exercises that are
                 cognitively appropriate to the developmental levels of
                 our students. JKarelRobot is platform independent
                 (written in Java) and language/paradigm independent,
                 supporting Pascal, Java, and Lisp style environments.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Ginat:2001:MIA,
  author =       "David Ginat",
  title =        "Misleading intuition in algorithmic problem solving",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "21--25",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364530",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "This paper presents a study of misleading intuition in
                 the domain of algorithmic problem solving. I noticed
                 incorrect intuitive solutions to challenging
                 algorithmic problems and interviewed students on their
                 solutions. The students arrived at an erroneous
                 conviction rather rapidly and demonstrated
                 overconfidence and reinforcement of their incorrect
                 ideas when presented with new evidence. I present two
                 colorful and unfamiliar algorithmic challenges posed to
                 the students, describe and discuss my experience, and
                 offer some suggestions for reducing the effect of
                 misleading intuition.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Bucci:2001:DWR,
  author =       "Paolo Bucci and Timothy J. Long and Bruce W. Weide",
  title =        "Do we really teach abstraction?",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "26--30",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364531",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Abstraction is one of the cornerstones of software
                 development and is recognized as a fundamental and
                 essential principle to be taught as early as CS1/CS2.
                 Abstraction supposedly can enhance students' ability to
                 reason and think. Yet we often hear complaints about
                 the inability of CS undergraduates to do that. Do we
                 supply students with the tools they need to reach their
                 potential to think carefully and to reason rigorously
                 about software behavior? Typically we do not, but as
                 educators there are techniques we can use to help our
                 students develop such skills starting in CS1/CS2.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Mitchener:2001:CRA,
  author =       "W. Garrett Mitchener and Amin Vahdat",
  title =        "A chat room assignment for teaching network security",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "31--35",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364532",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "This paper describes a chat room application suitable
                 for teaching basic network programming and security
                 protocols. A client/server design illustrates the
                 structure of current scalable network services while a
                 multicast version demonstrates the need for efficient
                 simultaneous distribution of network content to
                 multiple receivers (e.g., as required by video
                 broadcasts). The system also includes implementations
                 of two security protocols, one similar to Kerberos and
                 another based on public key encryption.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Hill:2001:UIN,
  author =       "John M. D. Hill and Curtis A. {Carver, Jr.} and
                 Jeffrey W. Humphries and Udo W. Pooch",
  title =        "Using an isolated network laboratory to teach advanced
                 networks and security",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "36--40",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364533",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "This paper discusses the use of an isolated network
                 laboratory to teach computer security using persistent
                 cooperative groups and an active learning approach.
                 Computer security and computer security education are
                 areas of increasing importance as computer systems
                 become more interconnected. When offered, undergraduate
                 and graduate computer security courses are routinely
                 taught using a traditional lecture format. If the
                 course includes a class project, the class project is
                 limited in scope and constitutes a relatively small
                 portion of the student's grade. This paper examines a
                 different approach in which the class project is the
                 dominant factor in the student's grade. The students
                 work in persistent cooperative teams as either a black
                 or gold team. Black teams attempt to break into other
                 black team computers or attack the gold team. The gold
                 team operates Windows NT, LINUX, and Solaris-based
                 servers and attempts to defend their servers and
                 role-play system administrators. The entire exercise
                 takes place in an isolated lab so as to separate
                 student class activities from the rest of the
                 departmental intranet. Four years of experience running
                 the class with this format suggests that the use of
                 persistent cooperative groups and active learning are
                 effective approaches for teaching network security and
                 are preferred over a lecture-based course.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Janzen:2001:ROR,
  author =       "David Janzen",
  title =        "From {RS}-232 to object request brokers: incremental
                 object-oriented networking projects",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "41--44",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364534",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Selecting an appropriate set of laboratory experiences
                 and projects for a Data Communications and Computer
                 Networks course can be difficult due to the broad and
                 deep nature of the topics. Emphasis may be placed on
                 many networking aspects including design, evaluation,
                 efficiency, security, protocols, tools, and
                 applications. This paper presents a set of projects
                 that attempt to integrate software engineering and
                 systems administration topics. The projects emphasize
                 network application programming. Particular attention
                 will be given to a sequence of incremental projects
                 using an object-oriented approach including the use of
                 the Unified Modeling Language (UML) and a design
                 pattern.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Turner:2001:JTV,
  author =       "Joseph A. Turner and Joseph L. Zachary",
  title =        "{Javiva}: a tool for visualizing and validating
                 student-written {Java} programs",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "45--49",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364535",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "The ability to think abstractly about the components
                 of a computer program is critical for computer science
                 students. A student who has not yet developed this
                 ability tends to view a program as an unstructured
                 collection of statements and expressions. Introductory
                 computer science textbooks promote the use of
                 pre-conditions, post-conditions, and abstraction
                 functions as techniques for fostering abstract
                 thinking. Existing programming languages and tools,
                 however, do not generally support these techniques.
                 Consequently, we have built and are beginning to
                 experiment with Javiva. Javiva extracts pre-conditions,
                 post-conditions, and abstraction functions---included
                 as stylized comments in Java source files---and uses
                 them to create instrumented class files. When these
                 instrumented class files are run, they automatically
                 diagnose and report violations by methods of pre- and
                 post-conditions. These classes also exploit abstraction
                 functions to automatically produce abstract
                 visualizations of their objects.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Becker:2001:TCK,
  author =       "Byron Weber Becker",
  title =        "Teaching {CS1} with {Karel} the robot in {Java}",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "50--54",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364536",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Most current Java textbooks for CS1 (and thus most
                 current courses) begin either with fundamentals from
                 the procedural paradigm (assignment, iteration,
                 selection) or with a brief introduction to using
                 objects followed quickly with writing objects. We have
                 found a third way to be most satisfying for both
                 teachers and students: using interesting predefined
                 classes to introduce the fundamentals of
                 object-oriented programming (object instantiation,
                 method calls, inheritance) followed quickly by the
                 traditional fundamentals of iteration and selection,
                 also taught using the same predefined classes. Karel
                 the Robot, developed by Richard Pattis [6] and
                 well-known to many computer science educators, has aged
                 gracefully and is a vital part of our CS1 curriculum.
                 This paper explains how Karel may be used and the
                 advantages of doing so.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Odekirk-Hash:2001:AFP,
  author =       "Elizabeth Odekirk-Hash and Joseph L. Zachary",
  title =        "Automated feedback on programs means students need
                 less help from teachers",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "55--59",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364537",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Many educators believe that the most effective means
                 of teaching is through one-on-one interactions with
                 students. It is not surprising, then, that an effective
                 way to teach programming is to give students immediate
                 feedback on programs that they have just written.
                 Unfortunately, such one-on-one teaching scenarios are
                 becoming increasingly difficult to arrange. We built
                 InSTEP, an online tutoring system for beginning C
                 programmers, to see whether an automated system could
                 provide effective immediate feedback to beginning
                 programming students. In an introductory programming
                 course, we compared two groups of students. One group
                 solved six programming problems with feedback from
                 InSTEP; the second group solved the same six problems
                 without feedback from InSTEP; both groups had access to
                 feedback from teaching assistants. While both groups of
                 students took about the same amount of time to complete
                 the problems and performed about the same on a
                 subsequent test, the students who received feedback
                 from InSTEP spent less than a third of the time asking
                 the teaching assistants questions than did the
                 others.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Diehl:2001:LE,
  author =       "Stephan Diehl and Andreas Kerren",
  title =        "Levels of exploration",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "60--64",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364538",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Visualization of computational models is at the heart
                 of educational software for computer science and
                 related fields. In this paper we look at how generation
                 of such visualizations and the visualization of the
                 generation process itself increase exploration. Four
                 approaches of increased exploration in formal language
                 theory and compiler design are introduced and for each
                 approach we discuss an educational system which
                 implements it.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Boroni:2001:ESA,
  author =       "Christopher M. Boroni and Frances W. Goosey and
                 Michael T. Grinder and Rockford J. Ross",
  title =        "Engaging students with active learning resources:
                 hypertextbooks for the {Web}",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "65--69",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364539",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Rossling:2001:AES,
  author =       "Guido R{\"o}{\ss}ling and Bernd Freisleben",
  title =        "{AnimalScript}: an extensible scripting language for
                 algorithm animation",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "70--74",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364541",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "In this paper, we present the AnimalScript
                 visualization language. This scripting language uses
                 the flexibility of the Animal system and provides many
                 additional new graphic primitives and animation effects
                 that go beyond the traditional Animal GUI features.
                 AnimalScript can easily be configured by changing the
                 content of a registration file. Users may also have
                 multiple registration files, as AnimalScript will
                 always use the first registration file it finds.
                 AnimalScript can easily be extended with additional
                 features without needing to read, let alone change, any
                 existing code.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Zimmerman:2001:WWC,
  author =       "Guy W. Zimmerman and Dena E. Eber",
  title =        "When worlds collide!: an interdisciplinary course in
                 virtual-reality art",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "75--79",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364545",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "The use of virtual reality technologies as a medium
                 for artistic expression requires the combined talents
                 of artists and computer scientists working in concert.
                 We created a course to bring together students and
                 faculty from these two diverse worlds, both to create
                 artistic virtual environments and to foster skills
                 needed to work on interdisciplinary teams. This paper
                 describes this course, the art works created and
                 discuses some of the issues that arise when such worlds
                 collide.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Marks:2001:TACb,
  author =       "Joe W. Marks and William T. Freeman and Henry H.
                 Leitner",
  editor =       "Henry MacKay Walker and Ren{\'e}e A. McCauley and
                 Judith L. Gersting and Ingrid Russell",
  title =        "Teaching Applied Computing without Programming: a
                 Case-Based Introductory Course for General Education",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  institution =  "Mitsubishi Electric Research Laboratories",
  pages =        "80--84",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/364447.364547",
  ISBN =         "1-58113-329-4",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-1-58113-329-5",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "DBLP;
                 http://dblp.uni-trier.de/db/conf/sigcse/sigcse2001.html#MarksFL01;
                 http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  note =         "''Teaching Applied Computing without Programming: A
                 Case-Based Introductory Course for General Education'',
                 ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education
                 (SIGCSE), ISBN: 1-58113-329-4, Vol 33, Issue 1, pages
                 80--84, February 2001, Proc ACM Press
                 (http://portal.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=364547\&coll=ACM\&dl=ACM\&CFID=3033011\&CFTOKEN=83234373),
                 Contact: Joe Marks (www.merl.com/people/marks/),
                 William Freeman (www.merl.com/people/freeman/)",
  URL =          "ftp://ftp.math.utah.edu/pub/mirrors/ftp.ira.uka.de/bibliography/Misc/DBLP/2001.bib;
                 ftp://ftp.math.utah.edu/pub/mirrors/ftp.ira.uka.de/bibliography/Techreports/MERL.bib",
  abstract =     "We introduce general-education students to key ideas
                 in applied computing through case studies from computer
                 graphics, computer animation, image processing,
                 computer vision, information retrieval, and artificial
                 intelligence. Each case study consists of two lectures:
                 one an intuitive exposition of relevant
                 computer-science concepts, and the other a hands-on
                 introduction to a working system that embodies these
                 concepts. Students use these systems to perform design
                 and problem-solving tasks, thereby reinforcing the
                 abstract concepts presented. Computer programming is
                 neither required nor taught. The course has been
                 offered for two years at the Harvard University
                 Extension School, and has achieved high ratings in
                 student surveys.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Adams:2001:TNO,
  author =       "D. Robert Adams and Carl Erickson",
  title =        "Teaching networking and operating systems to
                 information systems majors",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "85--89",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364548",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Teaching networking and operating systems to
                 information systems majors presents many challenges.
                 Operating systems and networking tend to be taught in
                 one of two ways. Either the material is non-technical,
                 directed more toward the business information systems
                 major, or the material is overly technical, equivalent
                 of teaching a traditional computer science course. We
                 have developed a model for teaching networking and
                 operating systems to information systems majors that
                 bridges that gap. The material is taught in the context
                 of network administration, a topic well-suited to
                 information systems majors. This paper describes our
                 model, the curriculum we use, and the experience of
                 students and faculty.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Bryant:2001:ICS,
  author =       "Randal E. Bryant and David R. O'Hallaron",
  title =        "Introducing computer systems from a programmer's
                 perspective",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "90--94",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364549",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "The course ``Introduction to Computer Systems'' at
                 Carnegie Mellon University presents the underlying
                 principles by which programs are executed on a
                 computer. It provides broad coverage of processor
                 operation, compilers, operating systems, and
                 networking. Whereas most systems courses present
                 material from the perspective of one who designs or
                 implements part of the system, our course presents the
                 view visible to application programmers. Students learn
                 that, by understanding aspects of the underlying
                 system, they can make their programs faster and more
                 reliable. This approach provides immediate benefits for
                 all computer science and engineering students and also
                 prepares them for more advanced systems courses. We
                 have taught our course for five semesters with
                 enthusiastic responses by the students, the
                 instructors, and the instructors of subsequent systems
                 courses.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Wolz:2001:TDP,
  author =       "Ursula Wolz",
  title =        "Teaching design and project management with {Lego RCX}
                 robots",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "95--99",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364551",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "In traditional CS 1 classes students may not develop
                 an appreciation for the planning process in software
                 development. Current IDEs provide such immediate
                 feedback that students can complete courses without an
                 appreciation for the need to plan in advance and design
                 thoughtfully. The course unit described here took time
                 out from a Java-based CS 1 course to give students
                 practical experience in programming a small robot in a
                 highly restricted setting. Outcomes are described in
                 detail. They are based on instructor's notes, and on
                 analysis of both videotaped student demonstrations and
                 student summative essays.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Reed:2001:RCJ,
  author =       "David Reed",
  title =        "Rethinking {CS0} with {JavaScript}",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "100--104",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364552",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Traditional approaches to CS0 have emphasized either
                 breadth, through an overview of computer science, or
                 depth, through intensive programming. This paper
                 describes an alternative teaching method that strikes a
                 balance between these two approaches through the use of
                 JavaScript and the World Wide Web. By taking advantage
                 of JavaScript's simplicity and natural Web-based
                 interfaces, the CS0 course described here is able to
                 maintain a strong emphasis on programming and
                 problem-solving, integrate programming skills with Web
                 technology, and still provide reasonable breadth on
                 general computer science topics. This balance between
                 depth and breadth makes the course attractive to both
                 non-majors and majors alike, providing a broad
                 perspective of the field as well as a foundation for
                 continuing studies in computer science.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Harlan:2001:KRK,
  author =       "Robert M. Harlan and David B. Levine and Shelley
                 McClarigan",
  title =        "The {Khepera} robot and the {kRobot} class: a platform
                 for introducing robotics in the undergraduate
                 curriculum",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "105--109",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364553",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "We discuss a class interface for the Khepera robot
                 that makes the robot an excellent platform for
                 undergraduate robotics courses and robot-based lab
                 exercises in other courses. The interface hides
                 low-level robot-computer communication and permits the
                 building of derived classes that encapsulate related
                 base behaviors relevant for higher-order tasks.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Merzbacher:2001:OAI,
  author =       "Matthew Merzbacher",
  title =        "Open artificial intelligence --- one course for all",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "110--113",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364554",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Upper-division courses contain some of the most
                 attractive topics in computer science, such as
                 artificial intelligence (AI). Unfortunately, layers of
                 prerequisites restrict AI to advanced computer science
                 students and a separate course for non-majors is not
                 always curricularly feasible. Instead, upper-division
                 AI can be taught in a way that has no prerequisites
                 while retaining the rigor of an upper-division course.
                 This paper includes the syllabus for such an ``open
                 AI'' course and discusses experiences, positive and
                 negative, with it.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Lankewicsz:2001:URG,
  author =       "Linda Bright Lankewicsz",
  title =        "Undergraduate research in genetic algorithms",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "114--118",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364556",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "The study of genetic algorithms (GAs) in the
                 undergraduate curriculum introduces students to
                 parallel search strategies and to experimental design.
                 Not only does it build on the topics covered in an
                 Analysis of Algorithms course but it exposes students
                 to issues such as the importance of the form of
                 representation to solving a problem and to the
                 difficulties encountered when a local minima is
                 selected as the solution rather than the best global
                 solution. As an illustration of the merits of including
                 genetic algorithms in the curriculum, an undergraduate
                 research project investigating the use of a diploid
                 sexual model for crossover operations is described.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Lowther:2001:CGU,
  author =       "John L. Lowther and Ching-Kuang Shene",
  title =        "Computing with geometry as an undergraduate course: a
                 three-year experience",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "119--123",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364558",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Hazzan:2001:THA,
  author =       "Orit Hazzan",
  title =        "Teaching the human aspect of software engineering ---
                 a case study",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "124--128",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364559",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "This paper describes a course I taught at the Technion
                 --- The Israel Institute of Technology --- which
                 addressed human aspects of Software Engineering. More
                 specifically, three human aspects involved in
                 developing software systems were the focus of the
                 course: problem solving methodologies in general and
                 their application in developing software systems in
                 particular; mental processes; and social processes of
                 software-system developers.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Goodrich:2001:TIA,
  author =       "Michael T. Goodrich and Roberto Tamassia",
  title =        "Teaching {Internet} algorithmics",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "129--133",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364561",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "We describe an Internet-based approach for teaching
                 important concepts in a Junior-Senior level course on
                 the design and analysis of data structures and
                 algorithms (traditionally called CS7 or DS\&A). The
                 main idea of this educational paradigm is twofold.
                 First, it provides fresh motivation for fundamental
                 algorithms and data structures that are finding new
                 applications in the context of the Internet. Second, it
                 provides a source for introducing new algorithms and
                 data structures that are derived from specific Internet
                 applications. In this paper, we suggest some key
                 pedagogical and curriculum updates that can be made to
                 the classic CS7/DS\&A course to turn it into a
                 course on Internet Algorithmics. We believe that such a
                 course will stimulate new interest and excitement in
                 material that is perceived by some students to be
                 stale, boring, and purely theoretical. We argue that
                 the foundational topics from CS7/DS\&A should
                 remain even when it is taught in an Internet-centric
                 manner. This, of course, should come as no surprise to
                 the seasoned computer scientist, who understands the
                 value of algorithmic thinking.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Redmond:2001:CPA,
  author =       "Michael A. Redmond",
  title =        "A computer program to aid assignment of student
                 project groups",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "134--138",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364562",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Group projects are a valuable part of the computer
                 science curriculum. Group work can be enhanced if
                 formation of groups is not via self-selection by the
                 students themselves. Students who are assigned to
                 groups are more likely to be exposed to other students
                 with different backgrounds and abilities from which
                 they can learn new things. However in a university with
                 students having a wide mix of schedules, a crucial
                 aspect of successful group formation is compatible
                 time-schedules within a group. This paper describes a
                 computer program designed to aid assignment to groups
                 while helping to ensure that groups have suitable
                 outside-of-class meeting times.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Gehringer:2001:EPR,
  author =       "Edward F. Gehringer",
  title =        "Electronic peer review and peer grading in
                 computer-science courses",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "139--143",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364564",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "We have implemented a peer-grading system for review
                 of student assignments over the World-Wide Web and used
                 it in approximately eight computer-science courses.
                 Students prepare their assignments and submit them to
                 our Peer Grader (PG) system. Other students are then
                 assigned to review and grade the assignments. The
                 system allows authors and reviewers to communicate with
                 authors being able to update their submissions. Unique
                 features of our approach include the ability to submit
                 arbitrary sets of Web pages for review, and mechanisms
                 for encouraging careful review of submissions. We have
                 used the system to produce high-quality compilations of
                 student work. Our assignment cycle consists of six
                 phases, from signing up for an assignment to Web
                 publishing of the final result. Based upon our
                 experience with PG, we offer suggestions for improving
                 the system to make it more easily usable by students at
                 all levels.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Phoha:2001:IDM,
  author =       "Vir V. Phoha",
  title =        "An interactive dynamic model for integrating knowledge
                 management methods and knowledge sharing technology in
                 a traditional classroom",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "144--148",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364567",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "This paper reports an interactive dynamic model using
                 Continuous Knowledge Management methods and Knowledge
                 Sharing technology to integrate the acquisition of
                 skills and relevant information (knowledge level) into
                 diverse, individualized, concurrent learning processes
                 in a traditional classroom setting. As opposed to a
                 passive introduction of technology to facilitate the
                 traditional learning processes a Web based active
                 learning and continuous evaluation process was created
                 which integrates objective scientific knowledge
                 relating to course content, subjective knowledge
                 obtained through personal interactions and empirical
                 knowledge collected during the learning process.
                 Knowledge Management, an emerging area of Artificial
                 Intelligence, encompasses identifying, mapping, and
                 managing intellectual assets to generate new knowledge
                 for competitive advantage and for sharing of
                 technology. The Web-based model of knowledge management
                 discussed here allows a diverse group of learners to
                 progressively interact and participate in the learning
                 process, providing non-threatening self-evaluation and
                 just-in-time individualized feedback to the learners
                 and efficient tracking and supervision tools to the
                 instructor. CS1003, a required general education class
                 provides an ideal application of this model as the
                 course draws from a diverse body of students ranging
                 from history to math majors and from freshmen to
                 seniors. The instructional design of this course using
                 the interactive dynamics of Knowledge Management
                 includes (i) provision of course archives and relevant
                 static information as a passive repository, (ii) Web
                 Discussion Forums, electronic chats and email
                 communication for active learning and continuous
                 interaction, (iii) an intelligent self-evaluation and
                 grade reporting system for non-threatening self-testing
                 and what-if analysis of performance, and (iv) a dynamic
                 student feedback system including individualized
                 supervision and anonymous feedback. Application of this
                 instructional process enhanced the goals of the course
                 from mere computer literacy to what the 1999 NRC Report
                 calls Fluency in Information Technology (FIT). Three
                 kinds of knowledge requirements are identified for FIT:
                 (1) Contemporary skills, (2) Foundational concepts, and
                 (3) Intellectual capabilities. This model is broadly
                 applicable to extend the benefits of traditional
                 classroom instruction to focus diverse intellectual
                 abilities and interests in a collaborative learning
                 process. Formal and informal evaluation support this
                 claim, demonstrating that the transition from purely
                 traditional teaching to a high degree of technology
                 fluency can be painless, efficient and effective in
                 preparing the students for a technology intensive
                 information age.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Estell:2001:IWB,
  author =       "John K. Estell",
  title =        "{IPP}: a {Web}-based interactive programming
                 portfolio",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "149--153",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364569",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "The portfolio is a well-established method for
                 documenting student learning outcomes. This paper
                 presents the development of a web-based interactive
                 programming portfolio methodology at our institution.
                 This methodology allows the reviewer to easily interact
                 with the computer program under review through the use
                 of Java applets. Both an evaluation form as well as
                 detailed rubrics for the evaluation of the portfolio
                 entry is accessible from the web page containing the
                 portfolio entry. These resources allow reviewers to
                 easily submit their feedback electronically to our
                 students.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Lischner:2001:ESL,
  author =       "Ray Lischner",
  title =        "Explorations: structured labs for first-time
                 programmers",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "154--158",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364571",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "A style of homework assignment is presented, called
                 explorations. An exploration is part of an introductory
                 programming course, specifically designed to help
                 first-time programmers overcome common hurdles, such as
                 misconceptions about the nature of computers and
                 programs. An exploration is a structured lab where the
                 student makes predictions about a program's behavior,
                 then runs the program to compare the actual result with
                 the predicted result. The questions are deliberately
                 designed to challenge common errors and preconceived
                 notions of computers and programming languages. Guided
                 questions help the students refine their mental models
                 of computers. Successful explorations have resulted in
                 significant gains in comprehension, retention, and
                 student satisfaction. Several guidelines are presented
                 to help teachers write effective explorations.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Chamillard:2001:ULP,
  author =       "A. T. Chamillard and Jay K. Joiner",
  title =        "Using lab practica to evaluate programming ability",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "159--163",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364572",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "One of the largest challenges facing educators
                 teaching courses with a significant programming
                 component is deciding how to evaluate each student's
                 programming ability. In this paper we discuss how we
                 have addressed this challenge in an introductory
                 computer science course and statistically analyze the
                 results to examine potential inequities in our
                 approach.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Robbins:2001:SCC,
  author =       "Kay A. Robbins and Catherine Sauls Key and Keith
                 Dickinson and John Montgomery",
  title =        "Solving the {CS1\slash CS2} lab dilemma: students as
                 presenters in {CS1\slash CS2} laboratories",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "164--168",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364575",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "In our quest to modernize our CS1/CS2 curriculum, we
                 ran into several problems in the effective delivery of
                 the courses and their associated laboratories. We have
                 developed a teaching model in which students become the
                 presenters for the hands-on laboratories. In order for
                 this approach to be effective, the laboratories must be
                 reused from semester to semester, so that student
                 presenters are truly knowledgeable. The
                 student-presenter model also requires more detailed
                 supporting material and a rethinking of course grading
                 policies.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Jipping:2001:UHC,
  author =       "Michael J. Jipping and Joshua Krikke and Sarah Dieter
                 and Samantha Sandro",
  title =        "Using handheld computers in the classroom:
                 laboratories and collaboration on handheld machines",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "169--173",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364578",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Handheld computers provide a unique opportunity for
                 teaching computer science. They are inexpensive (and
                 keep dropping in price); they are powerful; they are
                 accessible by students; and they run standard
                 programming interfaces. These facets combine to provide
                 a unique platform for teaching. This paper documents a
                 project to integrate handheld machines into the
                 classroom. We develop the case for using these
                 machines; we overview our plans to use them; and we
                 showcase two applications that we are using in classes.
                 These applications are available for download from the
                 Internet and represent a beginning for our project.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Applin:2001:SLA,
  author =       "Anne Gates Applin",
  title =        "Second language acquisition and {CS1}",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "174--178",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364579",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "This paper presents an empirical study of the relative
                 effectiveness of two teaching methods used in CS1
                 classrooms. While the teaching methods are nothing new,
                 the results of the study are an important contribution
                 to the body of computer science education literature.
                 The research design should also be of interest in that
                 it demonstrates how statistical significance can be
                 achieved with a relatively small sample by using the
                 naturally occurring groups that we have as course
                 sections. The teaching methods studied here were having
                 students write programming assignments from scratch
                 versus having them add to or modify existing
                 well-written, well-documented programs. The results are
                 perhaps not surprising. After controlling for certain
                 factors, the statistical analysis showed that students
                 who added to program templates as programming
                 assignments scored better on the comprehensive
                 examination and had higher overall course averages than
                 their counter parts who wrote programs from scratch.
                 This idea is firmly based in cognitive psychology and
                 teachers of language use a similar method extensively.
                 Reading increases vocabulary, aids in concept
                 retention, and improves writing skill.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Morrison:2001:SIS,
  author =       "Malcolm Morrison and Timothy S. Newman",
  title =        "A study of the impact of student background and
                 preparedness on outcomes in {CS I}",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "179--183",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364580",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "A study that assesses the significance of student
                 background characteristics on outcomes in a depth-first
                 CS I course is presented. The study was conducted over
                 a two-year period and involved more than 400 students
                 in fourteen different course sections taught by eight
                 different instructors in a CSAC-accredited program. In
                 this paper, focus is on the impact of prior programming
                 courses on CS I outcomes. In particular, the impact of
                 the prior course's programming language and provider is
                 reported.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Wilson:2001:CSI,
  author =       "Brenda Cantwell Wilson and Sharon Shrock",
  title =        "Contributing to success in an introductory computer
                 science course: a study of twelve factors",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "184--188",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364581",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "This study was conducted to determine factors that
                 promote success in an introductory college computer
                 science course. The model included twelve possible
                 predictive factors including math background,
                 attribution for success/failure (luck, effort,
                 difficulty of task, and ability), domain specific
                 self-efficacy, encouragement, comfort level in the
                 course, work style preference, previous programming
                 experience, previous non-programming computer
                 experience, and gender. Subjects included 105 students
                 enrolled in a CS1 introductory computer science course
                 at a midwestern university. The study revealed three
                 predictive factors in the following order of
                 importance: comfort level, math, and attribution to
                 luck for success/failure. Comfort level and math
                 background were found to have a positive influence on
                 success, whereas attribution to luck had a negative
                 influence. The study also revealed by considering the
                 different types of previous computer experiences
                 (including formal programming class, self-initiated
                 programming, internet use, game playing, and
                 productivity software use) that both a formal class in
                 programming and game playing were predictive of
                 success. Formal training had a positive influence and
                 games a negative influence on class grade.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Fleury:2001:ERV,
  author =       "Ann E. Fleury",
  title =        "Encapsulation and reuse as viewed by {Java} students",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "189--193",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364582",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Through audio-taped student interviews, this study
                 examined beginning Java students' conceptions of
                 object-oriented programming. Students rated programs on
                 stylistic criteria including ease of comprehension,
                 ease of debugging, ease of modification, ease of reuse,
                 and overall quality of design. They also explained the
                 reasons for their ratings. The results will be
                 discussed and interpreted in light of previous
                 research. Implications for instruction will also be
                 examined.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Bredlau:2001:ALT,
  author =       "Carl Bredlau and Dorothy Deremer",
  title =        "Assembly language through the {Java Virtual Machine}",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "194--198",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364583",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/virtual-machines.bib",
  abstract =     "Student understanding of choices and design decisions
                 about instruction formats, addressing, instruction
                 types, and flow of control is developed through the
                 assembly level. We propose the Java Virtual Machine
                 (JVM) as the architecture for teaching assembly
                 language. The paper describes how to use the JVM as a
                 teaching tool for a sophomore level Assembly Language
                 and Computer Architecture course.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Maj:2001:PNH,
  author =       "S. P. Maj and D. Veal and R. Duley",
  title =        "A proposed new high level abstraction for computer
                 technology",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "199--203",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364584",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Computer technology can be described using a range of
                 models based on different levels of detail e.g.,
                 semiconductors, transistors, digital circuits. Such
                 models are designed to progressively hid irrelevant
                 detail and yet provide sufficient information to be
                 useful for communication, design and documentation.
                 However, developments in computer technology have
                 resulted in a low cost, heterogeneous modular
                 architecture that is difficult to model using current
                 methods. This paper proposes a new generic method of
                 modeling computer technology at a higher level of
                 abstraction than those currently used. Investigations
                 to date indicate that this model is independent of
                 architectural detail and can therefore accommodate
                 changes in technology. This new model is more directly
                 relevant to the cheap, low-cost modular architectures
                 in use today. Furthermore, all work to date has
                 strongly indicated it may be useful as the basis of a
                 new pedagogical framework for teaching not only
                 introductory but also more advanced computer
                 technology.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Yurcik:2001:WBL,
  author =       "William Yurcik and Larry Brumbaugh",
  title =        "A {Web}-based {Little Man Computer} simulator",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "204--208",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364585",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "This paper describes a web-based simulation tool which
                 can be used to teach introductory computer organization
                 based on the conceptual paradigm of a Little Man
                 Computer. Specifically we share examples how this tool
                 can be used to improve student comprehension of the
                 interaction between computer architecture, assembly
                 language, and the operating system.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Harms:2001:UPT,
  author =       "Douglas Harms and Dave Berque",
  title =        "Using a {PDP-11\slash 10} to teach content and history
                 in computer organization courses",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "209--213",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364586",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "This paper describes our use of a 1970's era PDP-11/10
                 to support an hour long module which we have
                 incorporated into our computer organization course for
                 the past few semesters. The module is designed to
                 reinforce standard concepts such as number systems and
                 two-pass assemblers while at the same time exposing the
                 students to some historical issues. After providing
                 some background information about the PDP-11/10 we
                 explain the motivation for our approach. Then we
                 describe a fifteen minute instructional video which we
                 have produced on the topic of developing programs on
                 the PDP/11-10. The video is available from the authors
                 either on VHS tape or as a QuickTime file, thereby
                 allowing instructors at other schools to try our
                 approach by showing the video to their students.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Barnes:2001:TTI,
  author =       "Julie Barnes and Laura Leventhal",
  title =        "{Turing} the tables: introducing software engineering
                 concepts in a user interface design course",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "214--218",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364587",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "The most recent report of the Computing Curricula 2001
                 (CC2001) suggests that updated curricula must reflect
                 the broadening nature of our discipline. Two areas that
                 are included in the strawman draft of CC2001 are
                 software engineering (SE) and human-computer
                 interaction (HC). While the first inclination might be
                 to incorporate these minimal HC concepts in a
                 traditional SE course, we propose a different approach.
                 This paper outlines a project oriented HC course in
                 which we are able to emphasize SE in the context of HC
                 concepts. We include an overview of course content that
                 illustrates our approach.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Guzdial:2001:UST,
  author =       "Mark Guzdial",
  title =        "Using squeak for teaching user interface software",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "219--223",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364588",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Squeak is a new programming language that is
                 particularly appropriate for learning computer science.
                 It offers an excellent infrastructure for interesting
                 projects (e.g., multimedia, Web browsing and serving),
                 and all source code is included (and written in Squeak)
                 from the virtual machine, windowing, on up. Squeak is
                 being used in a course on Objects and Design (focusing
                 on the development of user interfaces), both to enhance
                 the infrastructure for a course on, and to change how
                 user interfaces are taught. Rather than teach a
                 toolkit, the focus is now on teaching students how to
                 build toolkits. This paper presents a pilot study
                 suggesting benefits of our new approach.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Pollock:2001:MPP,
  author =       "Lori Pollock and Mike Jochen",
  title =        "Making parallel programming accessible to
                 inexperienced programmers through cooperative
                 learning",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "224--228",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364589",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "This paper describes how we utilized cooperative
                 learning to meet the practical challenges of teaching
                 parallel programming in the early college years, as
                 well as to provide a more real world context to the
                 course. Our main contribution is a set of cooperative
                 group activities for both inside and outside the
                 classroom, which are targeted to the computer science
                 discipline, have received very positive student
                 feedback, are easy to implement, and achieve a number
                 of learning objectives beyond knowledge of the specific
                 topic. These activities can be applied directly or be
                 easily adapted to other computer science courses,
                 particularly programming, systems, and experimental
                 computer science courses.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Hartley:2001:AGM,
  author =       "Stephen J. Hartley",
  title =        "``Alfonse, give me a call!''",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "229--232",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364590",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "The SR programming language supports a simple and
                 elegant set of abstractions for its model of
                 distributed computing. The model provides an effective
                 framework for demonstrating to students the different
                 styles of distributed programming. A small Java toolkit
                 based on SR's model is presented in this paper. This
                 toolkit allows instructors to use the popular Java
                 language as a platform in parallel and distributed
                 processing courses.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Docherty:2001:IDS,
  author =       "Michael Docherty and Peter Sutton and Margot Brereton
                 and Simon Kaplan",
  title =        "An innovative design and studio-based {CS} degree",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "233--237",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364591",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "The University of Queensland has recently established
                 a new design-focused, studio-based computer science
                 degree. The Bachelor of Information Environments degree
                 augments the core courses from the University's
                 standard CS degree with a stream of design courses and
                 integrative studio-based projects undertaken every
                 semester. The studio projects integrate and reinforce
                 learning by requiring students to apply the knowledge
                 and skills gained in other courses to open-ended
                 real-world design projects. The studio model is based
                 on the architectural studio and involves teamwork,
                 collaborative learning, interactive problem solving,
                 presentations and peer review. This paper describes the
                 degree program, its curriculum and rationale, and
                 reports on experiences in the first year of delivery.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Golshani:2001:CCI,
  author =       "F. Golshani and S. Panchanathan and O. Friesen and Y.
                 C. Park and J. J. Song",
  title =        "A comprehensive curriculum for {IT} education and
                 workforce development: an engineering approach",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "238--242",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364592",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Noting the shortage of IT professionals nationally
                 [1], we propose a comprehensive curriculum that
                 supports a variety of programs geared to all ages from
                 early school years to retirement and beyond. Current IT
                 workforce development efforts are limited to training,
                 and have not as yet focused on education and
                 professional development. Largely, this is due to a
                 lack of a science underpinning for IT related
                 curricula. Without such a unified science component, a
                 structured organization of information related concepts
                 cannot be derived. Our proposal includes the
                 development of a number of programs addressing the
                 needs of a variety of learners ranging from elementary
                 school through college and beyond. Seven programs, each
                 with a specific emphasis for various groups, are being
                 developed. Such essential issues as industrial-academic
                 liaisons, workforce (re)training, promotional and
                 awareness programs, teacher training, and IT
                 professional role redefinition, are integral pieces of
                 this project. All developments will be firmly founded
                 on the scientific framework of information science and
                 engineering [2].This work is supported by NSF grant
                 DUE-9950168.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Tucker:2001:OCB,
  author =       "Allen B. Tucker and Charles F. Kelemen and Kim B.
                 Bruce",
  title =        "Our curriculum has become math-phobic!",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "243--247",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364593",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "The paper [2] argued that mathematical ideas play an
                 important role in the computer science curriculum, and
                 that Discrete Mathematics needs to be taught early in
                 the computer science curriculum. In this follow-up
                 paper, we present evidence that computer science
                 curricula are drifting away from a fundamental
                 commitment to theoretical and mathematical ideas. We
                 propose some actions that can be taken to help reverse
                 this drift.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{King:2001:WCM,
  author =       "L. A. Smith King and John Barr and Ben Coleman",
  title =        "What could be more {SLic?}: projects for the
                 programming languages course",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "248--252",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364594",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "The last few years has seen renewed interest in
                 teaching programming-in-the-large (PIL) and
                 programming-in-context of a larger existing program
                 (PIC) throughout the computer science curriculum.
                 Although these skills have been a focus of software
                 engineering courses and capstone projects, there is an
                 emphasis to teach these skills in other courses across
                 the curriculum. This paper addresses incorporation of
                 PIL and PIC in the programming language course, and
                 presents specific PIC and PIL projects using an
                 interpreter for SLic, a simple logic (declarative)
                 language. SLic itself is part of a family of
                 interpreters in MuLE, a software environment designed
                 to support interpreter-based projects in the
                 programming languages course. MuLE is written in
                 DrScheme (from Rice's PLT software project distributed
                 under the GNU Library General Public License) and runs
                 under Windows 95/98/NT/2000, MacOS, and Unix/X.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Wick:2001:RAC,
  author =       "Michael R. Wick and Daniel E. Stevenson",
  title =        "A reductionist approach to a course on programming
                 languages",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "253--257",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364595",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "The Programming Languages course is often a critical
                 turning point in an undergraduate education where
                 students begin to think more abstractly about
                 programming languages and the design paradigms that use
                 them. Traditional approaches to presenting this
                 material often fail to achieve a number of important
                 goals. We present an approach to Programming Languages
                 that uses a single demonstration language (Scheme) and
                 a collection of fundamental building blocks to study a
                 variety of programming paradigms.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Wick:2001:KUD,
  author =       "Michael R. Wick",
  title =        "{Kaleidoscope}: using design patterns in {CS1}",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "258--262",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364596",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Most computer science curricula include design
                 patterns during the junior/senior software development
                 sequence. We present a simplified application of two
                 classic design patterns that is specifically targeted
                 at students in their first programming course. We also
                 include suggested pedagogy on how to develop the
                 concepts necessary to implement and appreciate the
                 application.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Nguyen:2001:DPS,
  author =       "Dung (`Zung') Nguyen and Stephen B. Wong",
  title =        "Design patterns for sorting",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "263--267",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364597",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Drawing on Merritt's divide-and-conquer sorting
                 taxonomy [1], we model comparison-based sorting as an
                 abstract class with a template method to perform the
                 sort by relegating the splitting and joining of arrays
                 to its concrete subclasses. Comparison on objects is
                 carried out via an abstract ordering strategy. This
                 reduces code complexity and simplifies the analyses of
                 the various concrete sorting algorithms. Performance
                 measurements and visualizations can be added without
                 modifying any code by utilizing the decorator design
                 pattern. This object-oriented design not only provides
                 the student a concrete way of unifying seemingly
                 disparate sorting algorithms but also help him/her
                 differentiate them at the proper level of
                 abstraction.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Gegg-Harrison:2001:AEN,
  author =       "Timothy S. Gegg-Harrison",
  title =        "Ancient {Egyptian} numbers: a {CS}-complete example",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "268--272",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364598",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "A critical piece of any successful curriculum is a
                 robust example that permeates the key concepts of the
                 field. For computer science, we refer to such an
                 example as CS-complete. A good CS-complete example is
                 applicable in CS1, CS2, and Discrete Mathematics.
                 Approximately 4000 years ago, the ancient Egyptians
                 used a numbering system that serves as a prototype
                 CS-complete example. In this paper, we outline the use
                 of Egyptian numbering system as an example that
                 naturally extends through CS1, CS2, and Discrete
                 Mathematics.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Herzog:2001:RTL,
  author =       "Erik Herzog and Peter Loborg and Simin Nadjm-Tehrani",
  title =        "Real-time lab exercises: a teacher's dilemma",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "273--277",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364600",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "This paper describes our design of real-time systems
                 laboratories in an integrated theme of study which
                 includes automatic control. The theme appears at the
                 end of the third year of a 4,5 year master of
                 engineering programme, which adopts Problem-Based
                 Learning (PBL) as a main pedagogical method. We
                 describe the rationale behind our choice of application
                 area, the lab environment, and the operating system
                 used. The paper concludes by giving some qualitative
                 evaluations as well as some quantitative measures based
                 on limited data.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Clifton:2001:CSA,
  author =       "Joseph M. Clifton",
  title =        "A {CS\slash SE} approach to a real-time embedded
                 systems software development course",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "278--281",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364601",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "This paper describes an approach to a course in
                 real-time embedded systems that focuses on software
                 development issues. The course attempts to integrate
                 topics from traditional computer science, infuse
                 software engineering principles, and give some exposure
                 to hardware concerns. Another important component of
                 the course is experience with developing software for
                 multiple platforms.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Bergin:2001:PLI,
  author =       "Joseph Bergin",
  title =        "A pattern language for initial course design",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "282--286",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364602",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Pollock:2001:IIE,
  author =       "Lori Pollock",
  title =        "Integrating an intensive experience with communication
                 skills development into a computer science course",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "287--291",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364603",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "This paper describes how a technical computer science
                 course was transformed into an intensive communication
                 skills course without sacrificing the technical content
                 of the course. By integrating this experience into
                 existing technical courses, the acquired skills are
                 specific to the CS context without requiring an
                 additional course. The main contribution of this paper
                 is a set of activities which are targeted to building
                 communications skills required for successful research
                 in computer science at any level, but also generally
                 useful for computer science students entering careers
                 not involving basic research. We describe the specific
                 methods and tools implemented in a way to provide
                 considerable support, guidance, and feedback to
                 students without a large investment by the professor.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Lister:2001:OOA,
  author =       "Raymond Lister",
  title =        "Objectives and objective assessment in {CS1}",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "292--296",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364605",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "When designing a first semester ``CS1'' programming
                 subject, I advocate ``truth in sentencing''. That is,
                 the objectives should be explicit, and the assessment
                 tasks should reflect the objectives. This may appear to
                 be a statement of the obvious, but few subjects satisfy
                 these criteria. The traditional CS1 approach is to set
                 students the task of writing extensive code, as early
                 as possible. On closer inspection of such subjects, one
                 finds marking schemes for exams and assignments that
                 are generous to the point of being inconsistent with
                 the subject objectives. Instead, students should not
                 write any original code in CS1, and should be examined
                 by multiple choice question.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Rasala:2001:JPT,
  author =       "Richard Rasala and Jeff Raab and Viera K. Proulx",
  title =        "{Java} power tools: model software for teaching
                 object-oriented design",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "297--301",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364606",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "The Java Power Tools or JPT is a Java toolkit designed
                 to enable students to rapidly develop graphical user
                 interfaces in freshman computer science programming
                 projects. Because it is simple to create GUIs using
                 JPT, students can focus on the more fundamental issues
                 of computer science rather than on widget management.
                 In a separate article[4], we will discuss with examples
                 how the JPT can help freshman students to learn about
                 the basics of algorithms, data structures, classes, and
                 interface design. In this article, we will focus on how
                 the JPT itself can be used as an extended case study of
                 object-oriented design principles in a more advanced
                 course. The fundamental design principles of the JPT
                 are that the elements of a graphical user interface
                 should be able to be combined recursively as nested
                 views and that the communication between these views
                 and the internal data models should be as automatic as
                 possible. In particular, in JPT, the totality of user
                 input from a complex view can be easily converted into
                 a corresponding data model and any input errors will be
                 detected and corrected along the way. This ease of
                 communication is achieved by using string objects as a
                 lingua franca for views and models and by using parsing
                 when appropriate to automatically check for errors and
                 trigger recovery. The JPT achieves its power by a
                 combination of computer science and software design
                 principles. Recursion, abstraction, and encapsulation
                 are systematically used to create GUI tools of great
                 flexibility. It should be noted that a much simpler
                 pedagogical package for Java IO was recently presented
                 in [9].",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Astrachan:2001:OOW,
  author =       "Owen Astrachan",
  title =        "{OO} overkill: when simple is better than not",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "302--306",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364608",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Object oriented design patterns as popularized in
                 [GHJV95] are intended to solve common programming
                 problems and to assist the programmer in designing and
                 developing robust systems. As first year courses
                 increasingly emphasize object orientation, knowledge of
                 design patterns and when to use them becomes an
                 important component of the first year curriculum.
                 Recent literature has focused on introducing the
                 patterns to computer science educators, but not on the
                 situations and contexts in which the patterns are
                 appropriate. Design patterns and object orientation are
                 parts of a methodology that scales to large systems. In
                 this paper we show that these concepts do not always
                 scale down. We analyze examples from current literature
                 that would be simpler without patterns, and provide
                 examples of when the same design patterns do make
                 design and programs simpler.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Morelli:2001:JAH,
  author =       "Ralph Morelli and Ralph Walde and Gregg Marcuccio",
  title =        "A {Java API} for historical ciphers: an
                 object-oriented design project",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "307--311",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364609",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "This paper describes a project suitable for a software
                 engineering or object-oriented design course. The
                 project consists of asking students to design an
                 application programming interface (API) for a
                 particular range of applications. An API-design project
                 has several features not always found in
                 application-design projects: It forces students to
                 focus carefully on the distinction between the
                 programming and the user interfaces; it provides a good
                 justification for studying existing APIs as model code;
                 it provides a natural way to divide tasks between
                 different groups of designers/programmers; and, the
                 final product can be used as the basis for programming
                 projects in other courses. In this case the particular
                 project we describe is the design of an API for
                 implementing Historical Cipher algorithms.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Nicholas:2001:TED,
  author =       "Tyrone Nicholas and Jerzy A. Barchanski",
  title =        "{TOS}: an educational distributed operating system in
                 {Java}",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "312--316",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364611",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "This paper describes TOS --- an educational
                 distributed operating system implemented in Java. First
                 the current trends in commercial operating systems are
                 shortly presented and compared with several available
                 educational operating systems. Next we give our
                 rationals to use Java as the TOS implementation
                 language. Then the architecture of the system and its
                 components --- launchers and servers are described.
                 Finally we explain the advantages of this architecture
                 and give some examples of possible student projects and
                 assignments.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Robbins:2001:SPE,
  author =       "Steven Robbins",
  title =        "Starving philosophers: experimentation with monitor
                 synchronization",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "317--321",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364612",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Textbook discussions of synchronization seldom go
                 beyond a brief introduction in terms of classical
                 problems. This paper presents a simulator for the
                 monitor solution of the dining philosophers problem
                 that students can use to experimentally explore how
                 such a solution might behave in practice. The
                 simulator, which can be run remotely from a browser or
                 can be downloaded for running locally, is written in
                 Java so that it can be run on almost any system.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Donaldson:2001:ADO,
  author =       "John L. Donaldson",
  title =        "Architecture-dependent operating system project
                 sequence",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "322--326",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364613",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Developing hands-on programming projects for a course
                 on operating systems is a challenge. A wide variety of
                 methods have been used and reported on at past SIGCSE
                 meetings. A good summary of some of these projects can
                 be found in [5]. One approach is to build a rudimentary
                 operating system kernel from the bottom up. This
                 approach necessarily involves some
                 architecture-dependent coding. In this paper, the
                 author describes his experience with such a project
                 sequence based on the Intel protected mode
                 architecture.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Williams:2001:SSP,
  author =       "Laurie Williams and Richard L. Upchurch",
  title =        "In support of student pair-programming",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "327--331",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364614",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Industry, particularly those following the eXtreme
                 Programming (XP) methodology [2], has popularized the
                 use of pair-programming. The pair-programming model has
                 also been found to be beneficial for student
                 programmers. Initial quantitative and qualitative
                 results, which will be discussed in this paper,
                 demonstrate that the use of pair-programming in the
                 computer science classroom enhances student learning
                 and satisfaction and reduces the frustration common
                 among students. Additionally, the use of
                 pair-programming relieves the burden on the educators
                 because students no longer view the teaching staff as
                 their sole form of technical information. We explore
                 the nature of pair-programming, then examine the ways
                 such a practice may enhance teaching and learning in
                 computer science education.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Parrish:2001:BSC,
  author =       "Allen Parrish and Brandon Dixon and David Cordes",
  title =        "Binary software components in the undergraduate
                 computer science curriculum",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "332--336",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364615",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "At one time, commercial software applications were
                 released as single binary executable files. Discussions
                 of the notion of a ``software component'' were almost
                 always limited to the context of source code. However,
                 with the proliferation of numerous new technologies,
                 applications are now more typically released as
                 collections of cooperating binary components. While
                 there is significant industrial emphasis on binary
                 component technologies, computer science curricula have
                 not yet standardized upon a corpus of fundamentally
                 sound concepts to support education within this
                 paradigm. In this paper, we describe our efforts to
                 define a fundamental core set of concepts to support
                 this important programming paradigm, as well as our
                 efforts to integrate these concepts into a typical
                 undergraduate computer science curriculum.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Jones:2001:ITC,
  author =       "Edward L. Jones",
  title =        "Integrating testing into the curriculum --- arsenic in
                 small doses",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "337--341",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364617",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Testing accounts for 50\% of the cost of software, yet
                 it receives little treatment in most curricula. This
                 paper presents some approaches to giving all students
                 multiple, incremental exposures to software testing
                 throughout the curriculum. A unifying framework is
                 presented which identifies a minimal set of test
                 experiences, skills and concepts students should
                 accumulate. The integrated approach combines common
                 test experiences in core courses, an elective course in
                 software testing, and volunteer participation in a test
                 laboratory.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Preston:2001:OCL,
  author =       "Jon A. Preston and Laura Wilson",
  title =        "Offering {CS1} on-line reducing campus resource demand
                 while improving the learning environment",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "342--346",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364618",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Multimedia-rich Web interfaces offer an increasingly
                 attractive option for teaching distance and large-scale
                 courses. We explore our experience of publishing CS1 to
                 over 200 students and the resulting student
                 performance. Our approach included streaming QuickTime
                 audio and video synchronized with animated PowerPoint
                 slides; in addition, a ``Frequently Asked Questions''
                 (FAQ) list was compiled from previous students'
                 questions and made available. We demonstrate that the
                 on-line lecture material enhanced students' learning of
                 those enrolled in the traditional, lecture-based
                 sections and those enrolled in the on-line section. The
                 process is cost-effective, scalable, and affords use in
                 other disciplines beyond CS1. Our future research is
                 also discussed.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Anderson:2001:ETV,
  author =       "Richard Anderson and Martin Dickey and Hal Perkins",
  title =        "Experiences with tutored video instruction for
                 introductory programming courses",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "347--351",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364619",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "In this paper we describe our experiences of exporting
                 our introductory programming courses to community
                 colleges. We used Tutored Video Instruction (TVI) as
                 the mode of instruction where recorded versions of our
                 lectures were shown to groups of students with local
                 instructors periodically stopping the lecture for
                 questions and discussion. We have offered a total of 16
                 sections of TVI courses, 11 were of our first quarter
                 programming course (CSE142), and 5 were of our second
                 quarter programming course (CSE 143). The courses were
                 offered at seven institutions. Approximately 180
                 students completed the courses. We identify factors
                 which contributed positively and negatively to the use
                 of TVI for introductory programming courses. The two
                 most important changes to our TVI program based on
                 these experiences will the use of studio produced
                 lectures and the abandonment of centralized course
                 administration.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Brown:2001:DBO,
  author =       "Judy Brown and Jiayun Lu",
  title =        "Designing better online teaching material",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "352--356",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364621",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "The creation of excellent online teaching material is
                 challenging because it requires that designers are able
                 to apply learning theories and usability principles. In
                 this paper we describe a web-based tutorial we
                 developed to teach database students about SQL-like
                 operators that can be used to access data in data
                 warehouses (very large collections of data used by
                 analysts). This paper describes the processes and
                 methods used to develop the tutorial and the techniques
                 we used to test prototypes of our tutorial. We show how
                 ideas from user-centered design and learning theory can
                 be usefully combined to create a new process for
                 developing online teaching material that meets learning
                 and usability aims.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Urban:2001:ADC,
  author =       "Susan D. Urban and Suzanne W. Dietrich",
  title =        "Advanced database concepts for undergraduates:
                 experience with teaching a second course",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "357--361",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364648",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "This paper describes the development of a second
                 database course for undergraduates, preparing students
                 for the advanced database concepts they will experience
                 in industry. Assuming an introductory course on
                 relational database systems as a prerequisite, the
                 topics addressed in the course include object-oriented
                 data modeling, object-oriented database systems,
                 object-relational database systems, Web access to
                 databases, and professionalism and ethics. We present
                 our experience with teaching the course, elaborating on
                 the topics and assignments. We also present feedback
                 from students and industry partners as well as our own
                 assessment of future course refinements.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Dietrich:2001:RGU,
  author =       "Suzanne W. Dietrich and Dan Suceava and Chakrapani
                 Cherukuri and Susan D. Urban",
  title =        "A reusable graphical user interface for manipulating
                 object-oriented databases using {Java} and {XML}",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "362--366",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364712",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "This paper describes the design and functionality of a
                 graphical user interface (GUI) written in Java Swing
                 that is used to support instructional activities
                 associated with teaching object-oriented database
                 (OODB) concepts. The GUI supports the manipulation of
                 objects in an OODB, assuming the implementation of a
                 specified interface for interacting with an OODB. By
                 using the interface, students can focus on
                 object-oriented design and programming concepts
                 associated with OODB concepts rather than the
                 development of a user interface. Since the GUI uses the
                 Extensible Markup Language (XML) for defining the
                 database schema and data import/export, the use of the
                 GUI provides the added benefit of demonstrating the
                 manner in which XML interacts with database
                 technology.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Wang:2001:IOR,
  author =       "Ming Wang",
  title =        "Implementation of object-relational {DBMSs} in a
                 relational database course",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "367--370",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364715",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Object-relational DBMS was gradually added as a new
                 topic to the author's database course in response to
                 the rapid changes in DBMS technology in the real world.
                 Implementation of ORDBMS technology in a traditional
                 relational database course had significant impacts on
                 the database curriculum. As an outcome, students were
                 able to solve problems that could not be solved well in
                 a relational database. ORDBMS was implemented with
                 Universal Modeling Language (UML) and the Oracle 8i
                 server. Course design, teaching methodology, class
                 activities and the outcome of the course are
                 discussed.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Montante:2001:SCP,
  author =       "Robert Montante and Zahira Khan",
  title =        "Specialized certification programs in computer
                 science",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "371--375",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364749",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Harmeyer:2001:PSI,
  author =       "Kathleen Harmeyer and Donna Tupper and William Beck
                 and Sylvia Sorkin",
  title =        "Preparing students for {Internet} and multimedia
                 technology careers",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "376--380",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364750",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "This paper provides descriptions of three courses in a
                 thirty-credit Internet and Multimedia Technology
                 (I/MMT) certificate program. They are: Multimedia
                 Authoring II, Project Development, and Internet
                 Programming. The latter has been offered in both
                 traditional and online versions at the Essex Campus of
                 the Community College of Baltimore County
                 (CCBC-Essex).",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Veal:2001:AHS,
  author =       "D. Veal and S. P. Maj and Rick Duley",
  title =        "Assessing ``hands on'' skills on {CS1} computer \&
                 network technology units",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "381--385",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364751",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Edith Cowan University (ECU) introduced a new
                 curriculum in computer and network technology based
                 upon a market analysis of employer expectations.
                 Uniquely, within Australia, this curriculum has
                 extensive workshop exercises that require students to
                 work on equipment they are likely to meet in the
                 workplace and as such the workshop environment is
                 potentially hazardous to students. It was found that
                 prospective employers often required both an assessment
                 and an assurance that students following this
                 curriculum could work to an acceptable industry
                 standard. The traditional forms of assessment
                 (examinations and assignments) did not fulfill this
                 requirement. The authors therefore designed a
                 Competency-Based Assessment (CBA) to measure procedural
                 knowledge and skills. The CBA designed was simple, easy
                 to use and can be implemented as part of a standard
                 workshop without interrupting student activities.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Pfleeger:2001:IEW,
  author =       "Shari Lawrence Pfleeger and Pat Teller and Sheila E.
                 Castaneda and Manda Wilson and Rowan Lindley",
  title =        "Increasing the enrollment of women in computer
                 science",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "386--387",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364752",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Stasko:2001:MAC,
  author =       "John Stasko and Mark Guzdial and Mike Clancy and Nell
                 Dale and Sally Fincher",
  title =        "Models and areas for {CS} education research",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "388--389",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364753",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "We hope to alert attendees of this panel to a number
                 of aspects of CS education research: $ \bullet $
                 previous work that provides good models for future
                 research; $ \bullet $ current projects and results; $
                 \bullet $ areas that deserve more inquiry; $ \bullet $
                 questions for which research is unlikely at the moment
                 to yield useful information. The panel is aimed at
                 people who don't need to be convinced about the value
                 of CS education research, but who perhaps are
                 unfamiliar with what's happening or how they might get
                 involved themselves.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Gries:2001:HMT,
  author =       "David Gries and Bill Marion and Peter Henderson and
                 Diane Schwartz",
  title =        "How mathematical thinking enhances computer science
                 problem solving",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "390--391",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364754",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "There are deep connections between algorithmic and
                 mathematical thinking. Both construct ``systems'' ---
                 computing systems in the algorithmic case, intellectual
                 ones in mathematics --- from simple primitives. As
                 Knuth notes in the preface to The Art of Computer
                 Programming, ``The construction of a computer program
                 from a set of basic instructions is very similar to the
                 construction of a mathematical proof from a set of
                 axioms'' [1]. Other connections include similar ways of
                 organizing primitives into larger structures (e.g.,
                 recursion in algorithms, recursion and induction in
                 math; conditionals in algorithms, definition in cases
                 and proof by cases in math), similar ways of using
                 abstraction to manage complexity, and an underlying
                 reliance on logic. In short, mathematics is not merely
                 a tool for limited areas of computer science, it is a
                 mindset that fundamentally improves one's ability to
                 devise and implement algorithms. Computer science
                 students therefore need to exercise their mathematical
                 as well as their computational abilities, and computer
                 science educators need to help students use both ways
                 of thinking to solve computing problems. This panel
                 illustrates specific ways in which mathematical
                 reasoning enhances algorithmic problem solving, and
                 provides educators with concrete examples and resources
                 to use in their own teaching. Each panelist will
                 present an exercise, classroom example, or similar
                 item, from their own experience, and will demonstrate
                 ways in which mathematical reasoning helps one solve
                 and/or understand it. The audience will be invited to
                 contribute their own examples and to comment further on
                 the role of mathematical thinking in computer science
                 problem solving. The panelists' and audience members'
                 examples will be collected on a Web page for continuing
                 reference. A prototype of this page is at
                 http://www.cs.geneseo.edu/~baldwin/math-thinking/examples.html.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Davies:2001:QDE,
  author =       "Gordon Davies and Wendy Doube and Wendy
                 Lawrence-Fowler and Dale Shaffer",
  title =        "Quality in distance education",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "392--393",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364755",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Parrish:2001:IAV,
  author =       "Allen Parrish and Joe Hollingsworth and Peter Maurer
                 and Benjamin Shults and Bruce Weide",
  title =        "Identifying an appropriate view of software components
                 for undergraduate education",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "394--395",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364756",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Software components have existed in one form or
                 another for a number of years. Work in this area can be
                 classified into two broad categories. On the one hand,
                 a number of researchers have approached the concept of
                 software components from a first principles
                 perspective, advancing ideas regarding what constitutes
                 the ideal component paradigm from perspectives of
                 efficiency, verifiability and reusability. On the other
                 hand, recent commercial advances in a number of popular
                 technologies have elevated the software component
                 concept into widespread use within the software
                 practitioner community. Such technologies include a
                 number of technologies made popular by Microsoft (such
                 as Active-X, COM, DCOM and Visual Basic), as well as
                 CORBA and Java Beans. Neither of these perspectives on
                 software components has become a standard cornerstone
                 of software development pedagogy. Yet both perspectives
                 may have an important role in preparing software
                 developers to build high-quality software in the
                 context of modern software development technologies. In
                 particular, teaching students how to design and
                 construct software components from first principles
                 provides students with important guidance as to the
                 ``right way'' to structure correct and efficient
                 software systems (i.e., with emphasis on ``what''
                 component-based systems should contain). On the other
                 hand, teaching students about current commercial
                 component technologies exposes students to the
                 important dimension of best commercial practice (i.e.,
                 with emphasis on ``how'' component-based systems could
                 be built).The participants of this panel are all
                 actively involved in the development of courses and
                 curricula that provide various perspectives on
                 component-based systems. They represent both the first
                 principles and commercial perspectives discussed above.
                 Position statements for each of the panelists appear
                 below.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Owens:2001:UPA,
  author =       "Barbara Boucher Owens and Fran Hunt and Stuart Reges
                 and Cary Laxer",
  title =        "The university perspective: awarding credit for
                 advanced placement {(AP)} in computer science",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "396--397",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364757",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "This panel discusses the granting of credit for AP CS
                 by colleges and universities. Particularly with the
                 change of the AP CS exam from Pascal to C++ last year,
                 this panel is aimed both the collegiate and high school
                 communities who are interested in comments from schools
                 who have experience with AP CS students. Topics will
                 include a short review of the AP curriculum, and some
                 examples of what credit is given, how AP CS students
                 are placed, and how the students perform in those and
                 subsequent courses.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Rebelsky:2001:WDD,
  author =       "Samuel A. Rebelsky and Peter B. Henderson and Amruth
                 N. Kumar and F. N. (Fred) Springsteel",
  title =        "Why {I} do declare!: declarative programming in the
                 undergraduate curriculum",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "398--399",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364758",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Many curricular guidelines, such as the Recommended
                 Curriculum for Computer Science at Liberal Arts
                 Colleges [4], suggest that students be exposed to many
                 different programming paradigms (e.g., imperative,
                 functional, object-oriented, declarative) in the
                 undergraduate curriculum. Some institutions believe
                 that students should have early exposure to many
                 paradigms, often as early as the first two courses.
                 Many institutions emphasize object-oriented programming
                 early in the curriculum. Some also include functional
                 programming. Imperative topics are often covered in
                 courses that emphasize object-oriented or functional
                 issues. Where does declarative programming fit?
                 Sometimes not until an upper-level language paradigms
                 course or artificial intelligence course. Sometimes it
                 never fits, at least not explicitly.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Chu:2001:ITC,
  author =       "Bei-Tseng (Bill) Chu and Venu Dasigi and John Gorgone
                 and David Spooner",
  title =        "Information technology curriculum development",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "400--401",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364760",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Hitchner:2001:PEC,
  author =       "Lewis E. Hitchner and Judith Gersting and Peter B.
                 Henderson and Philip Machanick and Yale N. Patt",
  title =        "Programming early considered harmful",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "402--403",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364761",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "The premise of this panel is that most introductory
                 Computer Science courses are too narrowly focused on
                 teaching students a programming language. This is a
                 controversy that has been debated for years, but in
                 recent years seems to have been forgotten. The writers
                 of Computing Curricula 1991 stated:``Many feel that the
                 amount of attention traditionally paid to the syntax of
                 a programming language in the first course is
                 excessive, and ought to be replaced with a more
                 balanced introduction to the discipline. For these
                 reasons, PR: Introduction to a Programming Language is
                 defined as a separate knowledge unit in Part II, but is
                 not a required part of the common requirements.
                 ''[1]This panel will present a review of current,
                 typical first year courses and evidence for the case
                 against focusing those courses on the teaching of a
                 programming language. Next, each panelist will present
                 his or her philosophy for a first course, followed by
                 details of the courses at their school that implement
                 their view, and conclude with outcomes and evidence of
                 success of the courses. The panel includes four
                 experienced CS-1/CS-2 educators, two of whom are
                 members of the Computing Curriculum 2001 Pedagogy Focus
                 Group on Introductory Courses and Topics (including the
                 chair), and two of whom are authors of introductory
                 texts that do not focus on teaching a programming
                 language.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Goldweber:2001:URU,
  author =       "Michael Goldweber and Clare Congdon and Barry Fagin
                 and Deborah Hwang and Frank Klassner",
  title =        "The use of robots in the undergraduate curriculum:
                 experience reports",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "404--405",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364763",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Using the robot as a metaphor for assisting students
                 in understanding problem solving in general, the
                 algorithmic process, and the relationship between
                 algorithms and computing agents is not new. While
                 simulated robot environments have existed for many
                 years (e.g., Karel the Robot[3]) it is only recently
                 that the technology for inexpensively supplying
                 undergraduates with real robots has become available.
                 Lego Mindstorms, MIT Handyboards, the Rug Warrior, and
                 others are examples of such systems. Programmable in
                 familiar languages, including C, Ada, and Java, these
                 systems allow for the creative exploration of important
                 computer science concepts. Representing a variety of
                 institution types the panelists will discuss their
                 experiences in using hands-on robot-based projects for
                 illustrating various important computer science
                 concepts.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Stewart-Gardiner:2001:CVP,
  author =       "Carolee Stewart-Gardiner and David G. Kay and Joyce
                 Currie Little and Joseph D. Chase and John Fendrich and
                 Laurie A. Williams and Ursula Wolz",
  title =        "Collaboration vs plagiarism in computer science
                 programming courses",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "406--407",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364790",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "In some circles, all programming is collaborative, yet
                 in many CS1 and CS2 courses, individual programming
                 assignments are made, collaboration with other students
                 is cheating, and tailoring a program found on the web
                 is plagiarism. Many educators feel that collaboration
                 belongs only in a very few upper division courses.
                 Others have experience to show that early collaboration
                 broadens the learning of students, to become more
                 effective professional individuals. Most conclude that
                 a blend of the two styles is best for students, and can
                 reduce cheating/plagiarism. Does collaboration belong
                 in programming classes? Where does collaboration end
                 and cheating/plagiarism begin? What are the advantages,
                 problems and techniques of allowing collaboration on
                 programming assignments in CS1 and CS2? The moderator
                 created six discussion questions. Each member of the
                 panel has chosen the position they can strongly support
                 from experience. This panel will discuss these
                 questions in detail among the panelists and audience.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Dale:2001:WTW,
  author =       "Nell Dale and Rick Mercer and Elliot Koffman and
                 Walter Savitch",
  title =        "Writing a textbook: walking the gauntlet",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "408--409",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364793",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Writing my first textbook was an eye-opening
                 experience. I had to dig deep. I had ideas I was
                 excited about and found others that were excited about
                 them as well. I also found strong opposition to my
                 approach, which was difficult for publishers to
                 evaluate. My experience raised a number of questions
                 that I have outlined below. These questions range from
                 personnel motivation to future trends in computing. I
                 have gathered a panel of respected authors. I have
                 asked each to respond to some of these questions. Time
                 will also be available for the audience to ask
                 questions and share their own experiences.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Becker:2001:PP,
  author =       "Byron Weber Becker and Richard Rasala and Joseph
                 Bergin and Christine Shannon and Eugene Wallingford",
  title =        "Polymorphic panelists",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "410--411",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364795",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Polymorphism is an important object-oriented
                 programming concept in which objects from two or more
                 different classes respond to the same set of messages.
                 For instance, HourlyEmployee, SalariedEmployee, and
                 ContractEmployee all respond to the message
                 calculatePay(). Instances of each class ``do the right
                 thing'' to calculate their pay even though the methods
                 to do so may be quite different. But the payroll
                 program using these classes doesn't care --- it can ask
                 each object for the amount owed without caring what
                 kind of employee it represents or how the amount is
                 calculated. The panelists are all instances of
                 subclasses of Professor which will respond to the
                 following queries. Since each of the subclasses
                 implement these queries differently, the answers will
                 usually be different as well! $ \bullet $
                 polymorphPreconditions(): The object (professor)
                 specifies the information students must know before
                 polymorphism is introduced in their class. $ \bullet $
                 polymorphPresentation(): The object (professor)
                 describes how polymorphism is introduced in their
                 class. $ \bullet $ polymorphStudentUsage(): The object
                 (professor) describes how their students use
                 polymorphism later in the course. $ \bullet $
                 answerQuestions(): The object (professor) responds to
                 any questions about their approach.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Parlante:2001:NAP,
  author =       "Nick Parlante and Mike Clancy and Stuart Reges and
                 Julie Zelenski and Owen Astrachan",
  title =        "Nifty assignments panel",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "412--413",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364797",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Curtin:2001:NBA,
  author =       "Dan Curtin and Gary Lewandowski and Carla Purdy and
                 Dennis Gibson and Lisa Meeden",
  title =        "The nuts and bolts of academic careers: a primer for
                 students and beginning faculty",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "414--415",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364799",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Ferren:2001:DDC,
  author =       "Ann S. Ferren and J. A. N. Lee and Ivan Liss and J. D.
                 Chase and Robert Phillips",
  title =        "The design and development of the {College of
                 Information Technology} at {Radford University}",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "416--417",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364801",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Prey:2001:ASN,
  author =       "Jane Prey",
  title =        "{ACM SIGCSE NSF CCLI} project showcase",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "418--418",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364803",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Grissom:2001:PTT,
  author =       "Scott Grissom and Tom Naps and Nick Parlante and
                 Pamela Lawhead",
  title =        "Practical teaching tips from around the world",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "419--419",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364807",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Bernat:2001:TAN,
  author =       "Andrew Bernat and Harriet Taylor",
  title =        "Taking advantage of national science foundation
                 funding opportunities",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "420--420",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364809",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Gorgone:2001:SIS,
  author =       "John T. Gorgone and Doris K. Lidtke and David
                 Feinstein",
  title =        "Status of information systems accreditation",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "421--422",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364811",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Accreditation standards have been developed for BS
                 programs in Information Systems and have been widely
                 reviewed. The standards drew heavily on the existing
                 computer science accreditation standard and recent
                 curriculum efforts in information systems. The effort
                 was facilitated by support from the National Science
                 Foundation (NSFDUE 9812278). Recently CSAB approved the
                 process to accredit IS programs and that accreditation
                 will begin in Fall 2002.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Gries:2001:ACG,
  author =       "David Gries and Kathleen Larson and Susan H. Rodger
                 and Mark A. Weiss and Ursula Wolz",
  title =        "{AP CS} goes {OO}",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "423--24",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364813",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Ginat:2001:CIA,
  author =       "David Ginat and Dan Garcia and Owen Astrachan and
                 Joseph Bergin",
  title =        "Colorful illustrations of algorithmic design
                 techniques and problem solving",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "425--426",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364814",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Farrior:2001:UPM,
  author =       "Debra Burton Farrior and Daniel E. Hallock",
  title =        "Using project management concepts and {Microsoft}
                 project software as a tool to develop and manage both
                 on-line and on-campus courses and student team
                 projects",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "427--427",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364816",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Epstein:2001:PTE,
  author =       "Richard G. Epstein",
  title =        "The play's the thing: {ElderCare VR}",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "428--428",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364818",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Alphonce:2001:TUS,
  author =       "Carl Alphonce and Debra Burhans and Helene Kershner
                 and Barbara Sherman and Deborah Walters and Erica Eddy
                 and Gloria Melara and Pete DePasquale and J. Philip
                 East and Fred Springsteel and Kurt F. Lauckner",
  title =        "Teaching using off-the shelf on-line materials",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "429--430",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364819",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "The use of off-the-shelf on-line materials presents
                 several challenges. In this session panelists report on
                 their experiences in evaluating, installing and using
                 such materials. Both positive and negative aspects of
                 such use are discussed. The aim of the session is to
                 provide useful information to those considering using
                 (and those already using) on-line materials in their
                 teaching. The session presents information in three
                 mini-presentations, followed by a general discussion
                 session.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Denning:2001:MCI,
  author =       "Peter J. Denning and Wayne Dyksen and Richard LeBlanc
                 and Edward Robertson",
  title =        "Model curricula for {IT} schools: report of a
                 curriculum committee",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "431--432",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364823",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Roberts:2001:CCH,
  author =       "Eric Roberts and Gerald Engel and C. Fay Cover and
                 Andrew McGettrick and Carl Chang and Ursula Wolz",
  title =        "Computing curricula 2001 how will it work for you?",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "433--434",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/366413.364825",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:46 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "In the fall of 1998, the ACM Education Board and the
                 Educational Activities Board of the IEEE Computer
                 Society appointed representatives to a joint task force
                 to prepare Computing Curricula 2001 (CC2001), the next
                 installment in a series of reports on the undergraduate
                 computer science curriculum that began in 1968 and was
                 then updated in 1978 and 1991. Interim reports on the
                 initial planning of the curriculum were presented at
                 the SIGCSE symposium and the IEEE Frontiers in
                 Education Conference in both 1999 and 2000. The CC2001
                 Task Force released its first draft report at the 2000
                 SIGCSE conference and plans to release its penultimate
                 draft at SIGCSE 2001. The purpose of this session is to
                 describe how we expect the recommendations of the
                 report to apply in practice. The panelists represent a
                 range of institutions and can therefore speak to the
                 questions that audience members from similar
                 institutions might have.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Turner:2001:IER,
  author =       "Joe Turner",
  title =        "Invited editorial: reflections on curriculum
                 development in computing programs",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "4--6",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/571922.571924",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:49 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "DBLP;
                 http://dblp.uni-trier.de/db/journals/sigcse/sigcse33.html#Turner01;
                 http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  URL =          "ftp://ftp.math.utah.edu/pub/mirrors/ftp.ira.uka.de/bibliography/Misc/DBLP/2001.bib",
  abstract =     "Constant changes in courses and curricula seem to be a
                 fact of life for computing programs. Having
                 participated in several curriculum creation and
                 modification efforts, and in two major curriculum
                 recommendation projects [1,2], and also having observed
                 and reviewed many curriculum development efforts by
                 others during the past 20 years or so, I take this
                 opportunity to offer some observations about computing
                 programs and issues related to their evolution and
                 maintenance. (The term computing is used here to
                 include programs with a wide range of names such as
                 computer science, informatics, information systems, and
                 computer engineering.) Most of the observations and
                 comments that I make have been made before by myself
                 and others, and there is no intention to make this a
                 complete discussion of such issues. Instead, I offer
                 some observations that seem, to me, important and
                 relevant for many of the problems that we face today.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Martin:2001:ECW,
  author =       "C. Dianne Martin",
  title =        "{.Ethics @ .coms}: why {Internet} start-ups need
                 ethics codes",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "7--8",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/571922.571926",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:49 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "DBLP;
                 http://dblp.uni-trier.de/db/journals/sigcse/sigcse33.html#Martin01;
                 http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  URL =          "ftp://ftp.math.utah.edu/pub/mirrors/ftp.ira.uka.de/bibliography/Misc/DBLP/2001.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Lee:2001:HCS,
  author =       "John A. N. Lee",
  title =        "History in computer science education: across the
                 curriculum initiatives",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "8--8",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/571922.571928",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:49 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "DBLP;
                 http://dblp.uni-trier.de/db/journals/sigcse/sigcse33.html#Lee01;
                 http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  URL =          "ftp://ftp.math.utah.edu/pub/mirrors/ftp.ira.uka.de/bibliography/Misc/DBLP/2001.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Clear:2001:RPN,
  author =       "Tony Clear",
  title =        "Research paradigms and the nature of meaning and
                 truth",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "9--10",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/571922.571930",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:49 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "DBLP;
                 http://dblp.uni-trier.de/db/journals/sigcse/sigcse33.html#Clear01;
                 http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  URL =          "ftp://ftp.math.utah.edu/pub/mirrors/ftp.ira.uka.de/bibliography/Misc/DBLP/2001.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Gorgone:2001:NIC,
  author =       "John T. Gorgone",
  title =        "National {IT} curricula: issues, definition, trends,
                 and standards",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "11--12",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/571922.571932",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:49 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "DBLP;
                 http://dblp.uni-trier.de/db/journals/sigcse/sigcse33.html#Gorgone01;
                 http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  URL =          "ftp://ftp.math.utah.edu/pub/mirrors/ftp.ira.uka.de/bibliography/Misc/DBLP/2001.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Dale:2001:A,
  author =       "Nell Dale",
  title =        "{ACE} 2000",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "12--14",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/571922.571934",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:49 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "DBLP;
                 http://dblp.uni-trier.de/db/journals/sigcse/sigcse33.html#Dale01;
                 http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  URL =          "ftp://ftp.math.utah.edu/pub/mirrors/ftp.ira.uka.de/bibliography/Misc/DBLP/2001.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{McCauley:2001:BAL,
  author =       "Ren{\'e}e McCauley",
  title =        "A bounty of accessible language translation tools",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "14--15",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/571922.571936",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:49 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "DBLP;
                 http://dblp.uni-trier.de/db/journals/sigcse/sigcse33.html#McCauley01;
                 http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  URL =          "ftp://ftp.math.utah.edu/pub/mirrors/ftp.ira.uka.de/bibliography/Misc/DBLP/2001.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Knox:2001:MSR,
  author =       "Deborah L. Knox",
  title =        "Mentoring student research: award winning poster
                 presentations",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "15--17",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/571922.571938",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:49 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "DBLP;
                 http://dblp.uni-trier.de/db/journals/sigcse/sigcse33.html#Knox01;
                 http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  URL =          "ftp://ftp.math.utah.edu/pub/mirrors/ftp.ira.uka.de/bibliography/Misc/DBLP/2001.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Gersting:2001:SWW,
  author =       "Judith L. Gersting and Frank H. Young",
  title =        "Shall we write?",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "18--19",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/571922.571940",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:49 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "DBLP;
                 http://dblp.uni-trier.de/db/journals/sigcse/sigcse33.html#GerstingY01;
                 http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  URL =          "ftp://ftp.math.utah.edu/pub/mirrors/ftp.ira.uka.de/bibliography/Misc/DBLP/2001.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Ginat:2001:CC,
  author =       "David Ginat",
  title =        "Color conversion",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "20--21",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/571922.571942",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:49 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "DBLP;
                 http://dblp.uni-trier.de/db/journals/sigcse/sigcse33.html#Ginat01;
                 http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  URL =          "ftp://ftp.math.utah.edu/pub/mirrors/ftp.ira.uka.de/bibliography/Misc/DBLP/2001.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Davies:2001:DLU,
  author =       "Gordon Davies",
  title =        "Distance learning at the {University of Texas--Pan
                 American}",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "22--23",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/571922.571944",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:49 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "DBLP;
                 http://dblp.uni-trier.de/db/journals/sigcse/sigcse33.html#Davies01;
                 http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  URL =          "ftp://ftp.math.utah.edu/pub/mirrors/ftp.ira.uka.de/bibliography/Misc/DBLP/2001.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Klee:2001:UTY,
  author =       "Karl J. Klee",
  title =        "Update on two-year college activities",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "23--24",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/571922.571946",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:49 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "DBLP;
                 http://dblp.uni-trier.de/db/journals/sigcse/sigcse33.html#Klee01;
                 http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  URL =          "ftp://ftp.math.utah.edu/pub/mirrors/ftp.ira.uka.de/bibliography/Misc/DBLP/2001.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Lee:2001:TLC,
  author =       "John A. N. Lee",
  title =        "Teaching and learning in the 21st century: the
                 development of ``future {CS} faculty''",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "25--30",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/571922.571948",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:49 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "DBLP;
                 http://dblp.uni-trier.de/db/journals/sigcse/sigcse33.html#Lee01a;
                 http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  URL =          "ftp://ftp.math.utah.edu/pub/mirrors/ftp.ira.uka.de/bibliography/Misc/DBLP/2001.bib",
  abstract =     "Radical changes in teaching methods combined with the
                 impact of the world wide web and the perceived need to
                 make greater uses of the computer in education place
                 the new faculty member at a considerable disadvantage.
                 The TV generation of students find that it is no longer
                 satisfying for a teacher to profess through stand-up
                 lectures and expectations of self-initiated activities
                 on the part of the learners. Additionally, a new topic
                 needs to infiltrate the computer science curriculum, a
                 topic that is not in the general repertoire of future
                 faculty. This topic combines studies of ethical,
                 social, and professional responsibilities with the
                 other elements of the field. This paper proposes a
                 curriculum for future faculty workshops to prepare new
                 faculty to serve their departments.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Hadjerrouit:2001:WBA,
  author =       "Said Hadjerrouit",
  title =        "{Web}-based application development: a software
                 engineering approach",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "31--34",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/571922.571949",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:49 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "DBLP;
                 http://dblp.uni-trier.de/db/journals/sigcse/sigcse33.html#Hadjerrouit01;
                 http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  URL =          "ftp://ftp.math.utah.edu/pub/mirrors/ftp.ira.uka.de/bibliography/Misc/DBLP/2001.bib",
  abstract =     "In contrast to the construction of centralised
                 software systems which relies on a well established
                 approach, there is a lack of a proven methodology that
                 guides software engineers in building web-based
                 applications. The focus is still on technology rather
                 than analysis and design issues. However, just as the
                 focus in software engineering shifted from programming
                 to process thirty years ago, the focus with web-based
                 construction must shift from technical issues to the
                 development process. This paper describes a software
                 engineering methodology for developing web-based
                 applications motivated by pedagogical and pragmatic
                 considerations.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Rolfe:2001:BCR,
  author =       "Timothy J. Rolfe",
  title =        "Binomial coefficient recursion: the good, and the bad
                 and ugly",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "35--36",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/571922.571950",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:49 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "DBLP;
                 http://dblp.uni-trier.de/db/journals/sigcse/sigcse33.html#Rolfe01;
                 http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  URL =          "ftp://ftp.math.utah.edu/pub/mirrors/ftp.ira.uka.de/bibliography/Misc/DBLP/2001.bib",
  abstract =     "The binomial coefficient or, alternatively, the number
                 of combinations of n items taken k at a time, provides
                 two defining recurrences. One of these provides a very
                 useful recursive function a very good way for a program
                 to calculate this function. The other provides a very
                 wasteful recursive function the balancing bad and ugly
                 way.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Olagunju:2001:JCS,
  author =       "Amos O. Olagunju and Katrenia Geiger",
  title =        "Just clicking some theoretical aspects of computing",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "37--38",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/571922.571951",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:49 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "DBLP;
                 http://dblp.uni-trier.de/db/journals/sigcse/sigcse33.html#OlagunjuG01;
                 http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  URL =          "ftp://ftp.math.utah.edu/pub/mirrors/ftp.ira.uka.de/bibliography/Misc/DBLP/2001.bib",
  abstract =     "This paper discusses recurring challenges confronting
                 pedagogical pioneers of an introduction to the theory
                 of computing at the undergraduate level. A generalized
                 click game is presented for use as a vehicle to
                 vitalize the introduction of the elements of the theory
                 of computing.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Miller:2001:PEC,
  author =       "Nancy E. Miller and Donna S. Reese",
  title =        "A placement examination for computer science {II}",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "39--42",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/571922.571952",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:49 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "DBLP;
                 http://dblp.uni-trier.de/db/journals/sigcse/sigcse33.html#MillerR01;
                 http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  URL =          "ftp://ftp.math.utah.edu/pub/mirrors/ftp.ira.uka.de/bibliography/Misc/DBLP/2001.bib",
  abstract =     "Students enrolling in Computer Science II at
                 Mississippi State University (MSU) have widely varying
                 backgrounds. Some have taken the prerequisite course at
                 MSU, some have transferred from community colleges
                 offering the prerequisite, and some are new graduate
                 students with undergraduate deficiencies. Proper
                 placement of students in the introductory courses is
                 necessary to give those students with little background
                 in object-oriented software development an opportunity
                 for success, while challenging students who may have
                 had substantial programming experience elsewhere. The
                 Department has developed and tested a placement
                 examination. The examination helps students decide if
                 they should enroll in an introductory course that
                 assumes some previous programming experience without
                 object-oriented software development, or if they should
                 begin in Computer Science II that assumes knowledge of
                 C++ with object-oriented design. The score on the
                 placement exam demonstrated predictive power when
                 trying to distinguish, coarsely, between those students
                 who will probably pass the Computer Science II course
                 and those students who are at risk of failing the
                 course.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Beaubouef:2001:USE,
  author =       "Theresa Beaubouef and Richard Lucas and James Howatt",
  title =        "The {UNLOCK} system: enhancing problem solving skills
                 in {CS}-1 students",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "43--46",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/571922.571953",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:49 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "DBLP;
                 http://dblp.uni-trier.de/db/journals/sigcse/sigcse33.html#BeaubouefLH01;
                 http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  URL =          "ftp://ftp.math.utah.edu/pub/mirrors/ftp.ira.uka.de/bibliography/Misc/DBLP/2001.bib",
  abstract =     "Many colleges typically lose 50\% of their CS1
                 students because they possess no fundamental problem
                 solving skill. The development of an interactive
                 learning tool, UNLOCK, teaches students those
                 fundamental skills. This article describes UNLOCK. The
                 goal is to increase CS1 retention, thereby increasing
                 the numbers of CS graduates.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Butler:2001:WBL,
  author =       "Jucain E. Butler and Jay B. Brockman",
  title =        "A {Web}-based learning tool that simulates a simple
                 computer architecture",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "47--50",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/571922.571954",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:49 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "DBLP;
                 http://dblp.uni-trier.de/db/journals/sigcse/sigcse33.html#ButlerB01;
                 http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  URL =          "ftp://ftp.math.utah.edu/pub/mirrors/ftp.ira.uka.de/bibliography/Misc/DBLP/2001.bib",
  abstract =     "As a supplement to an introduction to engineering
                 systems course, the article presents a self-paced,
                 web-based learning tool that introduces computer
                 concepts by simulating the Lego Mindstorm's RCX
                 programmable brick. It discusses the motivation for
                 creating this tool and its implementation. The
                 materials presented give students a broader perspective
                 of an engineering system (the computer) and a sense of
                 what goes on under the hood of a computer. They also
                 give students, in conjunction with a physical
                 laboratory project, a sense of working on a real
                 workplace assignment.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Golub:2001:PBD,
  author =       "Evan Golub",
  title =        "{PC}-based development environments and a
                 {Unix}-centric curriculum: some practical issues",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "51--54",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/571922.571955",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:49 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "DBLP;
                 http://dblp.uni-trier.de/db/journals/sigcse/sigcse33.html#Golub01;
                 http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  URL =          "ftp://ftp.math.utah.edu/pub/mirrors/ftp.ira.uka.de/bibliography/Misc/DBLP/2001.bib",
  abstract =     "As computers have become a more common household item,
                 computer science students are able to work at home
                 rather than in campus labs. At institutions that have
                 Unix-centric resources, students are able to use these
                 home computers to connect to campus machines remotely.
                 However, some students want to use a PC-based
                 development environment rather than the ones available
                 under Unix. Do they gain an advantage? Are there
                 problems that they will encounter when they bring their
                 program into the Unix environment?",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Gupta:2001:ITL,
  author =       "Gireesh K. Gupta",
  title =        "Information technology and liberal arts",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "55--57",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/571922.571956",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:49 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "DBLP;
                 http://dblp.uni-trier.de/db/journals/sigcse/sigcse33.html#Gupta01;
                 http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  URL =          "ftp://ftp.math.utah.edu/pub/mirrors/ftp.ira.uka.de/bibliography/Misc/DBLP/2001.bib",
  abstract =     "A college campus without information technology
                 resources is like a human body without the nervous
                 system. Today, information technology is essential to
                 learning and communication. Small liberal arts
                 institutions must provide information technology
                 resources on their campuses and must upgrade them
                 regularly to incorporate technological advancements not
                 only to provide better education, but also for the very
                 survival.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Ben-Ari:2001:BDR,
  author =       "Mordechai Ben-Ari",
  title =        "The bug that destroyed a rocket",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "58--59",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/571922.571958",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:49 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "DBLP;
                 http://dblp.uni-trier.de/db/journals/sigcse/sigcse33.html#Ben-Ari01;
                 http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  URL =          "ftp://ftp.math.utah.edu/pub/mirrors/ftp.ira.uka.de/bibliography/Misc/DBLP/2001.bib",
  abstract =     "In the 2000 December issue of inroads, Michael
                 Williams suggested that the failure of the Ariane 5
                 rocket launch could be used as a case study in teaching
                 programming concepts. Here is an article I wrote
                 several years ago in which I present the story of the
                 Ariane 5 in terms used to teach introductory computer
                 science.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Walker:2001:STR,
  author =       "Henry Walker",
  title =        "{SIGCSE Treasurer}'s report for the {June 2001 SIGCSE
                 Bulletin}",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "60--62",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/571922.571960",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:49 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "DBLP;
                 http://dblp.uni-trier.de/db/journals/sigcse/sigcse33.html#Walker01;
                 http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  URL =          "ftp://ftp.math.utah.edu/pub/mirrors/ftp.ira.uka.de/bibliography/Misc/DBLP/2001.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Almstrum:2001:STF,
  author =       "Vicki L. Almstrum and C. Neville Dean and Don Goelman
                 and Thomas B. Hilburn and Jan Smith",
  title =        "Support for teaching formal methods",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "71--88",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/571922.571962",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:49 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "DBLP;
                 http://dblp.uni-trier.de/db/journals/sigcse/sigcse33.html#AlmstrumDGHS01;
                 http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  URL =          "ftp://ftp.math.utah.edu/pub/mirrors/ftp.ira.uka.de/bibliography/Misc/DBLP/2001.bib",
  abstract =     "This report describes a growth path for the area
                 referred to as formal methods within the computing
                 education community. We define the term formal methods
                 and situate it within our field by highlighting its
                 role in Computing Curricula 1991, Computing Curricula
                 2001, and the SoftWare Engineering Body Of Knowledge
                 (SWEBOK). The working group proposes an enhancement to
                 an existing web resource, which is a rich collection of
                 materials and links related to formal methods. The new
                 resource is designed to provide a bridge between the
                 general computing education community and the formal
                 methods community. The goal is to allow the latter to
                 provide useful support for the former for the ultimate
                 benefit of all of our students. Eventually, the working
                 group aspires to see the concepts of formal methods
                 integrated seamlessly into the computing curriculum so
                 that it is not necessary to separate them in our
                 discussions.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Bergin:2001:NPR,
  author =       "Joseph Bergin and Charles Kelemen and Myles F. McNally
                 and Thomas L. Naps and Michael Goldweber and Chris
                 Power and Stephen J. Hartley",
  title =        "Non-programming resources for an introduction to {CS}:
                 a collection of resources for the first courses in
                 computer science",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "89--100",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/571922.571963",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:49 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "DBLP;
                 http://dblp.uni-trier.de/db/journals/sigcse/sigcse33.html#BerginKMNGPH01;
                 http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  URL =          "ftp://ftp.math.utah.edu/pub/mirrors/ftp.ira.uka.de/bibliography/Misc/DBLP/2001.bib",
  abstract =     "Well constructed non-programming resources have proven
                 invaluable in aiding students master introductory CS
                 topics. Unfortunately, such resources are hard to
                 identify and/or develop. A working group was convened
                 concurrent with the ITiCSE 2000 conference to examine
                 this issue. This paper, and an accompanying Web page
                 (http://csis.pace.edu/~bergin/iticse2000) have
                 therefore been developed to foster the development and
                 distribution of resources that educators can use to
                 introduce important introductory computer science
                 topics without programming.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Clear:2001:DDL,
  author =       "Tony Clear and Arto Haataja and Jeanine Meyer and
                 Jarkko Suhonen and Stuart A. Varden",
  title =        "Dimensions of distance learning for computer
                 education",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "101--110",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/571922.571964",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:49 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "DBLP;
                 http://dblp.uni-trier.de/db/journals/sigcse/sigcse33.html#ClearHMSV01;
                 http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  URL =          "ftp://ftp.math.utah.edu/pub/mirrors/ftp.ira.uka.de/bibliography/Misc/DBLP/2001.bib",
  abstract =     "In this paper, we explore what is variously termed
                 distance learning (DL), asynchronous, online,
                 Web-based, and Web-supported learning in terms of how
                 it can support and perhaps even improve the fields of
                 education involving computing. We use the term
                 distributed education to cover all mentioned topics. We
                 describe how the incorporation of these methods can
                 benefit computer education. These benefits arise
                 because of the nature of the computing field, the
                 profound requirements for students to understand
                 concepts and acquire skills as opposed to mere exposure
                 to facts, and our assessment that distributed education
                 has the potential to address many of the challenges
                 identified. We conclude with suggestions on the
                 incorporation of distributed methods into computer
                 education.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Cassel:2001:DET,
  author =       "Lillian (Boots) Cassel and Mark A. Holliday and Deepak
                 Kumar and John Impagliazzo and Kevin Bolding and Murray
                 Pearson and Jim Davies and Gregory S. Wolffe and
                 William Yurcik",
  title =        "Distributed expertise for teaching computer
                 organization \& architecture",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "111--126",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/571922.571965",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:49 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "DBLP;
                 http://dblp.uni-trier.de/db/journals/sigcse/sigcse33.html#CasselHKIBPDWY01;
                 http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  URL =          "ftp://ftp.math.utah.edu/pub/mirrors/ftp.ira.uka.de/bibliography/Misc/DBLP/2001.bib",
  abstract =     "This report presents preliminary results from our
                 project on creating distributed expertise for teaching
                 computer organization \& architecture course(s) in the
                 undergraduate computer science curriculum. We present
                 the details of an online survey designed to gather
                 information from faculty on the current state of
                 teaching this course. The survey also tries to identify
                 specific areas of need for creating distributed
                 expertise as reported by various faculty. We also
                 present several resources that have been identified
                 that are available for use by faculty teaching the
                 course(s). This report represents a mid-point of an
                 ongoing two-year study. Following a discussion of the
                 currently identified needs, we discuss ways to address
                 them and conclude the report with a plan of action that
                 will follow in the next phase of the project.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Lavonen:2001:UCS,
  author =       "Jari Lavonen and Veijo Meisalo and Matti Lattu and
                 Liisa Leinonen and Tadeusz Wilusz",
  title =        "Using computers in science and technology education",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "127--135",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/571922.571966",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:49 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "DBLP;
                 http://dblp.uni-trier.de/db/journals/sigcse/sigcse33.html#LavonenMLLW01;
                 http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  URL =          "ftp://ftp.math.utah.edu/pub/mirrors/ftp.ira.uka.de/bibliography/Misc/DBLP/2001.bib",
  abstract =     "This working group wishes to promote interaction of
                 computer scientists and educational researchers. Such
                 an interaction would benefit not only educational
                 sciences and computer science education but also
                 contribute to computer science e.g., through behaviour
                 metaphors in robotics. We have initiated an analysis of
                 computer uses in education starting from applications
                 especially in science and technology education. Having
                 analysed various roles of computers in educational
                 processes in the above area we have also identified
                 technological requirements of modern learning
                 environments and defined the concept of a rich learning
                 environment. We use the Open Market metaphor to
                 concretise this concept in two different cases.
                 Finally, we present as an outcome of our cooperative
                 analysis basic goals for technological literacy and a
                 description of a technology literate student.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Little:2001:ICI,
  author =       "Joyce Currie Little and Mary J. Granger and Elizabeth
                 S. Adams and Jaana Holvikivi and Susan K. Lippert and
                 Henry MacKay Walker and Alison Young",
  title =        "Integrating cultural issues into the computer and
                 information technology curriculum",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "136--154",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/571922.571967",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:49 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "DBLP;
                 http://dblp.uni-trier.de/db/journals/sigcse/sigcse33.html#LittleGAHLWY01;
                 http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  URL =          "ftp://ftp.math.utah.edu/pub/mirrors/ftp.ira.uka.de/bibliography/Misc/DBLP/2001.bib",
  abstract =     "Industry leaders and educators in Computer and
                 Information Technology (CIT) have expressed a need for
                 graduates to have a background in professional,
                 societal, and ethical concerns as well as a strong
                 technical capability (Huff and Martin, 1995). Some
                 educators have gone so far as to include cultural
                 awareness: ``The cultural dimensions of information
                 technology can no longer be ignored, with the expansion
                 of the global economy, global markets and global
                 communication enabled by information technology''
                 (Hasan and Ditsa, 1998, p. 5). The rationale for
                 supporting and enhancing instruction in cultural issues
                 for CIT workers comes from the growing globalization of
                 the world in communication, the increase of
                 trans-national organizational mergers and partnerships,
                 the merging of various populations within national
                 boundaries, the increasing traffic of individuals to
                 different countries around the world, and the severe
                 shortage of information technology personnel throughout
                 the world. This paper provides material to support the
                 inclusion of cultural issues within the CIT curriculum.
                 The topics identified, which include diversity and
                 multiculturalism, organizational cultures, professional
                 cultures, socio-economic issues, and gender issues,
                 form a foundation body of knowledge that, once learned,
                 can improve and enhance the work of the information
                 technology professional. Exercises are provided that
                 can be incorporated into existing CIT courses across a
                 wide variety of programs, nations, and cultures. As the
                 internationalization of education continues, more
                 exercises and examples will surely arise from the CIT
                 community.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Bruce:2001:EDP,
  author =       "Kim B. Bruce and Andrea P. Danyluk and Thomas P.
                 Murtagh",
  title =        "Event-driven programming is simple enough for {CS1}",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "1--4",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377440",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "We have recently designed a CS 1 course that
                 integrates event-driven programming from the very
                 start. Our experience teaching this course runs counter
                 to the prevailing sense that these techniques would add
                 complexity to the content of CS 1. Instead, we found
                 that they were simple to present and that they also
                 simplified the presentation of other material in the
                 course. In this paper, we explain the approach we used
                 to introduce event-driven methods and discuss the
                 factors underlying our success.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Aedo:2001:ASE,
  author =       "Ignacio Aedo and Paloma D{\'\i}az",
  title =        "Applying software engineering methods for hypermedia
                 systems",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "5--8",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377442",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Despite the existence of software engineering methods
                 for hypermedia development, this process is not as
                 systematic as it could be expected and, in fact, the
                 ``hypermedia software crisis'' still remains. This
                 situation can be attributed to the scarce dissemination
                 of methods for hypermedia. In this context, we present
                 our experience teaching a software engineering method
                 for hypermedia, called Ariadne, which is used to
                 develop hypermedia applications following a
                 user-centered approach.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Vat:2001:THS,
  author =       "Kam Hou Vat",
  title =        "Teaching {HCI} with scenario-based design: the
                 constructivist's synthesis",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "9--12",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377445",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "This paper describes the application of scenario-based
                 design in the teaching of Human-Computer Interaction
                 (HCI), in an undergraduate Software Engineering
                 program. Specifically, we describe how the ideas of
                 constructivism can be synthesized with the team-based
                 efforts in managing software requirements. The paper
                 serves as an experience report of an ongoing action
                 research the author has been executing to revise the
                 curriculum and pedagogy of a junior core course
                 entitled Software Psychology. In particular, we depict
                 some problem scenarios, helping the evolution of the
                 course content, and developing our students as
                 self-directed work teams of software professionals. The
                 paper concludes with the author's lessons learned with
                 this course enactment plus the necessary reflective
                 evaluations therein.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Czajkowski:2001:SPS,
  author =       "Michael F. Czajkowski and Cheryl V. Foster and Thomas
                 T. Hewett and Joseph A. Casacio and William C. Regli
                 and Heike A. Sperber",
  title =        "A student project in software evaluation",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "13--16",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377446",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Properly educating computer scientists involves
                 teaching effective means to properly engineer a system.
                 An important part of such engineering work is ensuring
                 that the computing system is both useful and usable.
                 While many systems out there today are difficult to
                 use, performing usability engineering on a system
                 during its development has been shown to be an
                 effective way to make a system more usable. The problem
                 is fitting practical experience into the curriculum.
                 This paper discusses a case example of how a team of
                 undergraduate students learned to take a software
                 system during its developing stages and perform
                 effective usability engineering following the
                 ``thinking out loud'' methodology.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Guzdial:2001:UCM,
  author =       "Mark Guzdial",
  title =        "Use of collaborative multimedia in computer science
                 classes",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "17--20",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377452",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "While there is a lot of speculation about the benefits
                 of multimedia exploration, research on learning and
                 technology suggests that the creation of media by
                 students has even greater benefit for learning.
                 Students learn through articulating their knowledge in
                 their multimedia documents, reviewing their own work,
                 and receiving comments and critiques on their work. In
                 the research of the Collaborative Software Lab
                 (http://coweb.cc.gatech.edu/csl), we are particularly
                 interested in exploring the creation of media through
                 collaborative technology. By having students work
                 together in creating diverse media, we encourage review
                 and critique, and create opportunities for joint
                 learning. We have been using an environment for
                 collaborative multimedia in several computer science
                 classes, and in this paper, we describe some of the
                 activities that teachers have invented for using the
                 CoWeb.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Mendes:2001:CFT,
  author =       "Emilia Mendes and Nile Mosley and Steve Counsell",
  title =        "The cognitive flexibility theory: an approach for
                 teaching {Hypermedia Engineering}",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "21--24",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377457",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Hypermedia engineering constitutes the employment of
                 an engineering approach to the development of
                 hypermedia applications. Its main teaching objectives
                 are for students to learn what an engineering approach
                 means and how measurement can be applied. This paper
                 presents the application of the Cognitive Flexibility
                 Theory as an instructional theory to teach Hypermedia
                 Engineering principles. Early results have shown that
                 students presented a greater learning variability
                 (suggested by their exam marks) when exposed to the CFT
                 as a teaching practice, compared to conventional
                 methods.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Sooriamurthi:2001:PCR,
  author =       "Raja Sooriamurthi",
  title =        "Problems in comprehending recursion and suggested
                 solutions",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "25--28",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377458",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Recursion is a very powerful and useful problem
                 solving strategy. But, along with pointers and dynamic
                 data structures, many beginning programmers consider
                 recursion to be a difficult concept to master. This
                 paper reports on a study of upper-division
                 undergraduate students on their difficulty in
                 comprehending the ideas behind recursion. Three issues
                 emerged as the points of difficulty for the students:
                 (1) insufficient exposure to declarative thinking in a
                 programming context (2) inadequate appreciation of the
                 concept of functional abstraction (3) lack of a proper
                 methodology to express a recursive solution. The paper
                 concludes with a discussion of our approach to teaching
                 recursion, which addresses these issues. Classroom
                 experience indicates this approach effectively aids
                 students' comprehension of recursion.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Learmonth:2001:FDI,
  author =       "Rod Learmonth",
  title =        "Flexible delivery of information systems as a core
                 {MBA} subject",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "29--32",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377459",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "In terms of prior education, culture and life
                 experience, a diverse student profile is evident in the
                 intake into the Master of Business Administration (MBA)
                 degree. Students may be experiencing tertiary education
                 for the first time (industry experience entry) or
                 adapting to a different education process
                 (international students).In redeveloping the core MBA
                 subject, Information Systems, materials were
                 constructed to support student-driven ``just in time''
                 learning. This argues for an information age
                 pedagogical model in which learning can occur with
                 efficiency, at the student's own pace, anytime and at a
                 location of their choosing. The paper outlines the
                 teaching and learning context, delivery infrastructure
                 and activities developed in response to this model.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Kolling:2001:GTO,
  author =       "Michael K{\"o}lling and John Rosenberg",
  title =        "Guidelines for teaching object orientation with
                 {Java}",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "33--36",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377461",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "How to best teach object orientation to first year
                 students is currently a topic of much debate. One of
                 the tools suggested to aid in this task is BlueJ, an
                 integrated development environment specifically
                 designed for teaching. BlueJ supports a unique style of
                 introduction of OO concepts. In this paper we discuss a
                 set of problems with OO teaching, present some
                 guidelines for better course design and show how BlueJ
                 can be used to make significant improvements to
                 introductory OO courses. We end by presenting a
                 description of a possible project sequence using this
                 teaching approach.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Murtagh:2001:TBF,
  author =       "Thomas P. Murtagh",
  title =        "Teaching breadth-first depth-first",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "37--40",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377462",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "This paper argues that current approaches to teaching
                 the introductory course for the CS major fail to
                 provide students with an accurate sense of the nature
                 of our field. We propose that an introductory course
                 focused on a single sub-field of our discipline could
                 better prepare potential majors by using that sub-field
                 as a vehicle to present an overview of the techniques
                 and principles fundamental to computer science. We
                 discuss our experience with such a course based on the
                 field of computer networks.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Haberman:2001:ABB,
  author =       "Bruria Haberman and Yifat Ben-David Kolikant",
  title =        "Activating ``black boxes'' instead of opening
                 ``zipper'' --- a method of teaching novices basic {CS}
                 concepts",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "41--44",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377464",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "In this paper we implement and evaluate of a unique
                 instructional method for teaching basic concepts in
                 computer science. This method is based on introducing a
                 new concept through activating ``black boxes'' that
                 demonstrate the properties of the concept and its role
                 in the computing process. We used the ``black
                 box''-based instructional method to teach basic
                 concepts of computation to novice high-school students.
                 Later we conducted research aimed at assessing the
                 effectiveness of this method on novice students'
                 perceptions of basic concepts in computation. Research
                 results indicated that students who learned according
                 to the ``black box''-based approach gained a better
                 understanding of the basic computational model,
                 compared to students who learned according to the
                 traditional ``zipper'' approach.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Kumar:2001:LIB,
  author =       "Amruth N. Kumar",
  title =        "Learning the interaction between pointers and scope in
                 {C++}",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "45--48",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377466",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Traditionally, pointers, and their interaction with
                 scope in C++ have been a source of frustration and
                 confusion for students in our Computer Science II
                 course. Since problem-solving is known to improve
                 learning [6], we set out to develop software that would
                 help our students better understand these concepts by
                 repeatedly solving problems based on them. In this
                 paper, we will first describe the design and features
                 of this software. We conducted tests in two sections of
                 our Computer Science II course this fall to evaluate
                 the effectiveness of using this software. The results
                 have been very encouraging: the class average in both
                 the sections increased by 100\% from the pretest to the
                 post-test. We will also present the design and results
                 of these tests.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Byrne:2001:ESA,
  author =       "Pat Byrne and Gerry Lyons",
  title =        "The effect of student attributes on success in
                 programming",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "49--52",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377467",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "This paper examines the relationship between student
                 results in a first year programming course and
                 predisposition factors of gender, prior computing
                 experience, learning style and academic performance to
                 date. While the study does not suggest that any
                 dominant attributes are related to success in
                 programming, there are some interesting outcomes which
                 will have implications for teaching and learning.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Jenkins:2001:MSP,
  author =       "Tony Jenkins",
  title =        "The motivation of students of programming",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "53--56",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377472",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Students approach the study of computing in Higher
                 Education in increasing numbers from an increasingly
                 wide variety of backgrounds. In most degree level
                 courses one of the first modules students will
                 encounter is intended to teach them to program. As the
                 students become more diverse, so do their motivations
                 for taking their degree. Anecdotal evidence from many
                 institutions is that students are becoming more
                 tactical, and will engage only in those activities that
                 they see as contributing to an eventual highly paid
                 job. This paper describes an investigation into the
                 motivations of students for taking a degree in
                 computing, and for studying programming in particular.
                 The results raise a number of issues for the teaching
                 of programming.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Lancaster:2001:TEF,
  author =       "Thomas Lancaster and Fintan Culwin",
  title =        "Towards an error free plagiarism detection process",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "57--60",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377473",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "For decades many computing departments have deployed
                 systems for the detection of plagiarised student source
                 code submissions. Automated systems to detect free-text
                 student plagiarism are just becoming available and the
                 experience of computing educators is valuable for their
                 successful deployment. This paper describes a
                 Four-Stage Plagiarism Detection Process that attempts
                 to ensure no suspicious similarity is missed and that
                 no student is unfairly accused of plagiarism. Required
                 characteristics of an effective similarity detection
                 engine are proposed and an investigation of a simple
                 engine is described. An innovative prototype tool
                 designed to decrease the workload of tutors
                 investigating undue similarity is also presented.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Dick:2001:IOC,
  author =       "Martin Dick and Judy Sheard and Selby Markham",
  title =        "Is it okay to cheat? --- the views of postgraduate
                 students",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "61--64",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377474",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "This paper examines the attitudes of students in the
                 Masters of Information Technology, Honours Degree in
                 the Bachelor of Computing and Graduate Diploma of
                 Computing at Monash University. Students were surveyed
                 on the acceptability of a variety of scenarios
                 involving cheating and on their knowledge of the
                 occurrence of these scenarios. The survey found a
                 strong consensus amongst the students as to what was
                 acceptable or unacceptable practice. The paper then
                 examines the significance of these results for
                 educators aiming to prevent cheating amongst their
                 students. The study reported is part of a larger study
                 currently being undertaken in the School of Computer
                 Science and Software Engineering (CSSE) at Monash
                 University.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Filho:2001:RES,
  author =       "Wilson P. Paula Filho",
  title =        "Requirements for an educational software development
                 process",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "65--68",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377476",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Software engineering education must provide the
                 students with knowledge and practice of software
                 development processes. These must be used in course
                 projects, to confront the students with realistic
                 software engineering issues. A requirements set for
                 educational software development processes is proposed
                 here. It includes requirements about process
                 architecture, team orientation, project life cycle,
                 standards and practices, student support and instructor
                 support. Some published real-life processes were
                 evaluated against these requirements, and a new process
                 was designed to meet them.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Hause:2001:IFS,
  author =       "Martha L. Hause and Vicki L. Almstrum and Mary Z. Last
                 and M. R. Woodroffe",
  title =        "Interaction factors in software development
                 performance in distributed student teams in computer
                 science",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "69--72",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377477",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "This research in progress paper compares the
                 characteristics of high and low performance distributed
                 student teams doing software development in Computer
                 Science. The distributed student teams were involved in
                 a software development project that was part of a
                 Computer Science course at two universities located in
                 different countries. We developed a set of categories
                 to examine the email communication of distributed
                 student teams. This paper tracks the progression and
                 changes in the categories coded for each team's
                 communication throughout the project's timeline,
                 particularly during key decision periods in the
                 software development cycle.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Rutherfoord:2001:UPI,
  author =       "Rebecca H. Rutherfoord",
  title =        "Using personality inventories to help form teams for
                 software engineering class projects",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "73--76",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377486",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "As faculty create their teams for software engineering
                 class projects various techniques may be used to create
                 these teams. Random selection as well as structured
                 assignments all have varied strengths and weaknesses.
                 One method for selecting students involves using
                 personality inventories to assess the various
                 personality types of the students. This paper will
                 discuss how the author used the Keirsey Temperament
                 Sorter to select teams for a software engineering class
                 and some of the results of this experiment.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Stevens:2001:ETS,
  author =       "K. Todd Stevens",
  title =        "Experiences teaching software engineering for the
                 first time",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "77--80",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377488",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "This paper presents an approach to teaching a Software
                 Engineering course, as well as significant feedback
                 from the students who were enrolled in the first
                 offering of the course using this approach. The course
                 provided students with conceptual material as well as
                 experience with a large project. Just teaching concepts
                 or major topics, while important, is not sufficient;
                 students need hands-on exposure to doing a large
                 project in order to comprehend the complexity of
                 building real systems. On the other hand a course
                 cannot ``teach'' only a project because students need a
                 conceptual framework, approaches, and techniques upon
                 which to base the complexities of software engineering.
                 The feedback from the students who took the first
                 offering of the course provides useful information to
                 anyone who teaches Software Engineering, in addition to
                 instructors preparing to teach the subject for the
                 first time.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Ginat:2001:MAU,
  author =       "David Ginat",
  title =        "Metacognitive awareness utilized for learning control
                 elements in algorithmic problem solving",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "81--84",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377490",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Students who demonstrate high self-explanation ability
                 show advanced metacognitive awareness of their own
                 problem solving process. This awareness can be utilized
                 to reveal and apply control elements they experience
                 during problem solving. In this paper we present a
                 study of capitalizing on student awareness for
                 developing their control competence during algorithmic
                 problem solving. We describe the rational for our
                 study, illustrate the learning process through an
                 initial problem solving activity, and show the outcome
                 of this learning.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Chalk:2001:SLV,
  author =       "Peter Chalk",
  title =        "Scaffolding learning in virtual environments",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "85--88",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377492",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "As the use of on-line teaching environments increases,
                 tutors need to identify the tasks, procedures and
                 interventions that enhance the quality of student
                 learning. One theory of instruction in problem solving
                 is scaffolding and this is used as a guide to analysis
                 of actual interventions by the author in a software
                 engineering assignment. Stored models of the students'
                 solutions show various misconceptions and the tutor's
                 comments in each case are shown to belong to one of the
                 six categories listed in the original definition of
                 scaffolding. One possible outcome could be the outline
                 of a possible new instructional design pattern for this
                 method of tutoring.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Rosbottom:2001:HLS,
  author =       "John Rosbottom",
  title =        "Hybrid learning --- a safe route into {Web}-based open
                 and distance learning for the computer science
                 teacher",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "89--92",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377493",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "The hybrid learner is located on a continuum between
                 the traditional student attending face to face classes
                 in a University and the distance learner who may never
                 visit the institution, except perhaps to graduate.
                 Modern methods of web-based open and distance learning
                 make hybrid learning attractive and accessible to
                 students. Computer Science students in particular make
                 very good hybrid students because the content of the
                 Computer Science curriculum has a strong practical
                 element that is conducive to independent learning
                 methods, and because they have a familiarity with the
                 tools used in hybrid learning. Suggestions are given on
                 how a teacher may develop web-based open and distance
                 learning (WEB-ODL) for hybrid learners.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Carbone:2001:CPE,
  author =       "Angela Carbone and John Hurst and Ian Mitchell and
                 Dick Gunstone",
  title =        "Characteristics of programming exercises that lead to
                 poor learning tendencies: {Part II}",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "93--96",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377494",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "In most introductory programming courses tasks are
                 given to students to complete as a crucial part of
                 their study. The tasks are considered important because
                 they require students to apply their knowledge to new
                 situations. However, often the tasks have not been
                 considered as a vehicle that can direct learning
                 behaviours in students. In this paper attention is paid
                 to features of programming tasks that led to the
                 following three poor learning behaviours:
                 non-retrieval, lack of internal reflective thinking and
                 lack of external reflective thinking. The data gathered
                 for this study is provided by students and tutors, and
                 describes the students' engagement in the tasks. The
                 paper concludes with a list of generic improvements
                 that should be considered when formulating programming
                 exercises to minimise poor learning behaviours in
                 students.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Ciesielski:2001:UAS,
  author =       "Vic Ciesielski and Peter McDonald",
  title =        "Using animation of state space algorithms to overcome
                 student learning difficulties",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "97--100",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377495",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "We describe an algorithm animation system for
                 artificial intelligence search algorithms. We have
                 identified a number learning difficulties experienced
                 by students studying search algorithms and designed the
                 animation system to help students to overcome these
                 difficulties. As well as the usual single step mode for
                 assistance in learning the individual steps of an
                 algorithm, the system supports an innovative burst mode
                 for visualising qualitative behaviour and facilitating
                 comparisons between different algorithms and heuristic
                 functions. The system has successfully been used in the
                 classroom for 4 years and survey results indicate use
                 of the system improves understanding. An empirical
                 study comparing a group of 15 students using the
                 animation system and 15 students who wrote programs for
                 the algorithms revealed a generally similar level of
                 understanding, however the animation group was better
                 at dealing with questions about qualitative
                 behaviour.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Khuri:2001:EEV,
  author =       "Sami Khuri and Klaus Holzapfel",
  title =        "{EVEGA}: an educational visualization environment for
                 graph algorithms",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "101--104",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377497",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "This paper describes the package EVEGA (Educational
                 Visualization Environment for Graph Algorithms) and
                 possible ways of incorporating it into the teaching of
                 algorithms. The tool is freely available, platform- and
                 network-independent, and highly interactive. The tool
                 is designed for three different groups of users:
                 students, instructors, and developers. Interaction with
                 EVEGA can be achieved through the exploration of
                 existing default visualizations, through the direct
                 manipulation of graphical objects, or through the
                 implementation and visualization of new algorithms
                 using existing classes.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Karvonen:2001:VCM,
  author =       "Antti Karvonen and Erkki Rautama and Jorma Tarhio and
                 Jari Turkia",
  title =        "Versatile concept map viewing on the {Web}",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "105--108",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377504",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "We present an applet-based system viewing concept maps
                 on the Web. The input consists of a concept map written
                 in a description language with optional style and
                 layout definitions. The system has numerous
                 applications, because many kinds of graphs, trees, and
                 flowcharts written by humans or generated by other
                 software can be shown in addition to traditional
                 concept maps.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Dann:2001:UVT,
  author =       "Wanda Dann and Stephen Cooper and Randy Pausch",
  title =        "Using visualization to teach novices recursion",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "109--112",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377507",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "This paper describes an approach for introducing
                 recursion, as part of a course for novice programmers.
                 The course is designed to make use of a 3-D animation
                 world-builder as a visualization tool that allows
                 students to see their own programs in action. One of
                 the pedagogical goals of the course is to enable the
                 student to gain an intuitive sense of and mathematical
                 insight into the recursive process. The software,
                 examples of animation using recursion, and some
                 experiences in using this approach are discussed.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Kaczmarczyk:2001:ASAa,
  author =       "Lisa C. Kaczmarczyk",
  title =        "Accreditation and student assessment in distance
                 education: why we all need to pay attention",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "113--116",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377659",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Distance Education (D.E.) is changing fundamental
                 debates about academic integrity and rigor. The role of
                 teaching and learning is being discussed with respect
                 to both accreditation and student assessment. Evidence
                 suggests that popular methods of student assessment in
                 D.E. differ little from traditional methods. Studies of
                 cheating in D.E. show that perceptions do not match
                 reality. Accrediting agencies are grappling with an
                 inherent educational paradigm shift. Beliefs about
                 professional autonomy and academic freedom may be
                 affected. Computer Scientists are in a unique position
                 to understand the implications of this
                 technology-driven debate. We need to educate ourselves
                 about these issues and make our voices heard.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Kaczmarczyk:2001:ASAb,
  author =       "Lisa C. Kaczmarczyk",
  title =        "Accreditation and student assessment in distance
                 education (poster session): why we all need to pay
                 attention",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "113--116",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377717",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Distance Education (D.E.) is changing fundamental
                 debates about academic integrity and rigor. The role of
                 teaching and learning is being discussed with respect
                 to both accreditation and student assessment. Evidence
                 suggests that popular methods of student assessment in
                 D.E. differ little from traditional methods. Studies of
                 cheating in D.E. show that perceptions do not match
                 reality. Accrediting agencies are grappling with an
                 inherent educational paradigm shift. Beliefs about
                 professional autonomy and academic freedom may be
                 affected. Computer Scientists are in a unique position
                 to understand the implications of this
                 technology-driven debate. We need to educate ourselves
                 about these issues and make our voices heard.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Thomas:2001:OSS,
  author =       "Pete Thomas and Kit Logan",
  title =        "Observational studies of student errors in a distance
                 learning environment using a remote recording and
                 replay tool",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "117--120",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377661",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "AESOP is An Electronic Student Observatory Project
                 consisting of a set of tools written in Smalltalk
                 allowing student's activities and progress through an
                 on-line distance education course to be remotely
                 recorded, replayed and analysed. The following paper
                 outlines some initial findings from observations made
                 on a cross-sectional group of 368 volunteers taking the
                 course in 2000. Students observed using low resolution
                 640 x 480 screens were noted to take significantly
                 longer to complete on-line course work (p=0.018).
                 Differences between genders were also found with
                 females reporting less comfort at using computers and
                 males using a greater variety of central processing
                 units. Some evidence indicates that female students
                 were also more likely to be using lower specification
                 machines than males although the differences noted were
                 found to be just outside significance levels.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Clear:2001:CIE,
  author =       "Tony Clear and Mats Daniels",
  title =        "A cyber-icebreaker for an effective virtual group?",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "121--124",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377662",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "This paper reports selected results from the most
                 recent of a series of international collaborative
                 trials between students at Auckland University of
                 Technology and Uppsala University. The trials require
                 students to work together in virtual groups, comprising
                 students from each institution, to perform a common
                 task. The topic of this paper is how to form and
                 sustain more effective virtual groups. In this trial a
                 cyber-icebreaker task has been introduced and its
                 contribution to group effectiveness is explored. Some
                 conclusions are drawn pinpointing the strengths and
                 weaknesses of this trial design, and some insights into
                 effective design of electronic collaborative learning
                 groups are gained.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Azadegan:2001:ICP,
  author =       "Shiva Azadegan and Chao Lu",
  title =        "An international common project: implementation
                 phase",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "125--128",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377663",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "To better prepare students to work in globally
                 distributed organizations, to develop effective
                 communication skills to deal with the communication
                 barriers that are inherent in such settings and to
                 provide students with the opportunity to be involved in
                 a complete software development cycle of a
                 ``real-world'' project, from design to integration and
                 testing, we have developed a course based on an
                 ``International Common Project'' (ICP) model [3] of the
                 US-EC (European Community) Consortium ``Towards a
                 Common Computer Science Curriculum and Mutual Degree
                 Recognition'' [1]. The course is scheduled for the
                 Spring Semester, 2001, and Towson University, Maryland,
                 USA and Evry University, France, will participate in
                 this project.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Huizinga:2001:ITI,
  author =       "Dorota M. Huizinga",
  title =        "Identifying topics for instructional improvement
                 through on-line tracking of programming assignments",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "129--132",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377664",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "This paper stresses the need for identifying specific
                 learning objectives for student programming projects
                 and describes the use of an on-line project submission
                 system for assessment of those objectives.
                 Specifically, the emphasis of the article is on on-line
                 tracking of student progress in order to identify
                 topics that need particular instructional attention.
                 The examples and data collected are drawn from a junior
                 level operating system course.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Saikkonen:2001:FAA,
  author =       "Riku Saikkonen and Lauri Malmi and Ari Korhonen",
  title =        "Fully automatic assessment of programming exercises",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "133--136",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377666",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Automatic assessment of programming exercises has
                 become an important method for grading students'
                 exercises and giving feedback for them in mass courses.
                 We describe a system called Scheme-robo, which has been
                 designed for assessing programming exercises written in
                 the functional programming language Scheme. The system
                 assesses individual procedures instead of complete
                 programs. In addition to checking the correctness of
                 students' solutions the system provides many different
                 tools for analysing other things in the program like
                 its structure and running time, and possible
                 plagiarism. The system has been in production use on
                 our introductory programming course with some 300
                 students for two years with good results.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Satratzemi:2001:SPV,
  author =       "Maria Satratzemi and Vassilios Dagdilelis and Georgios
                 Evagelidis",
  title =        "A system for program visualization and problem-solving
                 path assessment of novice programmers",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "137--140",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377667",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "This paper describes an educational programming
                 environment, called AnimPascal. AnimPascal is a program
                 animator that incorporates the ability to record
                 problem-solving paths followed by students. The aim of
                 AnimPascal is to help students understand the phases of
                 developing, verifying, debugging, and executing a
                 program. Also, by recording the different versions of
                 student programs, it can help teachers discover student
                 conceptions about programming. In this paper we
                 describe how our system works and present some
                 empirical results concerning student conceptions when
                 trying to solve a problem of algorithmic or programming
                 nature. Finally, we present our plans for further
                 extensions to our software.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Medley:2001:UQR,
  author =       "M. Dee Medley",
  title =        "Using qualitative research software for {CS} education
                 research",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "141--144",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377668",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Research in Computer Science education has become more
                 and more important in recent years. Both quantitative
                 and qualitative research methods yield interesting
                 results, but most researchers in our field rely on
                 software for only the quantitative methods. This paper
                 describes one of several packages on the market that
                 support qualitative research methods. These packages
                 make qualitative research less unwieldy and provide the
                 researcher with excellent tools for doing far more
                 detailed analysis of the data than is possible by hand.
                 The data for such analysis may come from a variety of
                 sources including on-line or written tests, programming
                 assignments, and exit interviews for assessment
                 purposes. The results of qualitative research can
                 produce a better understanding of the larger picture in
                 the environment under study.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Claypool:2001:OSL,
  author =       "Mark Claypool and David Finkel and Craig Wills",
  title =        "An open source laboratory for operating systems
                 projects",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "145--148",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377669",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Typical undergraduate operating systems projects use
                 services provided by an operating system via system
                 calls or develop code in a simulated operating system.
                 With the increasing popularity of operating systems
                 with open source code such as Linux, there are untapped
                 possibilities for operating systems projects to modify
                 real operating system code. We present the hardware and
                 software configuration of an open source laboratory
                 that promises to provide students that use it with a
                 better understanding of operating system internals than
                 is typically gained in a traditional operating systems
                 course. Our preliminary projects and evaluation suggest
                 that thus far the lab has achieved its primary goal in
                 that students that used the lab feel more knowledgeable
                 in operating systems and more confident in their
                 ability to write and modify operating system code.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Koldehofe:2001:UAI,
  author =       "Boris Koldehofe and Philippas Tsigas",
  title =        "Using actors in an interactive animation in a graduate
                 course on distributed system",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "149--152",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377670",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "We describe and evaluate an experiment where actors
                 were used to simulate the behaviour of processes in a
                 distributed system in order to explain the concept of
                 self-stabilisation in a graduate course on distributed
                 systems. A self-stabilising system is one that ensures
                 that the system's behaviour eventually stabilises to a
                 safe subset of states regardless of the initial state.
                 Protocols satisfying this elegant property, which
                 enables a system to recover from transient failures
                 that can alter the state of the system, are often hard
                 to understand, especially for students that have not
                 studied distributed computing and systems before. The
                 experiment was part of an introductory course on
                 distributed computing and systems for graduates in
                 October 2000. The purpose of this interactive animation
                 was to introduce to the students the basic concepts
                 behind self-stabilisation (eligible states, transient
                 faults, execution convergence) before their formal
                 introduction. All of the students had a degree either
                 in mathematics or computing science and had taken a
                 course on algorithms before. However, most of the
                 students did not have a background in distributed
                 systems or distributed algorithms. The latter was not
                 only the motivation for preparing this method of
                 presentation but also what made this a challenging
                 effort. The feedback from the class was that the
                 concept and this teaching method were very well
                 received. We could observe that their understanding
                 evolved to the point that they were able to
                 successfully come up with ideas for solutions and argue
                 for/prove their correctness. As suggested in [1],
                 dramatisation of executions can help the students to
                 understand new issues and complications. This work
                 shows that this is true even for graduate level
                 courses. In our experiment we could conclude that
                 dramatisation can be almost as powerful as a
                 programming exercise in the teaching process; sometimes
                 even more efficient, especially when we need to teach
                 new concepts to an audience with diverse educational
                 backgrounds. In analysing the results of our method we
                 make a combination of the qualitative and quantitative
                 approaches [4].",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Carniani:2001:NET,
  author =       "Enrico Carniani and Renzo Davoli",
  title =        "The {NetWire} emulator: a tool for teaching and
                 understanding networks",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "153--156",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377671",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "The evolution of the parallel computing theory has
                 shown over years the need for complex and reliable
                 emulation tools for teaching, learning and developing
                 new distributed algorithms in a realistic network
                 environment. NetWire[emu] is a distributed architecture
                 designed for educational and research purposes which
                 provides a synthetic and realistic network environment
                 that may be used to teach and learn parallel algorithms
                 (or parallel operating systems) as well as to research
                 and develop new distributed algorithms. NetWire is an
                 architecture based on a client/server derivation
                 scheme: each client can interact with one or more
                 servers emulating one or more networks by the NOEL
                 protocol (Network Oriented Emulation Language), which
                 is an extension of TCL over TCP/IP specifically
                 designed for NetWire. The user can thus control all the
                 physical parameters of each network or part of it
                 (communication channels, hubs, network adapters and so
                 on).Furthermore, the NetWire API library interfaces the
                 synthetic network environment to real software
                 applications with ease, hiding the whole architecture
                 behind the appearance of a network device driver, fully
                 compatible with the operating system the applications
                 run on. Moreover, NetWire already provides a featured
                 Xwindows interface, and because of the integrated TCL
                 language and the interactions between NOEL and TK, it
                 is possible to fastly build up new and powerful GUI
                 based programs. Thus, the field of application of
                 NetWire is twofold: on a side, it may be used as a tool
                 for teaching distributed algorithms on parallel and
                 distributed operating systems, and on the other one it
                 is a tool for the research and development of new
                 distributed algorithms.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Rickman:2001:ECN,
  author =       "Jon Rickman and Merry McDonald and Gary McDonald and
                 Phillip Heeler",
  title =        "Enhancing the computer networking curriculum",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "157--160",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377672",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "An increasing number of students in computer science
                 are requesting advanced study and active learning
                 experiences in computer networking. Employers need
                 graduates who not only understand the fundamentals of
                 networking but those who can quickly be involved in
                 network administration. Meeting these demands in the
                 curriculum suggests that new and well-planned
                 laboratory and internship experiences should be
                 incorporated into the computer science curriculum.
                 However, there are some major challenges in providing
                 these experiences; it is much more complex than just
                 adding another compiler or server to a laboratory. This
                 paper describes several efforts the authors are making
                 to meet these challenges. The environment in which
                 these efforts have been studied is a small
                 state-supported university, Northwest Missouri State
                 University, in rural Missouri. Northwest has over 6,200
                 students pursuing baccalaureate, masters and specialist
                 degrees. The networking environment at Northwest is
                 more robust than one might expect. In 1987, the
                 University became the first public institution in the
                 United States to develop an ``Electronic Campus''
                 featuring University-provided, networked computing
                 stations located in every residence hall room and
                 faculty office. Then in 1999, each faculty member was
                 issued a personal notebook computer and the residence
                 halls were upgraded to Windows-based, networked desktop
                 computers. [9]",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Gregorio-Rodriguez:2001:EAW,
  author =       "C. Gregorio-Rodr{\'\i}guez and L. Llana-D{\'\i}az and
                 P. Palao-Gostanza and C. Pareja-Flores and R.
                 Mart{\'\i}nez-Unanue and J. {\'A}.
                 Vel{\'a}zquez-Iturbide",
  title =        "{EXercita}: automatic {Web} publishing of programming
                 exercises",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "161--164",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377673",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "EXercita is a system designed to archive and publish
                 programming exercises. It consists of a repository of
                 structured documents, each describing an exercise, and
                 several tools to manage it. Documents are marked-up
                 with an extension of LaTeX we have designed, called
                 eXercita, and can be automatically published as
                 PostScript files or Web pages. In addition, exercises
                 can be automatically published as a hierarchical Web
                 site that mirrors the structure of the repository.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Fone:2001:UFP,
  author =       "William Fone",
  title =        "Using a familiar package to demonstrate a difficult
                 concept: using an excel spreadsheet model to explain
                 the concepts of neural networks to undergraduates",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "165--168",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377675",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "A course introducing neural networks to second year
                 undergraduates with mixed disciplinary backgrounds
                 needed a tool to reduce the overheads of simplifying
                 the complex mathematical and programming skills
                 normally associated with the subject. An Excel model
                 was produced that had the added benefit of reducing
                 anxiety, as all students taking the course are
                 competent with Excel spreadsheets.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Berque:2001:TTC,
  author =       "Dave Berque and David K. Johnson and Larry Jovanovic",
  title =        "Teaching theory of computation using pen-based
                 computers and an electronic whiteboard",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "169--172",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377680",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "This paper describes a Theory of Computation course
                 that was taught in an electronic classroom equipped
                 with a network of pen-based computers, a
                 touch-sensitive electronic whiteboard, and locally
                 written groupware that was designed to enhance the
                 ability of teachers and students to share written
                 information during class. We first describe the
                 technology that was used to support the course, and
                 then provide an overview of the instructor's use of
                 this technology to engage students during class.
                 Finally, we present the students' reaction to the
                 approach.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Carter:2001:GDP,
  author =       "Janet Carter and Tony Jenkins",
  title =        "Gender differences in programming? (poster session)",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "173--173",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377681",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Clear:2001:CER,
  author =       "Tony Clear and Alison Young",
  title =        "Are computing educators and researchers different from
                 the rest? (poster session)",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "173--173",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377682",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Holden:2001:ITP,
  author =       "Jan Holden and Alison Young",
  title =        "Innovative teaching practices in computing education
                 (poster session): the {TLA} project",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "174--174",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377683",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Jenkins:2001:MVX,
  author =       "Tony Jenkins",
  title =        "Motivation = value x expectancy (poster session)",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "174--174",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377684",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Linington:2001:PPE,
  author =       "Janet Linington and Mark Dixon",
  title =        "Picture program execution (poster session)",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "175--175",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377685",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{McCaughey:2001:LTS,
  author =       "Aine McCaughey and Sylvia Alexander",
  title =        "The learning and teaching support network promoting
                 best practice in the information and computer science
                 academic community (poster session)",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "175--175",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377686",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Choi:2001:UIM,
  author =       "Sun-Hea Choi and Sandra Cairncross",
  title =        "Using interactive multimedia for teaching and learning
                 object oriented software design (poster session)",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "176--176",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377687",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{English:2001:JPS,
  author =       "John English",
  title =        "{JEWL} (poster session): {GUI} programming for
                 complete beginners",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "176--176",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377688",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Joyce:2001:PPP,
  author =       "Donald Joyce and Alison Young",
  title =        "The {PASS} project (poster session): group research
                 into parameters affecting student success",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "177--177",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377689",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Thomas:2001:CSS,
  author =       "Pete Thomas",
  title =        "The coach supporting students as they learn to program
                 (poster session)",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "177--177",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377690",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Wilson:2001:LDI,
  author =       "Laura Wilson and Jon Preston and Russell Shackelford",
  title =        "On-line dynamic interviews {(ODIN)} (poster session):
                 a means of overcoming distance in student-teacher
                 relations",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "178--178",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377691",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Blank:2001:CPS,
  author =       "Glenn David Blank and William M. Pottenger and G. Drew
                 Kessler and Martin Herr and Harriet Jaffe and Soma
                 Roy",
  title =        "{CIMEL} (poster session): constructive, collaborative
                 inquiry-based multimedia {E}-learning",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "179--179",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377692",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Cover:2001:IMC,
  author =       "Comfort Fay Cover and Robert D. Campbell and Karl J.
                 Klee",
  title =        "An international model for curriculum adaptation and
                 implementation (poster session)",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "179--179",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377693",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Korhonen:2001:MCA,
  author =       "Ari Korhonen and Lauri Malmi and Riku Saikkonen",
  title =        "Matrix --- concept animation and algorithm simulation
                 system",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "180--180",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377694",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{OConnor:2001:SPI,
  author =       "Rory O'Connor and Gerry Coleman and Maurizio Morisio",
  title =        "Software process improvement education (poster
                 session): a {European} experiment",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "180--180",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377695",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Fowler:2001:WBC,
  author =       "Aliy Fowler",
  title =        "{Web}-based {CALL} using {Prolog} (poster session)",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "181--181",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377697",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Voracek:2001:IMP,
  author =       "Jan Voracek and Nina Kontro-Vesivalo",
  title =        "International {Master}'s program in information
                 processing and telecommunications (poster session)",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "181--181",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377696",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Joyce:2001:EDB,
  author =       "Donald Joyce and Alison Young",
  title =        "Electronic discussion boards (poster session): their
                 use in post graduate computing courses",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "182--182",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377698",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Kosa:2001:XBD,
  author =       "Martha J. Kosa and Mark A. Boshart",
  title =        "{XML} and browser development activities in {CS2}
                 (poster session)",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "182--182",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377699",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Lanari:2001:IPS,
  author =       "David Lanari and Stefano Roccetti",
  title =        "e-{IMC} (poster session): an authoring tool for
                 humanistic teachers aimed to develop and distribute
                 customized instructional courseware",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "183--183",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377700",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Lawhead:2001:ERP,
  author =       "Pamela Lawhead",
  title =        "Events robots and programming using {Legos} in {CS1}
                 (poster session)",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "183--183",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377701",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Abraham:2001:LTP,
  author =       "David Abraham and Liz Crawford and Leanna Lesta and
                 Agathe Merceron and Kalina Yacef",
  title =        "The logic tutor (poster session)",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "184--184",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377703",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Van:2001:FAQ,
  author =       "Huu Le Van and Andrea Trentini",
  title =        "A ``frequently asked questions'' management system
                 that supports voting, built for student evaluation and
                 optimization purposes (poster session)",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "184--184",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377702",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Impagliazzo:2001:RVC,
  author =       "John Impagliazzo",
  title =        "Real and virtual computing museums (poster session)",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "185--185",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377704",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Putnik:2001:ILT,
  author =       "Zoran Putnik",
  title =        "On integration of learning and technology (poster
                 session)",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "185--185",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377705",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Shi:2001:SIC,
  author =       "Hongchi Shi and Yi Shang and Su-Shing Chen",
  title =        "Smart instructional component based course content
                 organization and delivery (poster session)",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "186--186",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377706",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Xizhe:2001:ETS,
  author =       "Jin Xizhe",
  title =        "Evaluation technique of software configuration
                 management (poster session)",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "186--186",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377707",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Velazquez-Iturbide:2001:FPA,
  author =       "J. {\'A}. Vel{\'a}zquez-Iturbide",
  title =        "A first problem for the algorithms course (poster
                 session)",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "187--187",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377708",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "I present a problem to be used in the first class of
                 the algorithms course as an introduction to the topic.
                 Two algorithms are given, simple but rich enough to
                 illustrate several issues.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Cassel:2001:RSP,
  author =       "Lillian N. Cassel",
  title =        "Reading summaries (poster session): relating class to
                 student's problems with the current reading
                 assignment",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "188--188",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377709",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Laxer:2001:TCS,
  author =       "Cary Laxer",
  title =        "Treating computer science as science as: an experiment
                 with sorting (poster session)",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "189--189",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377710",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "When I teach sorting algorithms in our introductory
                 computer science class, I always wonder how I can
                 convince the students of the efficiency of $ \Omega (n
                 \log n) $ sorts, and their complex code, vs. the ease
                 of writing $ \Omega (n^2) $ sorts. With today's
                 personal computers, even bubble sorting an array of a
                 few thousand items appears to occur instantaneously. In
                 addition, most textbooks provide the program code for
                 implementing most of the standard sorting algorithms,
                 such as bubble sort, selection sort, and quick sort.
                 Since our introductory course has a closed lab period
                 each week, I looked for something to do with my
                 students when it came to sorting. Making them type in
                 the code that was in the book seemed a waste of time.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Joyce:2001:SEM,
  author =       "Daniel Joyce",
  title =        "Sneaking in extra material (panel session)",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "190--190",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377711",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Did you ever wish you could sneak some extra material
                 into a course but it just doesn't fit with the syllabus
                 and there's not enough time to add another unit to an
                 already crowded calendar? In this Tips and Techniques I
                 described how I snuck some computing history into an
                 introductory programming course.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Koppelman:2001:TAE,
  author =       "Herman Koppelman",
  title =        "Teaching abstraction explicitly (poster session)",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "191--191",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377712",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "When one has to learn programming one has to learn a
                 programming language, but also the concept of
                 abstraction. Learning abstraction is not a logical
                 consequence of learning a programming language.
                 Moreover, it can be doubted whether novice programmers
                 naturally tend to use abstraction. So, our approach is
                 to teach abstraction explicitly to novices. We show
                 that even for simple problems it makes sense to look
                 for levels of abstraction in the problem definition and
                 subsequently to design programs that reflect explicitly
                 those levels of abstraction. We will discuss the way it
                 works on the basis of a simple example.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Barros:2001:UPN,
  author =       "Jo{\~a}o Paulo Barros",
  title =        "Use {Petri} nets to improve your concurrent
                 programming course (poster session)",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "192--192",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377713",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "Petri nets are recommended as a learning aid in a
                 concurrent programming course covering modelling and
                 verification techniques, based on state space analysis,
                 and translation of formal models to Java programs.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Sooriamurthi:2001:PJE,
  author =       "Raja Sooriamurthi",
  title =        "Prelude to the {Java} event model (poster session)",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "193--193",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377714",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Rasala:2001:ERH,
  author =       "Richard Rasala",
  title =        "Exploring recursion in {Hilbert} curves (poster
                 session)",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "194--194",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377715",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  abstract =     "This tip will describe the use of a graphical tool to
                 explore the recursive Hilbert curves and will explain
                 some of the mathematical information that can be
                 visualized using this tool.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Grissom:2001:RCP,
  author =       "Scott Grissom",
  title =        "Reality check (poster session): an informal feedback
                 tool",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "195--195",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/507758.377716",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:50 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Martin:2001:PSI,
  author =       "C. Dianne Martin",
  title =        "{PKAL} summer institute 2001: just-in-time computer
                 education for the 21st century",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "5--6",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/572139.572141",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:51 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "DBLP;
                 http://dblp.uni-trier.de/db/journals/sigcse/sigcse33.html#Martin01a;
                 http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  URL =          "ftp://ftp.math.utah.edu/pub/mirrors/ftp.ira.uka.de/bibliography/Misc/DBLP/2001.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Gotterbarn:2001:ASW,
  author =       "Don Gotterbarn",
  title =        "Antipodal shock: watch your language!",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "7--8",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/572139.572142",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:51 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "DBLP;
                 http://dblp.uni-trier.de/db/journals/sigcse/sigcse33.html#Gotterbarn01;
                 http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  URL =          "ftp://ftp.math.utah.edu/pub/mirrors/ftp.ira.uka.de/bibliography/Misc/DBLP/2001.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Clear:2001:PLN,
  author =       "Tony Clear",
  title =        "``Programming in the Large'' and the need for
                 professional discrimination",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "9--10",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/572139.572144",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:51 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "DBLP;
                 http://dblp.uni-trier.de/db/journals/sigcse/sigcse33.html#Clear01a;
                 http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  URL =          "ftp://ftp.math.utah.edu/pub/mirrors/ftp.ira.uka.de/bibliography/Misc/DBLP/2001.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Gorgone:2001:ICC,
  author =       "John T. Gorgone",
  title =        "The {IS2001} curriculum in {CC2001} computing
                 compendium",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "11--12",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/572139.572146",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:51 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "DBLP;
                 http://dblp.uni-trier.de/db/journals/sigcse/sigcse33.html#Gorgone01a;
                 http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  URL =          "ftp://ftp.math.utah.edu/pub/mirrors/ftp.ira.uka.de/bibliography/Misc/DBLP/2001.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Hartman:2001:CFC,
  author =       "Janet Hartman",
  title =        "The changing face of computing accreditation",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "13--14",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/572139.572148",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:51 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "DBLP;
                 http://dblp.uni-trier.de/db/journals/sigcse/sigcse33.html#Hartman01;
                 http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  URL =          "ftp://ftp.math.utah.edu/pub/mirrors/ftp.ira.uka.de/bibliography/Misc/DBLP/2001.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{McCauley:2001:ADM,
  author =       "Ren{\'e}e McCauley",
  title =        "Agile development methods poised to upset status quo",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "14--15",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/572139.572150",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:51 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "DBLP;
                 http://dblp.uni-trier.de/db/journals/sigcse/sigcse33.html#McCauley01a;
                 http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  URL =          "ftp://ftp.math.utah.edu/pub/mirrors/ftp.ira.uka.de/bibliography/Misc/DBLP/2001.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Walker:2001:TSD,
  author =       "Henry MacKay Walker",
  title =        "Teaching and a sense of the dramatic",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "16--17",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/572139.572152",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:51 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "DBLP;
                 http://dblp.uni-trier.de/db/journals/sigcse/sigcse33.html#Walker01a;
                 http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  URL =          "ftp://ftp.math.utah.edu/pub/mirrors/ftp.ira.uka.de/bibliography/Misc/DBLP/2001.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Gersting:2001:ITE,
  author =       "Judith L. Gersting and Frank H. Young",
  title =        "Improving the team experience",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "18--19",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/572139.572154",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:51 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "DBLP;
                 http://dblp.uni-trier.de/db/journals/sigcse/sigcse33.html#GerstingY01a;
                 http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  URL =          "ftp://ftp.math.utah.edu/pub/mirrors/ftp.ira.uka.de/bibliography/Misc/DBLP/2001.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Ginat:2001:CP,
  author =       "David Ginat",
  title =        "Chain of permutations",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "20--21",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/572139.572156",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:51 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "DBLP;
                 http://dblp.uni-trier.de/db/journals/sigcse/sigcse33.html#Ginat01a;
                 http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  URL =          "ftp://ftp.math.utah.edu/pub/mirrors/ftp.ira.uka.de/bibliography/Misc/DBLP/2001.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Davies:2001:UDE,
  author =       "Gordon Davies",
  title =        "{USC}'s distance education network {(DEN)}",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "22--23",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/572139.572158",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:51 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "DBLP;
                 http://dblp.uni-trier.de/db/journals/sigcse/sigcse33.html#Davies01a;
                 http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  URL =          "ftp://ftp.math.utah.edu/pub/mirrors/ftp.ira.uka.de/bibliography/Misc/DBLP/2001.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Campbell:2001:TYC,
  author =       "Robert D. Campbell",
  title =        "Two-year college education committee update",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "24--25",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/572139.572160",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:51 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "DBLP;
                 http://dblp.uni-trier.de/db/journals/sigcse/sigcse33.html#Campbell01;
                 http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  URL =          "ftp://ftp.math.utah.edu/pub/mirrors/ftp.ira.uka.de/bibliography/Misc/DBLP/2001.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Parlante:2001:NAT,
  author =       "Nick Parlante",
  title =        "Nifty assignments: {Tetris} on the brain",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "25--27",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/572139.572162",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:51 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "DBLP;
                 http://dblp.uni-trier.de/db/journals/sigcse/sigcse33.html#Parlante01;
                 http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  URL =          "ftp://ftp.math.utah.edu/pub/mirrors/ftp.ira.uka.de/bibliography/Misc/DBLP/2001.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Ginat:2001:STR,
  author =       "David Ginat",
  title =        "Starting top-down, refining bottom-up, sharpening by
                 zoom-in",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "28--31",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/572139.572164",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:51 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "DBLP;
                 http://dblp.uni-trier.de/db/journals/sigcse/sigcse33.html#Ginat01b;
                 http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  URL =          "ftp://ftp.math.utah.edu/pub/mirrors/ftp.ira.uka.de/bibliography/Misc/DBLP/2001.bib",
  abstract =     "We illustrate with colorful algorithmic problems two
                 solution processes that embed three primary computer
                 science problem-solving approaches. The first, Top-Down
                 approach is rather naturally invoked for formulating
                 elegant, though inefficient divide-and-conquer rules.
                 The second, Bottom-Up approach is utilized to
                 considerably improve efficiency of the Top-Down
                 solution. The third, Zoom-In approach sharply captures
                 the precise essence of the problem characteristics and
                 yields remarkably concise solutions.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Walker:2001:NAJ,
  author =       "Henry Walker",
  title =        "Notes on the academic job market and hiring
                 strategies",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "32--34",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/572139.572165",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:51 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "DBLP;
                 http://dblp.uni-trier.de/db/journals/sigcse/sigcse33.html#Walker01b;
                 http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  URL =          "ftp://ftp.math.utah.edu/pub/mirrors/ftp.ira.uka.de/bibliography/Misc/DBLP/2001.bib",
  abstract =     "Today's tight job market challenges colleges and
                 universities in hiring. This article reviews the
                 current job market and suggests strategies for a
                 successful hiring effort.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Jacobson:2001:MNS,
  author =       "Norman Jacobson",
  title =        "A method for normalizing students' scores when
                 employing multiple graders",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "35--38",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/572139.572166",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:51 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "DBLP;
                 http://dblp.uni-trier.de/db/journals/sigcse/sigcse33.html#Jacobson01;
                 http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  URL =          "ftp://ftp.math.utah.edu/pub/mirrors/ftp.ira.uka.de/bibliography/Misc/DBLP/2001.bib",
  abstract =     "Teachers of large classes often employ multiple
                 graders to score student work. Even when appropriate
                 measures are taken to insure that scoring by different
                 graders is consistent, inconsistencies nevertheless
                 occur. To adjust for them, instructors sometimes
                 normalize grades mathematically, typically by scaling
                 each grader group's score to an average of points
                 earned. Scaling to an average has undesirable traits,
                 including the difficulty of convincing students that it
                 is fair. We developed an easy-to-explain method that
                 adjusts scores so that the average number of points
                 lost by students in each grader's group is the same. We
                 discuss how to compute the adjustment and its
                 advantages and limitations.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Renaud:2001:TPD,
  author =       "Karen Renaud and John Barrow and Petra le Roux",
  title =        "Teaching programming from a distance: problems and a
                 proposed solution",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "39--42",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/572139.572167",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:51 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "DBLP;
                 http://dblp.uni-trier.de/db/journals/sigcse/sigcse33.html#RenaudBR01;
                 http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  URL =          "ftp://ftp.math.utah.edu/pub/mirrors/ftp.ira.uka.de/bibliography/Misc/DBLP/2001.bib",
  abstract =     "Teaching programming is never a simple task. It is a
                 dynamic process and the curriculum often evolves from
                 one year to the next. Teaching programming at a
                 distance-education institution is especially
                 challenging. This paper reports on the process of
                 curriculum planning at the computer science department
                 of a distance-education institution. We address generic
                 issues related to teaching programming and specific
                 problems encountered when teaching at a distance. The
                 paper outlines and motivates our proposed strategy,
                 which encompasses three years of undergraduate
                 teaching.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Reis:2001:AEF,
  author =       "Rog{\'e}rio Reis and Nelma Moreira",
  title =        "{Apoo}: an environment for a first course in assembly
                 language programming",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "43--47",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/572139.572168",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:51 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "DBLP;
                 http://dblp.uni-trier.de/db/journals/sigcse/sigcse33.html#ReisM01;
                 http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  URL =          "ftp://ftp.math.utah.edu/pub/mirrors/ftp.ira.uka.de/bibliography/Misc/DBLP/2001.bib",
  abstract =     "Teaching the very basic concepts of a computer
                 architecture, instruction set and operation, based on a
                 real micro-processor is usually an unfruitful task as
                 the essential notions are obscured by the specific
                 details of its architecture. A machine emulator has the
                 benefit of providing a portable environment that can
                 run in several platforms and that can be easily adapted
                 for pedagogical purposes. In this work we present an
                 environment for a first course in assembly language
                 programming that aims to be a flexible and effective
                 pedagogical tool.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Chung:2001:NAH,
  author =       "Sei-Jong Chung",
  title =        "Network architecture: {Hamming} codes and cyclic
                 redundancy for transmission error correction",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "48--50",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/572139.572169",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:51 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "DBLP;
                 http://dblp.uni-trier.de/db/journals/sigcse/sigcse33.html#Chung01;
                 http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  URL =          "ftp://ftp.math.utah.edu/pub/mirrors/ftp.ira.uka.de/bibliography/Misc/DBLP/2001.bib",
  abstract =     "In this paper, we examine how detect and correct
                 transmission errors transmission control protocols such
                 as TCP. We will first show how to construct Hamming
                 Codes to detect and correct single-bit transmission
                 errors. Then, we will evaluate various aspects of the
                 Cyclic Redundancy Check (CRC) codes in comparison to
                 Hamming Codes. The efficiency and the ease with which
                 we can build and implement CRC codes are some of the
                 aspects of the CRC codes that this paper explores.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Ryan:2001:HCI,
  author =       "Christopher D. Ryan",
  title =        "The human-computer interface: challenges for
                 educational multimedia and {Web} designers",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "51--54",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/572139.572170",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:51 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "DBLP;
                 http://dblp.uni-trier.de/db/journals/sigcse/sigcse33.html#Ryan01;
                 http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  URL =          "ftp://ftp.math.utah.edu/pub/mirrors/ftp.ira.uka.de/bibliography/Misc/DBLP/2001.bib",
  abstract =     "Designers often treat interface and navigation as
                 afterthoughts in educational multimedia and web design,
                 to the detriment of their prospective learners. A
                 review of the literature provides clues to designing a
                 more usable interface and navigation structure that
                 both aides and engages learners. A look at the past and
                 future of interface design allows designers to glean
                 valuable information and ideas for improving the
                 usability, as well as the educational value, of their
                 products. Concentrating on simplicity and consistency,
                 and keeping flashy design and color to a minimum,
                 designers can create attractive products that promote
                 learning.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Hazzan:2001:PCS,
  author =       "Orit Hazzan",
  title =        "On the presentation of computer science problems",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "55--58",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/572139.572171",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:51 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "DBLP;
                 http://dblp.uni-trier.de/db/journals/sigcse/sigcse33.html#Hazzan01;
                 http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  URL =          "ftp://ftp.math.utah.edu/pub/mirrors/ftp.ira.uka.de/bibliography/Misc/DBLP/2001.bib",
  abstract =     "This paper suggests an alternative way for presenting
                 theorems to students. The discussion focuses on
                 theorems that indicate the existence (or in existence)
                 of some object. Instead of presenting a given theorem
                 as it is, it is suggested to reformulate the theorem as
                 a (sometimes unsolvable) construction task. Students
                 trials to solve the construction problem, lead them to
                 discover the theorem by themselves.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Ariga:2001:PSI,
  author =       "Taeko Ariga and Hideki Tsuiki",
  title =        "Programming for students of information design",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "59--63",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/572139.572172",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:51 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "DBLP;
                 http://dblp.uni-trier.de/db/journals/sigcse/sigcse33.html#ArigaT01;
                 http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  URL =          "ftp://ftp.math.utah.edu/pub/mirrors/ftp.ira.uka.de/bibliography/Misc/DBLP/2001.bib",
  abstract =     "Programming is one of the subjects which students of
                 information design need to study. Programming training
                 will improve their multimedia representation, even when
                 they use software packages. It will also enlarge the
                 possibility of new interactive multimedia art over the
                 internet. We propose course materials to teach
                 programming by Java, which have been applied to a
                 programming course in the Department of Information
                 Design.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Warms:2001:TEC,
  author =       "Tom M. Warms",
  title =        "Tracing the execution of {C++} programs",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "64--67",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/572139.572173",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:51 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "DBLP;
                 http://dblp.uni-trier.de/db/journals/sigcse/sigcse33.html#Warms01;
                 http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  URL =          "ftp://ftp.math.utah.edu/pub/mirrors/ftp.ira.uka.de/bibliography/Misc/DBLP/2001.bib",
  abstract =     "One of the difficulties faced by instructors of
                 introductory courses in computer science is explaining
                 the intricacies of recursion. This article describes a
                 method devised by the author that enables students to
                 follow and understand the step-by-step execution of
                 many basic programs, including recursive programs.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Lang:2001:OOP,
  author =       "Joseph E. Lang and Brian R. Bogovich and Sean C. Barry
                 and Brian G. Durkin and Michael R. Katchmar and
                 Jonathan H. Kelly and J. Michael McCollum and Michael
                 Potts",
  title =        "Object-oriented programming and design patterns",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "68--70",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/572139.572174",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:51 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "DBLP;
                 http://dblp.uni-trier.de/db/journals/sigcse/sigcse33.html#LangBBDKKMP01;
                 http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  URL =          "ftp://ftp.math.utah.edu/pub/mirrors/ftp.ira.uka.de/bibliography/Misc/DBLP/2001.bib",
  abstract =     "When teaching object-oriented concepts, design
                 patterns are usually left until the end or left out
                 entirely. In this paper, design patterns are related to
                 the rules of object-oriented design, strongly
                 suggesting that these two concepts should be taught
                 together as beneficial for the understanding of both.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Suraweera:2001:GMA,
  author =       "Francis Suraweera",
  title =        "Getting the most from an algorithms design course: a
                 personal experience",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "71--74",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/572139.572175",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:51 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "DBLP;
                 http://dblp.uni-trier.de/db/journals/sigcse/sigcse33.html#Suraweera01;
                 http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  URL =          "ftp://ftp.math.utah.edu/pub/mirrors/ftp.ira.uka.de/bibliography/Misc/DBLP/2001.bib",
  abstract =     "The most significant goal of an algorithm design
                 course is to prepare students to solve general problems
                 that they will encounter later in their lives.
                 Departments usually offer such courses at the upper
                 undergraduate and graduate levels. Today, compared to
                 three decades ago, we have numerous texts on this and
                 similar courses. The authors of these textbooks suggest
                 different ways to organize their material to suit a
                 variety of audiences. This paper deals with the
                 following. How can we ensure that our students will
                 acquire the necessary skills and abilities to solve
                 general problems? We do this by tying the assessments
                 to the objectives and aims of the course. We list some
                 of the most desirable outcomes for this course, suggest
                 possible ways to assess them based on our experience,
                 and do assessments in a way to foster the confidence
                 they need to handle general problems.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Mulder:2001:IUI,
  author =       "Fred Mulder and Tom J. van Weert",
  title =        "{IFIP\slash UNESCO}'s {Informatics Curriculum
                 Framework 2000} for higher education",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "75--83",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/572139.572177",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:51 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "DBLP;
                 http://dblp.uni-trier.de/db/journals/sigcse/sigcse33.html#MulderW01;
                 http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  URL =          "ftp://ftp.math.utah.edu/pub/mirrors/ftp.ira.uka.de/bibliography/Misc/DBLP/2001.bib",
  abstract =     "Informatics is a relatively new discipline, nowadays
                 of key importance in all economic processes. Many
                 professionals are needed with different informatics
                 backgrounds. The Informatics Curriculum Framework 2000
                 (ICF-2000) has been designed to cope with a large
                 diversity in demands for informatics education in a
                 controlled way. It offers 8 different curriculum
                 specifications that fit 8 professional role categories.
                 It supports systematic and controlled educational
                 policies in which educational informatics programmes
                 can be developed in a cost-effective way, if need be
                 from scratch. Learning materials can be developed in
                 the local cultural tradition. ICF-2000 has many source
                 links to model informatics curricula from leading
                 professional informatics societies. Through this
                 mechanism ICF-2000 can be easily kept up to date.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Clear:2001:RIC,
  author =       "Tony Clear and Michael Goldweber and Frank H. Young
                 and Paul M. Leidig and Kirk Scott",
  title =        "Resources for instructors of capstone courses in
                 computing",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "93--113",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/572139.572179",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:51 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "DBLP;
                 http://dblp.uni-trier.de/db/journals/sigcse/sigcse33.html#ClearGYLS01;
                 http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  URL =          "ftp://ftp.math.utah.edu/pub/mirrors/ftp.ira.uka.de/bibliography/Misc/DBLP/2001.bib",
  abstract =     "Most computing programs now have some form of
                 integrative or capstone course in which students
                 undertake a significant project under supervision.
                 There are many different models for such courses and
                 conducting these courses is a complex task. This report
                 is intended to assist instructors of capstone courses,
                 particularly those new to the model of teaching and
                 learning inherent in the capstone course. This paper
                 discusses important issues that must be addressed when
                 conducting capstone courses. These issues are addressed
                 through a series of questions, with answers reflecting
                 the way that different institutions have chosen to
                 handle them, and commentary on the impact of these
                 different choices. These questions include: Goals of
                 the Course; Characteristics of Projects; Project
                 Deliverables; Sponsors; Teams; Prerequisites and
                 Preparation; Grading and Assessment; Administration and
                 Supervision; and Reflection, Analysis and Review.
                 Subsequently we present information about the companion
                 Web site, intended as an active repository of best
                 practice for instructors of capstone projects. The Web
                 site will have examples of information about capstone
                 courses and materials used by instructors. Readers are
                 invited to contribute content to this site. The paper
                 concludes with a bibliography of additional reference
                 material and resources.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Henderson:2001:SMT,
  author =       "Peter B. Henderson and Doug Baldwin and Venu Dasigi
                 and Marcel Dupras and Jane Fritz and David Ginat and
                 Don Goelman and John Hamer and Lew Hitchner and Will
                 Lloyd and Bill {Marion, Jr.} and Charles Riedesel and
                 Henry Walker",
  title =        "Striving for mathematical thinking",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "114--124",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/572139.572180",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:51 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "DBLP;
                 http://dblp.uni-trier.de/db/journals/sigcse/sigcse33.html#HendersonBDDFGGHHLMMRW01;
                 http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  URL =          "ftp://ftp.math.utah.edu/pub/mirrors/ftp.ira.uka.de/bibliography/Misc/DBLP/2001.bib",
  abstract =     "Computer science and software engineering are young,
                 maturing disciplines. As with other mathematically
                 based disciplines, such as the natural sciences,
                 economics, and engineering, it takes time for the
                 mathematical roots to grow and flourish. For computer
                 science and software engineering, others have planted
                 these seeds over many years, and it is our duty to
                 nurture them. This working group is dedicated to
                 promoting mathematics as an important tool for
                 problem-solving and conceptual understanding in
                 computing.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{McCracken:2001:MMI,
  author =       "M. McCracken and V. Almstrum and D. Diaz and M.
                 Guzdial and D. Hagan and Y. B.-D. Kolikant and C. Laxer
                 and L. Thomas and I. Utting and T. Wilusz",
  title =        "A multinational, multi-institutional study of
                 assessment of programming skills of first-year {CS}
                 students",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "125--140",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 10:29:15 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  URL =          "ftp://ftp.math.utah.edu/pub/mirrors/ftp.ira.uka.de/bibliography/Techreports/UKent.bib;
                 http://www.cs.kent.ac.uk/pubs/2001/1365",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
  submission-id = "17329_1019825612",
}

@Article{McCracken:2001:MNM,
  author =       "Michael McCracken and Vicki L. Almstrum and Danny Diaz
                 and Mark Guzdial and Dianne Hagan and Yifat Ben-David
                 Kolikant and Cary Laxer and Lynda Thomas and Ian Utting
                 and Tadeusz Wilusz",
  title =        "A multi-national, multi-institutional study of
                 assessment of programming skills of first-year {CS}
                 students",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "33",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "125--180",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2001",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/572139.572181",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:51 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "DBLP;
                 http://dblp.uni-trier.de/db/journals/sigcse/sigcse33.html#McCrackenADGHKLTUW01;
                 http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  URL =          "ftp://ftp.math.utah.edu/pub/mirrors/ftp.ira.uka.de/bibliography/Misc/DBLP/2001.bib",
  abstract =     "In computer science, an expected outcome of a
                 student's education is programming skill. This working
                 group investigated the programming competency students
                 have as they complete their first one or two courses in
                 computer science. In order to explore options for
                 assessing students, the working group developed a trial
                 assessment of whether students can program. The
                 underlying goal of this work was to initiate dialog in
                 the Computer Science community on how to develop these
                 types of assessments. Several universities participated
                 in our trial assessment and the disappointing results
                 suggest that many students do not know how to program
                 at the conclusion of their introductory courses. For a
                 combined sample of 216 students from four universities,
                 the average score was 22.89 out of 110 points on the
                 general evaluation criteria developed for this study.
                 From this trial assessment we developed a framework of
                 expectations for first-year courses and suggestions for
                 further work to develop more comprehensive
                 assessments.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Ginat:2002:AIP,
  author =       "David Ginat",
  title =        "Aha! an illuminating perspective",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "34",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "1--2",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2002",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/563517.563342",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:52 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  note =         "Inroads: paving the way towards excellence in
                 computing education.",
  abstract =     "The 'Aha!' phenomenon is familiar to us in many
                 domains including computer science and mathematics
                 (e.g., [2,3,6]). It often stems from an unexpected
                 point of view that illuminates an appealing solution
                 path. The 'Aha' reaction is common to all. Its
                 occurrence is related to the problem-solvers' common
                 perspectives and solution repertoires. Whether more
                 frequent or less frequent, 'Aha' occurrences enrich and
                 strengthen perspectives and repertoires in a
                 stimulating manner. Consider the following Ladder
                 Problem: calculate the number of different ways to
                 climb an N-stage ladder when each step is either one or
                 two stages. One solution perspective may be 'forward
                 reasoning', leading to a systematic accumulation of the
                 possible climbing paths. Another perspective may be
                 combinatorial, leading to the calculation of all the
                 combinations of 1 and 2 that sum to N. A third
                 perspective may be 'backward reasoning', yielding
                 recursive decomposition of the N$^{th}$ case into the
                 N-1 and N-2 cases. Some problem-solvers may fairly
                 quickly invoke the third perspective and elegantly
                 obtain the N$^{th}$ Fibonacci number. Others may first
                 follow one of the other perspectives and later realize
                 the illuminating third perspective. The 'Aha' reactions
                 among the solvers may vary. However, both less
                 experienced and more experienced solvers will gain from
                 recognizing the relevance and elegance of the recursive
                 decomposition and enhance their problem-solving
                 repertoires.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Vidal:2002:URT,
  author =       "Jos{\'e} M. Vidal and Paul Buhler",
  title =        "Using {RoboCup} to teach multiagent systems and the
                 distributed mindset",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "34",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "3--7",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2002",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/563517.563344",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:52 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  note =         "Inroads: paving the way towards excellence in
                 computing education.",
  abstract =     "We present our experiences using the RoboCup
                 soccerserver simulator and Biter, our own agent
                 platform, for the teaching of a graduate multiagent
                 systems' class. The RoboCup simulator and Biter are
                 both described. We argue that the combination of
                 RoboCup and Biter forms an effective platform for the
                 teaching of multiagent systems and the distributed
                 mindset. Results from two semesters using these tools
                 are presented. These results confirm our claims.
                 Finally, we characterize this work within the framework
                 provided by the STEELMAN Draft of the Computing
                 Curricula 2001 initiative.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Klassner:2002:CSL,
  author =       "Frank Klassner",
  title =        "A case study of {LEGO Mindstorms\TM} suitability for
                 artificial intelligence and robotics courses at the
                 college level",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "34",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "8--12",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2002",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/563517.563345",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:52 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  note =         "Inroads: paving the way towards excellence in
                 computing education.",
  abstract =     "This paper examines LEGO Mindstorms{\TM} suitability
                 as a hardware platform for integrating robotics into an
                 Artificial Intelligence course organized around the
                 agent paradigm popularized by Russell and Norvig. This
                 evaluation discusses how kits and projects based on
                 Mindstorms supported students' exploration of the
                 issues behind the design of agents from three classes
                 in Russell and Norvig's intelligent agent taxonomy. The
                 paper's investigation also examines several
                 popularly-perceived limitations of the Mindstorms
                 package for college-level robotics projects and shows
                 that most of these ``limitations'' are not serious
                 impediments to Mindstorms' use, while certain other of
                 these ``limitations'' do indeed present challenges to
                 the platform's use.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Gallagher:2002:WAR,
  author =       "John C. Gallagher and Steven Perretta",
  title =        "{WWW} autonomous robotics: enabling wide area access
                 to a computer engineering practicum",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "34",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "13--17",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2002",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/563517.563346",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:52 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  note =         "Inroads: paving the way towards excellence in
                 computing education.",
  abstract =     "In recent years, courses in the design and programming
                 of mobile autonomous robots have become popular at a
                 number of institutions. These activities offer
                 participants experience in a number of practical areas,
                 including computer programming, project management, and
                 technical writing. Further, they provide those
                 experiences in an entertaining manner that may motivate
                 students to pursue additional education in computer
                 science and engineering. By their nature, however,
                 these classes are resource intensive, often limiting
                 access to a few, fortunate students. This paper
                 describes efforts to date in providing a World Wide Web
                 (WWW) based course in autonomous robotics. We will
                 begin with a discussion of how the unique benefits of
                 autonomous robotics courses are enhanced by offering
                 them via the web. We will then discuss our WWW course
                 and some special challenges we encountered during its
                 development. We will conclude with a discussion of
                 future plans and a set of open questions we intend to
                 address.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Noyes:2002:FCC,
  author =       "James L. Noyes",
  title =        "A first course in computational science: (why a math
                 book isn't enough)",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "34",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "18--22",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2002",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/563517.563348",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:52 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  note =         "Inroads: paving the way towards excellence in
                 computing education.",
  abstract =     "There is a change underway in the CS curriculum that
                 reflects a renewed emphasis upon solving applications.
                 Computational science applies solution methods to
                 various scientific models. However, following a
                 computational science approach means more than just
                 using formulas out of a math book. It means having a
                 scientific mindset, understanding and using a
                 scientific approach, thoroughly testing both the
                 theoretical models and the specific implementation of
                 these models, knowing when to use analytic methods
                 instead of numerical ones, using graphics to improve
                 understanding, and knowing how to explain the results
                 of these models to others. This paper addresses what
                 has been learned in designing and teaching a first
                 course in computational science at the undergraduate
                 level.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Micco:2002:BCL,
  author =       "Mary Micco and Hart Rossman",
  title =        "Building a cyberwar lab: lessons learned: teaching
                 cybersecurity principles to undergraduates",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "34",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "23--27",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2002",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/563517.563349",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:52 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  note =         "Inroads: paving the way towards excellence in
                 computing education.",
  abstract =     "With funding from NSF the Department has set up a
                 stand alone lab for students to learn penetration
                 testing techniques (attack), to harden their networks
                 against these attacks (defense) , and also to gather
                 enough evidence to through careful logging and audit
                 controls to convict a hacker (convict). Linux RedHat
                 7.1 was used and all the machines were set up as
                 standalone servers in three different subdomains, with
                 2 perimeter routers and 2 firewalls to allow
                 experimentation with various configurations. In all
                 over 50 software tools were downloaded and tested.
                 Students were screened and asked to sign a disclaimer.
                 They should also have been required to have networking
                 experience. An initial mistake was to run a very
                 minimal server with no services and practically no
                 users. This was not realistic. It made it quick to
                 rebuild systems but much harder to attack. The attacks
                 need to be carefully planned and structured in a
                 specific sequence one at a time, otherwise it becomes
                 very difficult to follow what is going on.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Vasiga:2002:WCA,
  author =       "Troy Vasiga",
  title =        "What comes after {CS} 1 + 2: a deep breadth before
                 specializing",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "34",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "28--32",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2002",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/563517.563350",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:52 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  note =         "Inroads: paving the way towards excellence in
                 computing education.",
  abstract =     "There has been much discussion of CS1 and CS2 in
                 computer science education circles. This paper presents
                 a proposal for a course subsequent to CS2 that acts as
                 a ``springboard'' for students diving into more
                 specialized Computer Science courses at the upper year
                 levels.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Thomas:2002:LSP,
  author =       "Lynda Thomas and Mark Ratcliffe and John Woodbury and
                 Emma Jarman",
  title =        "Learning styles and performance in the introductory
                 programming sequence",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "34",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "33--37",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2002",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/563517.563352",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:52 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  note =         "Inroads: paving the way towards excellence in
                 computing education.",
  abstract =     "This paper reports on the implication of different
                 preferred learning styles on students' performance in
                 the introductory programming sequence and on work in
                 progress on how to accommodate these different styles.
                 Students were given a learning styles preference test
                 and then their preferred learning styles were compared
                 to their performance on the exam and the practical
                 programming part of the introductory programming
                 module. There were significant differences in
                 performance between groups of students. This result
                 could lead one to two possible conclusions. One might
                 be that some students' learning styles are more suited
                 to learning programming than others. An alternative
                 explanation is that our current methods of teaching
                 advantage students with certain learning preference
                 styles. We are at present in the process of testing
                 this second assumption by providing students with a
                 wider range of learning materials. We will then see if
                 student performance is improved by using our current
                 results as a baseline for comparison",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{McDowell:2002:EPP,
  author =       "Charlie McDowell and Linda Werner and Heather Bullock
                 and Julian Fernald",
  title =        "The effects of pair-programming on performance in an
                 introductory programming course",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "34",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "38--42",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2002",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/563517.563353",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:52 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  note =         "Inroads: paving the way towards excellence in
                 computing education.",
  abstract =     "The purpose of this study was to investigate the
                 effects of pair-programming on student performance in
                 an introductory programming class. Data was collected
                 from approximately 600 students who either completed
                 programming assignments with a partner or programmed
                 independently. Students who programmed in pairs
                 produced better programs, completed the course at
                 higher rates, and performed about as well on the final
                 exam as students who programmed independently. Our
                 findings suggest that collaboration is an effective
                 pedagogical tool for teaching introductory
                 programming.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Barker:2002:DCC,
  author =       "Lecia Jane Barker and Kathy Garvin-Doxas and Michele
                 Jackson",
  title =        "Defensive climate in the computer science classroom",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "34",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "43--47",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2002",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/563517.563354",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:52 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  note =         "Inroads: paving the way towards excellence in
                 computing education.",
  abstract =     "As part of an NSF-funded IT Workforce grant, the
                 authors conducted ethnographic research to provide deep
                 understanding of the learning environment of computer
                 science classrooms. Categories emerging from data
                 analysis included (1) impersonal environment and
                 guarded behavior; and (2) the creation and maintenance
                 of informal hierarchy resulting in competitive
                 behaviors. These communication patterns lead to a
                 defensive climate, characterized by competitiveness
                 rather cooperation, judgments about others,
                 superiority, and neutrality rather than empathy. The
                 authors identify particular and recognizable types of
                 discourse, which, when prevalent in a classroom, can
                 preclude the development of a collaborative and
                 supportive learning environment.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Reed:2002:IEM,
  author =       "David Reed and Doug Baldwin and Michael Clancy and
                 Allen Downey and Stuart Hansen",
  title =        "Integrating empirical methods into computer science",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "34",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "48--49",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2002",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/563517.563356",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:52 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  note =         "Inroads: paving the way towards excellence in
                 computing education.",
  abstract =     "Empirical skills are playing an increasingly important
                 role in the computing profession and our society. In
                 addition to being problem-solvers and
                 designers/engineers, computer scientists must also be
                 capable experimenters in order to develop, test, and
                 evaluate complex hardware and software systems. The
                 widespread use of computers as tools for
                 interdisciplinary research also demands a strong
                 grounding in the scientific method. This panel is
                 designed to promote discussion about innovative methods
                 for integrating empirical skills within the traditional
                 computer science curriculum. Each panelist will define
                 a set of core empirical concepts and skills that they
                 see as essential to computer scientists, with a brief
                 rationale for each. In conjunction, they will describe
                 classroom practices that serve to demonstrate the key
                 concepts and/or develop skills they have identified.
                 Sufficient time will be allocated for discussion and
                 contributions from the audience.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Hickey:2002:ICC,
  author =       "Timothy Hickey and Amruth Kumar and Linda Wilkens and
                 Andrew Beiderman and Aparna Mahadev and Heidi Ellis",
  title =        "{Internet}-centric computing in the {Computer Science}
                 curriculum",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "34",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "50--51",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2002",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/563517.563358",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:52 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  note =         "Inroads: paving the way towards excellence in
                 computing education.",
  abstract =     "Computer Science as an academic discipline should be
                 guided not only by the ``state of the art'', but also
                 by the ``state of the practice''[1]. Over the last few
                 years, Internet/Web has been undeniably the most ``high
                 profile'' practice of computing. Yet, Computer Science
                 curricula across the country have not kept up with this
                 development --- not many schools are offering courses,
                 concentrations and/or majors that identify the
                 Internet/Web as the central principle, and address its
                 issues and needs. In this panel, the panelists will
                 share their experience designing courses and
                 concentrations to address this need, and present their
                 vision for what an Internet-related Curriculum should
                 include: the courses, the technologies, and the
                 overarching themes. The viewpoints presented here are
                 quite diverse: arguing in favor of Internet-related
                 coursework for majors versus non-majors, as a
                 course/minor/major, as an across-the-curriculum theme,
                 as an interdisciplinary endeavor, as an introductory
                 course versus a capstone course, and from the points of
                 view of a community college, four-year institutions and
                 a graduate institution. We hope that these diverse
                 viewpoints will foster vigorous discussion at the panel
                 about the place of Internet-Computing in the Computer
                 Science curriculum, and its design.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Bernat:2002:TAN,
  author =       "Andrew Bernat and Jane Prey",
  title =        "Taking advantage of {National Science Foundation}
                 funding opportunities",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "34",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "52--52",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2002",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/563517.563360",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:52 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  note =         "Inroads: paving the way towards excellence in
                 computing education.",
  abstract =     "This session will highlight NSF Division of
                 Undergraduate Education programs of interest to college
                 faculty, discussing the requirements and guidelines. It
                 will include a discussion of the characteristics of a
                 competitive proposal and the proposal process.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Dershem:2002:AJL,
  author =       "Herbert L. Dershem and Ryan L. McFall and Ngozi Uti",
  title =        "Animation of {Java} linked lists",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "34",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "53--57",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2002",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/563517.563362",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:52 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  note =         "Inroads: paving the way towards excellence in
                 computing education.",
  abstract =     "Linked lists are an important component of the
                 computer science curriculum. JVALL is a software
                 package that provides an animation of linked list
                 operations that is fully compatible with the Java
                 LinkedList class. The animations are driven by a client
                 program that can be either an applet or standalone
                 application. It provides an effective way for students
                 to learn, experiment with, and debug linked list based
                 classes.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Hamilton-Taylor:2002:SSA,
  author =       "Ashley George Hamilton-Taylor and Eileen Kraemer",
  title =        "{SKA}: supporting algorithm and data structure
                 discussion",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "34",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "58--62",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2002",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/563517.563363",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:52 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  note =         "Inroads: paving the way towards excellence in
                 computing education.",
  abstract =     "Algorithm animation system design has focused
                 primarily on providing advanced graphical capabilities.
                 However, a fundamental mismatch exists between the
                 needs of instructors and the features of existing
                 algorithm animation systems. This mismatch has reduced
                 the rate of adoption of algorithm animation tools. We
                 describe a system, SKA (Support Kit for Animation),
                 whose design is based on an examination of the tasks
                 performed in the process of discussing algorithms and
                 data structures. SKA attempts to support and enhance
                 time-consuming instructional tasks such as tracing and
                 data structure diagram manipulation, while requiring
                 minimal preparation or authoring time.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Grinder:2002:AAC,
  author =       "Michael T. Grinder",
  title =        "Animating automata: a cross-platform program for
                 teaching finite automata",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "34",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "63--67",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2002",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/563517.563364",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:52 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  note =         "Inroads: paving the way towards excellence in
                 computing education.",
  abstract =     "The FSA Simulator is a Java program created to allow
                 computer science students to experiment with finite
                 state automata. The program is able to simulate both
                 deterministic and nondeterministic automata.
                 Pre-defined automata can be loaded from files or
                 students can create their own. Although this project is
                 similar to others, it has its own unique features. The
                 development history, features, and future plans for
                 this program are discussed.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Lee:2002:ICR,
  author =       "J. A. N. Lee",
  title =        "Internationalization of the curriculum report of a
                 project within computer science",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "34",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "68--72",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2002",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/563517.563366",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:52 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  note =         "Inroads: paving the way towards excellence in
                 computing education.",
  abstract =     "In the Fall of 1999 the Center for Excellence in
                 Undergraduate Teaching (CEUT) and the International
                 Office at Virginia Tech provided a small grant to
                 support the incorporation of international aspects into
                 the Computer Science curriculum. The ``Professionalism
                 in Computing'' course was chosen as the vehicle for
                 this activity on the grounds that (a) it is a required
                 course of all majors, and (b) the topics within the
                 course were best amenable to international extensions.
                 Through the efforts of the students in the Spring 2000
                 offering of the course, together with a number of
                 international students, lesson plans for the comparison
                 of non-US aspects of three topics were developed. The
                 topics were Privacy, Freedom of Speech, and Censorship,
                 and the countries covered included Germany, South
                 Korea, China, and Turkey.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Fekete:2002:DMS,
  author =       "Alan Fekete and Bob Kummerfeld",
  title =        "Design of a major in software development",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "34",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "73--77",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2002",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/563517.563367",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:52 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  note =         "Inroads: paving the way towards excellence in
                 computing education.",
  abstract =     "This paper presents a curriculum consisting of a
                 collection of subjects to prepare students for a career
                 in ``software development'' while remaining within the
                 scope normal for a major in a broad liberal arts
                 degree. We describe the principles behind the
                 construction of the curriculum, and contrast it with
                 the more extensive ``Software Engineering Body of
                 Knowledge'' appropriate in a professional Engineering
                 degree.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Doom:2002:PUB,
  author =       "Travis Doom and Michael Raymer and Dan Krane and Oscar
                 Garcia",
  title =        "A proposed undergraduate bioinformatics curriculum for
                 computer scientists",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "34",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "78--81",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2002",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/563517.563368",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:52 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  note =         "Inroads: paving the way towards excellence in
                 computing education.",
  abstract =     "Bioinformatics is a new and rapidly evolving
                 discipline that has emerged from the fields of
                 experimental molecular biology and biochemistry, and
                 from the the artificial intelligence, database, and
                 algorithms disciplines of computer science. Largely
                 because of the inherently interdisciplinary nature of
                 bioinformatics research, academia has been slow to
                 respond to strong industry and government demands for
                 trained scientists to develop and apply novel
                 bioinformatics techniques to the rapidly-growing,
                 freely-available repositories of genetic and proteomic
                 data. While some institutions are responding to this
                 demand by establishing graduate programs in
                 bioinformatics, the entrance barriers for these
                 programs are high, largely due to the significant
                 amount of prerequisite knowledge in the disparate
                 fields of biochemistry and computer science required to
                 author sophisticated new approaches to the analysis of
                 bioinformatics data. We present a proposal for an
                 undergraduate-level bioinformatics curriculum in
                 computer science that lowers these barriers.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Cohoon:2002:WCB,
  author =       "J. McGrath Cohoon",
  title =        "Women in {CS} and biology",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "34",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "82--86",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2002",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/563517.563370",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:52 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  note =         "Inroads: paving the way towards excellence in
                 computing education.",
  abstract =     "Common departmental characteristics and practices in
                 computer science and biology/life science are compared
                 for 46 departments at 23 Virginia colleges and
                 universities. The goal of this preliminary
                 investigation is to provide additional evidence on how
                 departmental factors can affect the retention of female
                 students.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Lopez:2002:AAW,
  author =       "Antonio M. {Lopez, Jr.} and Lisa J. Schulte",
  title =        "{African American} women in the computing sciences: a
                 group to be studied",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "34",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "87--90",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2002",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/563517.563371",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:52 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  note =         "Inroads: paving the way towards excellence in
                 computing education.",
  abstract =     "Most will likely agree that fewer and fewer women are
                 finding their way to completing a bachelor's degree in
                 one of the computing sciences. However, in looking at
                 data collected by the National Science Foundation (NSF)
                 on bachelor's degrees in Computer Science (CS), an
                 interesting anomaly is evident when African American
                 women are viewed as a separate trend. This paper
                 presents some preliminary analysis and suggests that
                 research is needed to better understand this ethnic
                 group that has remained relatively stable in its
                 production of bachelor's degrees in CS.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Francioni:2002:CSA,
  author =       "Joan M. Francioni and Ann C. Smith",
  title =        "Computer science accessibility for students with
                 visual disabilities",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "34",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "91--95",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2002",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/563517.563372",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:52 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  note =         "Inroads: paving the way towards excellence in
                 computing education.",
  abstract =     "Students with visual disabilities face unique
                 challenges in learning to be computer scientists. These
                 challenges can be overcome, however, with the use of
                 specialized software tools and hardware equipment,
                 collectively called assistive technology. In this
                 paper, we discuss the environment we are using for
                 three students with visual disabilities who are
                 starting in our programs this year. This environment
                 includes a collection of commercial assistive
                 technology and a programming tool that we have
                 developed in-house.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Turner:2002:UCS,
  author =       "Peter R. Turner and Angela B. Shiflet and Steve
                 Cunningham and Kris Stewart and Andrew T. Phillips and
                 Ignatios E. Vakalis",
  title =        "Undergraduate computational science and engineering
                 programs and courses",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "34",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "96--97",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2002",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/563517.563374",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:52 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  note =         "Inroads: paving the way towards excellence in
                 computing education.",
  abstract =     "This 90-minute panel session will discuss recent and
                 future developments in incorporating Computational
                 Science and Engineering into the undergraduate
                 curriculum. There is a companion session devoted to
                 tools and techniques and so the focus here is on
                 programs and courses. The panelists will demonstrate a
                 clear uniformity of purpose but a wide variety of
                 approaches to increasing the CSE experience of
                 undergraduates in different types of schools. The
                 schools represented vary from large state universities
                 to small private liberal arts colleges and a
                 medium-sized school with a strong engineering bias. The
                 approaches adopted also differ. There are complete
                 programs built largely from existing courses, specific
                 courses that are added to established programs to allow
                 a student to follow an emphasis in CSE. The
                 introduction of CSE into existing programs through
                 faculty advice and education has also been successful.
                 Yet other approaches represented among the panelists
                 are the introduction of multi-disciplinary team-taught
                 project-based courses as a springboard for growing an
                 undergraduate CSE program including undergraduate
                 research projects. The incremental use of small add-on
                 courses to supplement conventional mathematics
                 offerings with some CSE content has also been used
                 successfully. Another approach represented on the panel
                 is the use of a particular vehicle --- in this case
                 graphics and visualization --- to introduce key ideas
                 of CSE into regular parts of the curriculum. The
                 unifying theme of the panel --- the desire to improve
                 undergraduate CSE education will be evident throughout.
                 By presenting a wide variety of approaches to achieve
                 this end, it is hoped that any audience participants
                 who wish to create a CSE thread in their own programs
                 will find some ideas to help them. Some of the
                 practical and political issues will also be discussed
                 in the various contexts. The program for the panel
                 would allow each panelist a maximum of 10 minutes to
                 outline their programs and approaches. The remaining 30
                 (or more) minutes would then be reserved for general
                 discussion and questions and contributions from the
                 audience.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Elenbogen:2002:MPU,
  author =       "Bruce S. Elenbogen and John Laird and Richard Enbody
                 and Chris McDonald and Peter B. Henderson and Richard
                 Nau and Steve Tanimoto",
  title =        "Mathematics preparation for undergraduate degrees in
                 computer science",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "34",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "98--99",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2002",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/563517.563376",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:52 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  note =         "Inroads: paving the way towards excellence in
                 computing education.",
  abstract =     "Throughout the history of computer science education
                 there has been debate on what should be the appropriate
                 mathematics background for computer science majors. The
                 first computer science instructors were mathematicians
                 and the first curriculums were just modifications of
                 mathematics curriculums. However, as the discipline has
                 grown and matured there has developed several areas of
                 computer science where traditional undergraduate
                 mathematics is not used and traditional mathematics
                 preparation may not be appropriate. Although logic and
                 problem solving skills are valued by the Computer
                 Science community, exactly how many hours of
                 mathematics and what areas of mathematics should be
                 required, needs to be addressed. This panel was
                 convened to discuss this issue from a variety of
                 viewpoints. We hope that discussion will give the
                 listeners new ideas on just what should be the
                 appropriate courses and topics for their institution
                 and program. The panel was chosen to present a wide
                 range of view representing a variety of schools (large
                 and small, public and private, traditional and
                 non-traditional), preparation for the workplace or for
                 disciplines (E-commerce, distributed computing,
                 artificial intelligence, software engineering and
                 graphics) viewpoints (both young and old, industrial
                 and academic).",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Caristi:2002:TEP,
  author =       "James Caristi",
  title =        "Tutorial on extreme programming",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "34",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "100--100",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2002",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/563517.563378",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:52 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  note =         "Inroads: paving the way towards excellence in
                 computing education.",
  abstract =     "The methodology known as Extreme Programming will be
                 presented, beginning with its reason for existence,
                 philosophy, and a detailed exposition of the twelve
                 practices that define it. There will also be a
                 discussion of its strengths and weaknesses as a
                 software design methodology.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Moskal:2002:GEC,
  author =       "Barbara Moskal and Keith Miller and L. A. Smith King",
  title =        "Grading essays in computer ethics: rubrics considered
                 helpful",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "34",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "101--105",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2002",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/563517.563380",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:52 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  note =         "Inroads: paving the way towards excellence in
                 computing education.",
  abstract =     "Computer ethics courses differ from technical courses
                 in the manner in which they are taught and assessed. A
                 common assignment in a computer ethics course is to
                 write an essay that addresses a technical dilemma.
                 Computer science faculty typically do not have training
                 or experience in grading essays. The purpose of this
                 paper is to present a scoring rubric that has been
                 successfully used to grade and track students'
                 knowledge development as they progress through a
                 computer ethics course. Although this paper focuses
                 upon a specific rubric, general principles will be
                 emphasized to show how scoring rubrics can be used
                 across different courses.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Braught:2002:DTS,
  author =       "Grant Braught and David Reed",
  title =        "Disequilibration for teaching the scientific method in
                 computer science",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "34",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "106--110",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2002",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/563517.563381",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:52 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  note =         "Inroads: paving the way towards excellence in
                 computing education.",
  abstract =     "We present several introductory computer science
                 laboratory assignments designed to reinforce the use of
                 the scientific method. These assignments require
                 students to make predictions, write simulations,
                 perform experiments, collect data and analyze the
                 results. The assignments are specifically designed to
                 place student predictions in conflict with the observed
                 results, thus producing a disequilibration. As a
                 result, students are motivated to critically examine
                 their simulations, consider their assumptions, and
                 repeat their experiments. These potential benefits of
                 disequilibration are discussed and additional ways to
                 apply disequilibration in computer science education
                 are suggested.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Holland:2002:NIO,
  author =       "David A. Holland and Ada T. Lim and Margo I. Seltzer",
  title =        "A new instructional operating system",
  journal =      j-SIGCSE,
  volume =       "34",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "111--115",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2002",
  CODEN =        "SIGSD3",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/563517.563383",
  ISSN =         "0097-8418",
  ISSN-L =       "0097-8418",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 17 16:56:52 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://portal.acm.org/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigcse2000.bib",
  note =         "Inroads: paving the way towards excellence in
                 computing education.",
  abstract =     "This paper presents a new instructional operating
                 system, OS/161, and simulated execution environment,
                 System/161, for use in teaching an introductory
                 undergraduate operating systems course. We describe the
                 new system, the assignments used in our course, and our
                 experience teaching using the new system.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "SIGCSE Bulletin (ACM Special Interest Group on
                 Computer Science Education)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J688",
}

@Article{Atkin:2002:PEO,
  author =       "Benjamin Atkin and Emin G{\"u}n Sirer",
  title =        "{PortOS}: an educational operating sy