%%% -*-BibTeX-*-
%%% ====================================================================
%%%  BibTeX-file{
%%%     author          = "Nelson H. F. Beebe",
%%%     version         = "1.13",
%%%     date            = "05 March 2015",
%%%     time            = "16:27:37 MST",
%%%     filename        = "jocch.bib",
%%%     address         = "University of Utah
%%%                        Department of Mathematics, 110 LCB
%%%                        155 S 1400 E RM 233
%%%                        Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0090
%%%                        USA",
%%%     telephone       = "+1 801 581 5254",
%%%     FAX             = "+1 801 581 4148",
%%%     URL             = "http://www.math.utah.edu/~beebe",
%%%     checksum        = "28247 4752 25223 241696",
%%%     email           = "beebe at math.utah.edu, beebe at acm.org,
%%%                        beebe at computer.org (Internet)",
%%%     codetable       = "ISO/ASCII",
%%%     keywords        = "bibliography; BibTeX; Journal on Computing
%%%                        and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
%%%     license         = "public domain",
%%%     supported       = "no",
%%%     docstring       = "This is a COMPLETE BibTeX bibliography for
%%%                        the Journal on Computing and Cultural
%%%                        Heritage (JOCCH) (CODEN unknown, ISSN
%%%                        1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)),
%%%                        for 2008--date.
%%%
%%%                        Publication began with volume 1, number 1,
%%%                        in June 2008.  The journal had only two
%%%                        issues in volume 1, and appears quarterly
%%%                        since then.
%%%
%%%                        The journal has a World-Wide Web site at:
%%%
%%%                            http://www.acm.org/pubs/jocch
%%%                            http://jocch.acm.org/
%%%                            http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157
%%%
%%%                        Qualified subscribers can retrieve the full
%%%                        text of recent articles in PDF form.
%%%
%%%                        At version 1.13, the COMPLETE journal
%%%                        coverage looked like this:
%%%
%%%                             2008 (  12)    2011 (  16)    2014 (  19)
%%%                             2009 (   8)    2012 (  17)    2015 (  19)
%%%                             2010 (   8)    2013 (  19)
%%%
%%%                             Article:        118
%%%
%%%                             Total entries:  118
%%%
%%%                        Data for this bibliography was derived from
%%%                        data at the ACM Web site.
%%%
%%%                        ACM copyrights explicitly permit abstracting
%%%                        with credit, so article abstracts, keywords,
%%%                        and subject classifications have been
%%%                        included in this bibliography wherever
%%%                        available.
%%%
%%%                        The bibsource keys in the bibliography
%%%                        entries below indicate the data sources.
%%%
%%%                        URL keys in the bibliography point to
%%%                        World Wide Web locations of additional
%%%                        information about the entry.
%%%
%%%                        Spelling has been verified with the UNIX
%%%                        spell and GNU ispell programs using the
%%%                        exception dictionary stored in the
%%%                        companion file with extension .sok.
%%%
%%%                        BibTeX citation tags are uniformly chosen
%%%                        as name:year:abbrev, where name is the
%%%                        family name of the first author or editor,
%%%                        year is a 4-digit number, and abbrev is a
%%%                        3-letter condensation of important title
%%%                        words. Citation tags were automatically
%%%                        generated by software developed for the
%%%                        BibNet Project.
%%%
%%%                        In this bibliography, entries are sorted in
%%%                        publication order, using ``bibsort -byvolume.''
%%%
%%%                        The checksum field above contains a CRC-16
%%%                        checksum as the first value, followed by the
%%%                        equivalent of the standard UNIX wc (word
%%%                        count) utility output of lines, words, and
%%%                        characters.  This is produced by Robert
%%%                        Solovay's checksum utility.",
%%%  }
%%% ====================================================================

@Preamble{"\input bibnames.sty"
    # "\ifx \undefined \circled \def \circled #1{(#1)}\fi"
    # "\ifx \undefined \reg \def \reg {\circled{R}}\fi"
}

%%% ====================================================================
%%% Acknowledgement abbreviations:

@String{ack-nhfb = "Nelson H. F. Beebe,
                    University of Utah,
                    Department of Mathematics, 110 LCB,
                    155 S 1400 E RM 233,
                    Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0090, USA,
                    Tel: +1 801 581 5254,
                    FAX: +1 801 581 4148,
                    e-mail: \path|beebe@math.utah.edu|,
                            \path|beebe@acm.org|,
                            \path|beebe@computer.org| (Internet),
                    URL: \path|http://www.math.utah.edu/~beebe/|"}

%%% ====================================================================
%%% Journal abbreviations:

@String{j-JOCCH         = "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)"}

%%% ====================================================================
%%% Bibliography entries:

@Article{Arnold:2008:EII,
  author =       "David Arnold",
  title =        "Editorial for inaugural issue of {JOCCH}: {Pasteur's
                 Quadrant}: {Cultural} heritage as inspiration for basic
                 research in computer science",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "1:1--1:??",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2008",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/1367080.1367081",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4711",
  bibdate =      "Sat Jan 15 17:48:24 MST 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "1",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Cignoni:2008:SMC,
  author =       "Paolo Cignoni and Roberto Scopigno",
  title =        "Sampled {$3$D} models for {CH} applications: {A}
                 viable and enabling new medium or just a technological
                 exercise?",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "2:1--2:??",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2008",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/1367080.1367082",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4711",
  bibdate =      "Sat Jan 15 17:48:24 MST 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "2",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{DeJong:2008:ARI,
  author =       "Franciska {De Jong} and Douglas W. Oard and Willemijn
                 Heeren and Roeland Ordelman",
  title =        "Access to recorded interviews: {A} research agenda",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "3:1--3:??",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2008",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/1367080.1367083",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4711",
  bibdate =      "Sat Jan 15 17:48:24 MST 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "3",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Lampe:2008:RBN,
  author =       "Karl-Heinz Lampe and Klaus Riede and Martin Doerr",
  title =        "Research between natural and cultural history
                 information: {Benefits} and {IT}-requirements for
                 transdisciplinarity",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "4:1--4:??",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2008",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/1367080.1367084",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4711",
  bibdate =      "Sat Jan 15 17:48:24 MST 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "4",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Doerr:2008:DGK,
  author =       "Martin Doerr and Dolores Iorizzo",
  title =        "The dream of a global knowledge network --- {A} new
                 approach",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "5:1--5:??",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2008",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/1367080.1367085",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4711",
  bibdate =      "Sat Jan 15 17:48:24 MST 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "5",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Bonardi:2008:PEM,
  author =       "Alain Bonardi and J{\'e}rome Barth{\'e}lemy",
  title =        "The preservation, emulation, migration, and
                 virtualization of live electronics for performing arts:
                 {An} overview of musical and technical issues",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "6:1--6:??",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2008",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/1367080.1367086",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4711",
  bibdate =      "Sat Jan 15 17:48:24 MST 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "6",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Arnold:2008:E,
  author =       "David Arnold",
  title =        "Editorial",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "7:1--7:??",
  month =        oct,
  year =         "2008",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/1434763.1434764",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4711",
  bibdate =      "Sat Jan 15 17:48:25 MST 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "7",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Gutierrez:2008:MLS,
  author =       "Diego Gutierrez and Veronica Sundstedt and Fermin
                 Gomez and Alan Chalmers",
  title =        "Modeling light scattering for virtual heritage",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "8:1--8:??",
  month =        oct,
  year =         "2008",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/1434763.1434765",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4711",
  bibdate =      "Sat Jan 15 17:48:25 MST 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "8",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Hutchings:2008:USA,
  author =       "Jeremy Hutchings and Jonathan Ashley Smith",
  title =        "Using survival analysis on conservation metadata to
                 benchmark treatment frequency",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "9:1--9:??",
  month =        oct,
  year =         "2008",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/1434763.1434766",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4711",
  bibdate =      "Sat Jan 15 17:48:25 MST 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "9",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Djibril:2008:IGP,
  author =       "Mohamed Ould Djibril and Rachid Oulad Haj Thami",
  title =        "{Islamic} geometrical patterns indexing and
                 classification using discrete symmetry groups",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "10:1--10:??",
  month =        oct,
  year =         "2008",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/1434763.1434767",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4711",
  bibdate =      "Sat Jan 15 17:48:25 MST 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "10",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Laycock:2008:ECH,
  author =       "R. G. Laycock and D. Drinkwater and A. M. Day",
  title =        "Exploring cultural heritage sites through space and
                 time",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "11:1--11:??",
  month =        oct,
  year =         "2008",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/1434763.1434768",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4711",
  bibdate =      "Sat Jan 15 17:48:25 MST 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "11",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Ullrich:2008:SFR,
  author =       "Torsten Ullrich and Volker Settgast and Dieter W.
                 Fellner",
  title =        "Semantic fitting and reconstruction",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "12:1--12:??",
  month =        oct,
  year =         "2008",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/1434763.1434769",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4711",
  bibdate =      "Sat Jan 15 17:48:25 MST 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "12",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Thuswaldner:2009:DAO,
  author =       "Barbara Thuswaldner and Simon Fl{\"o}ry and Robert
                 Kalasek and Michael Hofer and Qi-Xing Huang and Hilke
                 Th{\"u}r",
  title =        "Digital anastylosis of the {Octagon} in {Ephesos}",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "2",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "1:1--1:??",
  month =        jul,
  year =         "2009",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/1551676.1551677",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4711",
  bibdate =      "Sat Jan 15 17:48:26 MST 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "1",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Remondino:2009:MCD,
  author =       "Fabio Remondino and Stefano Girardi and Alessandro
                 Rizzi and Lorenzo Gonzo",
  title =        "{$3$D} modeling of complex and detailed cultural
                 heritage using multi-resolution data",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "2",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "2:1--2:??",
  month =        jul,
  year =         "2009",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/1551676.1551678",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4711",
  bibdate =      "Sat Jan 15 17:48:26 MST 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "2",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Goncalves:2009:HDR,
  author =       "Alexandrino Gon{\c{c}}alves and Lu{\'\i}s
                 Magalh{\~a}es and Jo{\~a}o Moura and Alan Chalmers",
  title =        "High dynamic range-a gateway for predictive ancient
                 lighting",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "2",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "3:1--3:??",
  month =        jul,
  year =         "2009",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/1551676.1551679",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4711",
  bibdate =      "Sat Jan 15 17:48:26 MST 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "3",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Havemann:2009:ASR,
  author =       "Sven Havemann and Volker Settgast and Ren{\'e} Berndt
                 and {\O}yvind Eide and Dieter W. Fellner",
  title =        "The {Arrigo Showcase} reloaded --- towards a
                 sustainable link between {$3$D} and semantics",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "2",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "4:1--4:??",
  month =        jul,
  year =         "2009",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/1551676.1551680",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4711",
  bibdate =      "Sat Jan 15 17:48:26 MST 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "4",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{DeGotzen:2009:MHF,
  author =       "Amalia {De G{\"o}tzen} and Stefania Serafin",
  title =        "The musical heritage of futurism: {A} digital
                 reconstruction of the intonarumori family",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "2",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "5:1--5:??",
  month =        nov,
  year =         "2009",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/1613672.1613673",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4711",
  bibdate =      "Sat Jan 15 17:48:26 MST 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "5",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Hussein:2009:WFM,
  author =       "Ashraf S. Hussein and Hisham El-Shishiny",
  title =        "Wind flow modeling and simulation over the {Giza
                 Plateau} cultural heritage site in {Egypt}",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "2",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "6:1--6:??",
  month =        nov,
  year =         "2009",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/1613672.1613674",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4711",
  bibdate =      "Sat Jan 15 17:48:26 MST 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "6",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Koller:2009:RCD,
  author =       "David Koller and Bernard Frischer and Greg Humphreys",
  title =        "Research challenges for digital archives of {$3$D}
                 cultural heritage models",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "2",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "7:1--7:??",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2009",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/1658346.1658347",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4711",
  bibdate =      "Sat Jan 15 17:48:27 MST 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "7",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Yalniz:2009:OAE,
  author =       "Ismet Zeki Yalniz and Ismail Sengor Altingovde and
                 Ugur G{\"u}d{\"u}kbay and {\"O}zg{\"u}r Ulusoy",
  title =        "{Ottoman Archives Explorer}: {A} retrieval system for
                 digital {Ottoman} archives",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "2",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "8:1--8:??",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2009",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/1658346.1658348",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4711",
  bibdate =      "Sat Jan 15 17:48:27 MST 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "8",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Dellepiane:2010:ICA,
  author =       "M. Dellepiane and M. Callieri and M. Corsini and P.
                 Cignoni and R. Scopigno",
  title =        "Improved color acquisition and mapping on {$3$D}
                 models via flash-based photography",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "2",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "9:1--9:??",
  month =        feb,
  year =         "2010",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/1709091.1709092",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4711",
  bibdate =      "Sat Jan 15 17:48:27 MST 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "9",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Foni:2010:TVS,
  author =       "Alessandro E. Foni and George Papagiannakis and Nadia
                 Magnenat-Thalmann",
  title =        "A taxonomy of visualization strategies for cultural
                 heritage applications",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "3",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "1:1--1:??",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2010",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/1805961.1805962",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4711",
  bibdate =      "Sat Jan 15 17:48:28 MST 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "1",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Muller:2010:PDO,
  author =       "Florian M{\"u}ller and Peter Fornaro and Lukas
                 Rosenthaler and Rudolf Gschwind",
  title =        "{PEVIAR}: {Digital} originals",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "3",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "2:1--2:??",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2010",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/1805961.1805963",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4711",
  bibdate =      "Sat Jan 15 17:48:28 MST 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "2",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Roussopoulos:2010:IPA,
  author =       "Panayiotis Roussopoulos and Constantin Papaodysseus
                 and Dimitris Arabadjis and Mihalis Exarhos and Michail
                 Panagopoulos",
  title =        "Image and pattern analysis for the determination of
                 the method of drawing celebrated {Thera} wall-paintings
                 circa {1650 B.C.}",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "3",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "3:1--3:??",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2010",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/1841317.1841318",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4711",
  bibdate =      "Thu Apr 21 09:32:25 MDT 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  abstract =     "In this article, an integrated conjecture about the
                 method of drawing of monumental prehistoric
                 wall-paintings is presented and supported.
                 Specifically, the article deals with paintings that
                 initially decorated the internal walls of the highest
                 floor of a building, called Xeste 3, at Akrotiri of
                 the Greek island of Thera circa. 1650 B.C. It is argued
                 that these wall-paintings could had been drawn while
                 the brush was guided by an apparatus, which corresponds
                 to advanced for the era of geometric prototypes with
                 impressive precision. A set of assumptions concerning
                 the actions the artists might have taken in order to
                 create the spiral themes is stated and supported. These
                 assumptions refer to the existence of a draft plan, the
                 sequence of brush strokes, the placement of the brush
                 on the wall, as well as the possible form of the
                 apparatus. These conjectures are evaluated and tested
                 by means of curve fitting and image analysis methods
                 developed by the authors. The results indicate that all
                 drawn contour parts optimally fit along a single
                 prototype linear spiral with fitting error of less than
                 0.4mm, supporting existence of a very advanced culture
                 for the era of geometric guide. It is statistically
                 rejected that this guide could have the form of a
                 stamp. Moreover, there is strong evidence that the
                 painter might have used a draft plan of the spiral
                 themes to prepare the final drawing and that the linear
                 spiral guide has been used by alternating its
                 placements in order to form the internal and external
                 spiral contour.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "3",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Reuter:2010:ADV,
  author =       "Patrick Reuter and Guillaume Riviere and Nadine
                 Couture and Stephanie Mahut and Loic Espinasse",
  title =        "{ArcheoTUI} --- Driving virtual reassemblies with
                 tangible {$3$D} interaction",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "3",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "4:1--4:??",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2010",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/1841317.1841319",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4711",
  bibdate =      "Thu Apr 21 09:32:25 MDT 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "4",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Sun:2010:ACZ,
  author =       "Qing Sun and Deyun Zhang and Yifeng Fan and Kaizhong
                 Zhang and Bin Ma",
  title =        "Ancient {Chinese} zither (guqin) music recovery with
                 support vector machine",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "3",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "5:1--5:??",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2010",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/1841317.1841320",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4711",
  bibdate =      "Thu Apr 21 09:32:25 MDT 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  abstract =     "The Chinese zither, called guqin, has existed for over
                 3,000 years and always played an important role in
                 Chinese social history. An interesting but unfortunate
                 fact is that the traditional notation of guqin music
                 does not provide the duration information for each
                 music note which requires the player to learn from his
                 teacher and memorize. As a result, among several
                 thousands of compositions that have been created and
                 recorded with guqin music notation, only around 100 of
                 them are still being played today. In this article we
                 use a machine learning method to study the guqin music
                 recovery problem which tries to use the guqin music
                 notation to recover the duration of each music note.
                 Information provided by the music note is used as
                 features to predict the duration information with a
                 support vector machine. The experimental result shows
                 that our system can predict with fair accuracy, and can
                 be used as a valuable reference for human guqin masters
                 to recover guqin music.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "5",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Palma:2010:DSE,
  author =       "Gianpaolo Palma and Massimiliano Corsini and Paolo
                 Cignoni and Roberto Scopigno and Mark Mudge",
  title =        "Dynamic shading enhancement for reflectance
                 transformation imaging",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "3",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "6:1--6:??",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2010",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/1841317.1841321",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4711",
  bibdate =      "Thu Apr 21 09:32:25 MDT 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "6",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Antoniou:2010:MVP,
  author =       "Angeliki Antoniou and George Lepouras",
  title =        "Modeling visitors' profiles: {A} study to investigate
                 adaptation aspects for museum learning technologies",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "3",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "7:1--7:??",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2010",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/1841317.1841322",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4711",
  bibdate =      "Thu Apr 21 09:32:25 MDT 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "7",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Doerr:2011:FAC,
  author =       "Martin Doerr and Athina Kritsotaki and Katerina
                 Boutsika",
  title =        "Factual argumentation --- a core model for assertions
                 making",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "3",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "8:1--8:??",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2011",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/1921614.1921615",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4711",
  bibdate =      "Thu Apr 21 09:32:26 MDT 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "8",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Ni:2011:HIS,
  author =       "Enzhi Ni and Minjun Jiang and Xiaojun Ding and Changle
                 Zhou",
  title =        "Handwriting input system of {Chinese} guqin notation",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "3",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "9:1--9:??",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2011",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/1921614.1921616",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4711",
  bibdate =      "Thu Apr 21 09:32:26 MDT 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  abstract =     "The guqin is an ancient Chinese musical instrument
                 that has secured a key position in Chinese elite
                 culture. The guqin has its own special notation
                 composed of reduced characters. The input system of the
                 guqin notation is necessary for digital storage and
                 analysis of guqin notation. This article presents the
                 first handwriting input system of guqin notation. This
                 system adopts a radical-based approach. In this
                 approach, the radicals of the input reduced character
                 are extracted first. Next the layout template that best
                 matches the character is found. The name of the
                 character can then be interpreted according to the
                 radicals and the matching layout template. Radical
                 extraction is the key step of any radical-based
                 approach. In this article a method of radical
                 extraction for online cursive characters is proposed.
                 Experimental results show that the approach is
                 efficient and that the input system performs well.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "9",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Grieser:2011:UOD,
  author =       "Karl Grieser and Timothy Baldwin and Fabian Bohnert
                 and Liz Sonenberg",
  title =        "Using ontological and document similarity to estimate
                 museum exhibit relatedness",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "3",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "10:1--10:??",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2011",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/1921614.1921617",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4711",
  bibdate =      "Thu Apr 21 09:32:26 MDT 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "10",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Kuflik:2011:VGA,
  author =       "Tsvi Kuflik and Oliviero Stock and Massimo Zancanaro
                 and Ariel Gorfinkel and Sadek Jbara and Shahar Kats and
                 Julia Sheidin and Nadav Kashtan",
  title =        "A visitor's guide in an active museum:
                 {Presentations}, communications, and reflection",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "3",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "11:1--11:??",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2011",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/1921614.1921618",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4711",
  bibdate =      "Thu Apr 21 09:32:26 MDT 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "11",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Aliaga:2011:DFD,
  author =       "Daniel G. Aliaga and Elisa Bertino and Stefano
                 Valtolina",
  title =        "{DECHO} --- a framework for the digital exploration of
                 cultural heritage objects",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "3",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "12:1--12:??",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2011",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/1921614.1921619",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4711",
  bibdate =      "Thu Apr 21 09:32:26 MDT 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "12",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Diaz:2011:IWB,
  author =       "Lily D{\'\i}az and Markku Reunanen and Blanca
                 Acu{\~n}a and Atte Timonen",
  title =        "{ImaNote}: {A} {Web}-based multi-user image map
                 viewing and annotation tool",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "3",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "13:1--13:??",
  month =        apr,
  year =         "2011",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/1957825.1957826",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4711",
  bibdate =      "Thu Apr 21 09:32:27 MDT 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "13",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Callieri:2011:MAP,
  author =       "Marco Callieri and Antoni Chica and Matteo Dellepiane
                 and Isaac Besora and Massimiliano Corsini and Jordi
                 Moy{\'e}s and Guido Ranzuglia and Roberto Scopigno and
                 Pere Brunet",
  title =        "Multiscale acquisition and presentation of very large
                 artifacts: {The} case of portalada",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "3",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "14:1--14:??",
  month =        apr,
  year =         "2011",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/1957825.1957827",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4711",
  bibdate =      "Thu Apr 21 09:32:27 MDT 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  abstract =     "The dichotomy between full detail representation and
                 the efficient management of data digitization is still
                 a big issue in the context of the acquisition and
                 visualization of 3D objects, especially in the field of
                 the cultural heritage. Modern scanning devices enable
                 very detailed geometry to be acquired, but it is
                 usually quite hard to apply these technologies to large
                 artifacts. In this article we present a project aimed
                 at virtually reconstructing the impressive ($7 \times
                 11$ m.) portal of the Ripoll Monastery, Spain. The
                 monument was acquired using triangulation laser
                 scanning technology, producing a dataset of 2212 range
                 maps for a total of more than 1 billion triangles. All
                 the steps of the entire project are described, from the
                 acquisition planning to the final setup for
                 dissemination to the public. We show how time-of-flight
                 laser scanning data can be used to speed-up the
                 alignment process. In addition we show how, after
                 creating a model and repairing imperfections, an
                 interactive and immersive setup enables the public to
                 navigate and display a fully detailed representation of
                 the portal. This article shows that, after careful
                 planning and with the aid of state-of-the-art
                 algorithms, it is now possible to preserve and
                 visualize highly detailed information, even for very
                 large surfaces.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "14",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Das:2011:DRP,
  author =       "Vinay Mohan Das and Yogesh K. Garg",
  title =        "Digital reconstruction of pavilions described in an
                 ancient {Indian} architectural treatise",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "4",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "1:1--1:??",
  month =        aug,
  year =         "2011",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2001416.2001417",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4711",
  bibdate =      "Tue Aug 30 08:26:41 MDT 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "1",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Volpe:2011:SES,
  author =       "Gualtiero Volpe and Antonio Camurri",
  title =        "A system for embodied social active listening to sound
                 and music content",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "4",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "2:1--2:??",
  month =        aug,
  year =         "2011",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2001416.2001418",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4711",
  bibdate =      "Tue Aug 30 08:26:41 MDT 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "2",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Hurtut:2011:ALD,
  author =       "Thomas Hurtut and Yann Gousseau and Farida Cheriet and
                 Francis Schmitt",
  title =        "Artistic line-drawings retrieval based on the
                 pictorial content",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "4",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "3:1--3:??",
  month =        aug,
  year =         "2011",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2001416.2001419",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4711",
  bibdate =      "Tue Aug 30 08:26:41 MDT 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "3",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Friedlander:2011:ISI,
  author =       "A. Friedlander",
  title =        "Introduction to the special issue on {eHeritage}",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "4",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "8:1--8:??",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2011",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2069276.2069277",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Sat Feb 25 18:18:38 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "8",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Pisa:2011:SPC,
  author =       "Cecilia Pisa and Fabiana Zeppa and Gabriele Fangi",
  title =        "Spherical photogrammetry for cultural heritage ---
                 {San Galgano Abbey} and the {Roman Theater},
                 {Sabratha}",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "4",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "9:1--9:??",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2011",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2069276.2069278",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Sat Feb 25 18:18:38 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "9",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Seidl:2011:GTD,
  author =       "Markus Seidl and Matthias Zeppelzauer and Dalibor
                 Mitrovi{\'c} and Christian Breiteneder",
  title =        "Gradual transition detection in historic film material
                 --- a systematic study",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "4",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "10:1--10:??",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2011",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2069276.2069279",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Sat Feb 25 18:18:38 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "10",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Mallik:2011:NPI,
  author =       "Anupama Mallik and Santanu Chaudhury and Hiranmay
                 Ghosh",
  title =        "{Nrityakosha}: {Preserving} the intangible heritage of
                 {Indian} classical dance",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "4",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "11:1--11:??",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2011",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2069276.2069280",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Sat Feb 25 18:18:38 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "11",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Obonyo:2011:DST,
  author =       "Victor Obonyo and Douglas Troy and Daryl Baldwin and
                 James Clarke",
  title =        "Digital smartpen technology and revitalization of the
                 {Myaamia} language",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "4",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "12:1--12:??",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2011",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2050096.2050097",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Sat Feb 25 18:18:38 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "12",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Ashley:2011:LHH,
  author =       "Michael Ashley and Ruth Tringham and Cinzia
                 Perlingieri",
  title =        "{Last House on the Hill}: Digitally remediating data
                 and media for preservation and access",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "4",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "13:1--13:??",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2011",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2050096.2050098",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Sat Feb 25 18:18:38 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "13",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Crane:2012:ISI,
  author =       "Gregory Crane and Anke L{\"u}deling",
  title =        "Introduction to the special issue on corpus and
                 computational linguistics, philology, and the
                 linguistic heritage of humanity",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "5",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "1:1--1:??",
  month =        apr,
  year =         "2012",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2160165.2160166",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Thu Nov 8 18:41:57 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  abstract =     "The articles in this issue make two complementary
                 assertions: first, language and linguistic sources are
                 a key element of human cultural heritage and, second,
                 we need to integrate the ancient goals of philology
                 with rapidly emerging methods from fields such as
                 Corpus and Computational Linguistics. The first
                 15,000,000 volumes digitized by Google contained data
                 from more than 400 languages covering more than four
                 thousand years of the human record. We need to develop
                 methods to explore linguistic changes and the ideas
                 that languages encode as these evolve and circulate
                 over millennia and on a global scale.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "1",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Bamman:2012:ETT,
  author =       "David Bamman and David Smith",
  title =        "Extracting two thousand years of {Latin} from a
                 million book library",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "5",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "2:1--2:??",
  month =        apr,
  year =         "2012",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2160165.2160167",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Thu Nov 8 18:41:57 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  abstract =     "With the rise of large open digitization projects such
                 as the Internet Archive and Google Books, we are
                 witnessing an explosive growth in the number of source
                 texts becoming available to researchers in historical
                 languages. The Internet Archive alone contains over
                 27,014 texts catalogued as Latin, including classical
                 prose and poetry written under the Roman Empire,
                 ecclesiastical treatises from the Middle Ages, and
                 dissertations from 19th-century Germany written-in
                 Latin-on the philosophy of Hegel. At one billion words,
                 this collection eclipses the extant corpus of Classical
                 Latin by several orders of magnitude. In addition, the
                 much larger collection of books in English, German,
                 French, and other languages already scanned contains
                 unknown numbers of translations for many Latin books,
                 or parts of books. The sheer scale of this collection
                 offers a broad vista of new research questions, and we
                 focus here on both the opportunities and challenges of
                 computing over such a large space of heterogeneous
                 texts. The works in this massive collection do not
                 constitute a finely curated (or much less balanced)
                 corpus of Latin; it is, instead, simply all the Latin
                 that can be extracted, and in its reach of twenty-one
                 centuries (from approximately 200 BCE to 1922 CE)
                 arguably spans the greatest historical distance of any
                 major textual collection today. While we might hope
                 that the size and historical reach of this collection
                 can eventually offer insight into grand questions such
                 as the evolution of a language over both time and
                 space, we must contend as well with the noise inherent
                 in a corpus that has been assembled with minimal human
                 intervention.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "2",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Mimno:2012:CHD,
  author =       "David Mimno",
  title =        "Computational historiography: Data mining in a century
                 of classics journals",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "5",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "3:1--3:??",
  month =        apr,
  year =         "2012",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2160165.2160168",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Thu Nov 8 18:41:57 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  abstract =     "More than a century of modern Classical scholarship
                 has created a vast archive of journal publications that
                 is now becoming available online. Most of this work
                 currently receives little, if any, attention. The
                 collection is too large to be read by any single person
                 and mostly not of sufficient interest to warrant
                 traditional close reading. This article presents
                 computational methods for identifying patterns and
                 testing hypotheses about Classics as a field. Such
                 tools can help organize large collections, introduce
                 younger scholars to the history of the field, and act
                 as a ``survey,'' identifying anomalies that can be
                 explored using more traditional methods.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "3",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Hirschmann:2012:MCL,
  author =       "Hagen Hirschmann and Anke L{\"u}deling and Amir
                 Zeldes",
  title =        "Measuring and coding language change: an evolving
                 study in a multilayer corpus architecture",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "5",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "4:1--4:??",
  month =        apr,
  year =         "2012",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2160165.2160169",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Thu Nov 8 18:41:57 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  abstract =     "Our article explores the possibilities of using deeply
                 annotated, incrementally evolving comparable corpora
                 for the study of language change, in this case for
                 different stages from Old High German to New High
                 German. Using the example of the evolution of German
                 past tenses, we show how a variety of categories
                 ranging from low to high complexity interact with the
                 choice between competing linguistic variants. To
                 adequately explore the influence of these categories,
                 we use a multilayer corpus architecture that develops
                 together with our study. We show that a combination of
                 quantitative and qualitative analyses can recognize
                 relevant contextual factors, which feed into the
                 addition of new annotation layers applying to the same
                 data. By making our categorizations explicit as corpus
                 annotations and our data available to other
                 researchers, we promote an open, extensible, and
                 transparent mode of research, where both raw data and
                 the inferential process are exposed to other
                 researchers.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "4",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Scopigno:2012:E,
  author =       "Roberto Scopigno",
  title =        "Editorial",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "5",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "5:1--5:??",
  month =        jul,
  year =         "2012",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2307723.2307724",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Thu Nov 8 18:41:58 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "5",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Ma:2012:ATC,
  author =       "Wei Ma and Yizhou Wang and Ying-Qing Xu and Qiong Li
                 and Xin Ma and Wen Gao",
  title =        "Annotating traditional {Chinese} paintings for
                 immersive virtual exhibition",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "5",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "6:1--6:??",
  month =        jul,
  year =         "2012",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2307723.2307725",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Thu Nov 8 18:41:58 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  abstract =     "We propose a new method of annotating a masterpiece of
                 traditional Chinese painting with voice dubbings and
                 environmental sounds. The painting was created with
                 moving focus drawing technique without rigorous
                 perspective. A novel algorithm is proposed to infer the
                 3D space of the painting according to its layout and
                 embed the audio annotations. For exhibition, the
                 masterpiece is scanned into a high-resolution gigapixel
                 image for presenting the drawing details, and we
                 develop an interactive multimedia system with a panning
                 and zooming interface to enable smooth navigation on
                 the giant painting and exploring the historical
                 culture. During the navigation, the system estimates
                 the 3D position of the user's viewpoint from his/her
                 actions, and subsequently synthesizes a realistic
                 stereo audio field according to the viewer's
                 orientation and distance from the annotations in the 3D
                 space. The proposed system provides an immersive user
                 experience by rendering a visual-audio consistent
                 perception.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "6",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Shamir:2012:CAA,
  author =       "Lior Shamir and Jane A. Tarakhovsky",
  title =        "Computer analysis of art",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "5",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "7:1--7:??",
  month =        jul,
  year =         "2012",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2307723.2307726",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Thu Nov 8 18:41:58 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  abstract =     "Analysis of visual art is a highly complex cognitive
                 task that depends on the very many aspects of the art
                 as well as complex brain connectivity, and the
                 examination of visual art and the analysis of
                 influential links between artists and artistic
                 movements require the trained eye of knowledgeable art
                 historians. However, while the human eye and brain can
                 perceive visual art and notice the differences,
                 similarities, and influential links between painters,
                 computers employing artificial intelligence find this
                 task far more challenging. In this article we show that
                 computers can automatically analyze paintings of
                 different artists and different schools of art in an
                 unsupervised fashion. Experimental results show that
                 the automatic computer analysis can group artists by
                 their artistic movements, and provide a map of
                 similarities and influential links that is largely in
                 agreement with the analysis of art historians. These
                 results demonstrate that machine vision and pattern
                 recognition algorithms are able to mimic the complex
                 cognitive task of the human perception of visual art,
                 and can be used to measure and quantify visual
                 similarities between paintings, painters, and schools
                 of art.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "7",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Hug:2012:QEC,
  author =       "Charlotte Hug and Cesar Gonzalez-Perez",
  title =        "Qualitative evaluation of cultural heritage
                 information modeling techniques",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "5",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "8:1--8:??",
  month =        jul,
  year =         "2012",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2307723.2307727",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Thu Nov 8 18:41:58 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  abstract =     "In this article we evaluate three modeling techniques
                 coming from information system engineering to represent
                 cultural heritage domain concepts. Evaluations of the
                 modeling techniques were performed by carrying out
                 experiments with cultural heritage specialists. The
                 first experiment consisted in evaluating UML class
                 diagrams and a conceptual graph. The second experiment
                 evaluated a value cluster modeling approach. These
                 qualitative evaluations were conducted using focus
                 groups composed of cultural heritage specialists. We
                 evaluated the perceived ease of use, the perceived
                 usefulness, and the intention to use of the three
                 techniques (UML class diagrams, conceptual graphs, and
                 the value cluster approach). Thanks to these
                 evaluations, we will be able to propose a combined
                 approach using value cluster modeling and UML class
                 diagraming techniques to describe cultural heritage
                 information.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "8",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Lu:2012:IBA,
  author =       "Zheng Lu and Wei Luo and Zhijun Sun and Moshe Ben-Ezra
                 and Michael S. Brown",
  title =        "Imaging {Buddhist} art with a digital large-format
                 camera: a field study report from the {Dunhuang
                 Caves}",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "5",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "9:1--9:??",
  month =        oct,
  year =         "2012",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2362402.2362403",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Thu Nov 8 18:41:59 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  abstract =     "This article describes recent field work undertaken by
                 Microsoft Research Asia and the Dunhuang Academy to
                 capture high-resolution images of Buddhist art at the
                 UNESCO world heritage site, the Mogao Caves. This
                 project is intended as a feasibility study examining
                 the use of a digital large-format gigapixel camera to
                 capture high-resolution images in a cultural heritage
                 setting. In particular, we report on the current
                 challenges faced by the Dunhuang Academy in their
                 imaging efforts and how the use of a digital
                 large-format camera can improve the quality of the
                 imaging process while reducing time and effort. We also
                 describe lessons learned from this field study as well
                 as remaining challenges inherent to such projects.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "9",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Shin:2012:ASF,
  author =       "Hijung Shin and Christos Doumas and Thomas Funkhouser
                 and Szymon Rusinkiewicz and Kenneth Steiglitz and
                 Andreas Vlachopoulos and Tim Weyrich",
  title =        "Analyzing and simulating fracture patterns of {Theran}
                 wall paintings",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "5",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "10:1--10:??",
  month =        oct,
  year =         "2012",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2362402.2362404",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Thu Nov 8 18:41:59 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  abstract =     "In this article, we analyze the fracture patterns
                 observed in wall paintings excavated at Akrotiri, a
                 Bronze Age Aegean settlement destroyed by a volcano on
                 the Greek island of Thera around 1630 BC. We use
                 interactive programs to trace detailed fragment
                 boundaries in images of manually reconstructed wall
                 paintings. Then, we use geometric analysis algorithms
                 to study the shapes and contacts of those fragment
                 boundaries, producing statistical distributions of
                 lengths, angles, areas, and adjacencies found in
                 assembled paintings. The result is a statistical model
                 that suggests a hierarchical fracture pattern where
                 fragments break into two pieces recursively along
                 cracks nearly orthogonal to previous ones. This model
                 is tested by comparing it with simulation results of a
                 hierarchical fracture process. The model could be
                 useful for predicting fracture patterns of other wall
                 paintings and/or for guiding future computer-assisted
                 reconstruction algorithms.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "10",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Semeraro:2012:FBR,
  author =       "Giovanni Semeraro and Pasquale Lops and Marco {De
                 Gemmis} and Cataldo Musto and Fedelucio Narducci",
  title =        "A folksonomy-based recommender system for personalized
                 access to digital artworks",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "5",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "11:1--11:??",
  month =        oct,
  year =         "2012",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2362402.2362405",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Thu Nov 8 18:41:59 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  abstract =     "Museums have recognized the need for supporting
                 visitors in fulfilling a personalized experience when
                 visiting artwork collections, and they have started to
                 adopt recommender systems as a way to meet this
                 requirement. Content-based recommender systems analyze
                 features of artworks previously rated by a visitor and
                 build a visitor model or profile, in which preferences
                 and interests are stored, based on those features. For
                 example, the profile of a visitor might store the names
                 of his or her favorite painters or painting techniques,
                 extracted from short textual descriptions associated
                 with artworks. The user profile is then matched against
                 the attributes of new items in order to provide
                 personalized suggestions. The Web 2.0 (r)evolution has
                 changed the game for personalization from ``elitist''
                 Web 1.0, written by few and read by many, to Web
                 content potentially generated by everyone (
                 user-generated content --- UGC). One of the forms of
                 UGC that has drawn most attention from the research
                 community is folksonomy, a taxonomy generated by users
                 who collaboratively annotate and categorize resources
                 of interests with freely chosen keywords called tags.
                 In this work, we investigate the problem of deciding
                 whether folksonomies might be a valuable source of
                 information about user interests in the context of
                 recommending digital artworks. We present FIRSt
                 (Folksonomy-based Item Recommender syStem), a
                 content-based recommender system which integrates UGC
                 through social tagging in a classic content-based
                 model, letting users express their preferences for
                 items by entering a numerical rating as well as by
                 annotating items with free tags. Experiments show that
                 the accuracy of recommendations increases when tags are
                 exploited in the recommendation process to enrich user
                 profiles, provided that tags are not used as a
                 surrogate for the item descriptions, but in conjunction
                 with them. FIRSt has been developed within the CHAT
                 project ``Cultural Heritage fruition \& e-learning
                 applications of new Advanced (multimodal)
                 Technologies'', and it is the core of a bouquet of Web
                 services designed for personalized museum tours.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "11",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Schreiber:2012:EPL,
  author =       "Stephan Schreiber and Klaus G. Hinzen and Claus
                 Fleischer and Sven Sch{\"u}tte",
  title =        "Excavation-parallel laser scanning of a medieval
                 cesspit in the archaeological zone {Cologne, Germany}",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "5",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "12:1--12:??",
  month =        oct,
  year =         "2012",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2362402.2362406",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Thu Nov 8 18:41:59 MST 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  abstract =     "During the construction of an underground museum in
                 the historic city center of Cologne, Germany, large
                 parts of the Roman and medieval city are being
                 excavated. The newly excavated remains as well as
                 remains of the Roman city, which had already been
                 excavated in 1954, exhibit structural damages. While at
                 first deficiencies in the construction were assumed to
                 be the cause of the damages, in 2003 a seismogenic
                 origin was suggested. To further test this hypothesis
                 of seismically induced slope movements and other
                 possible causes, a multidisciplinary project was
                 started. One step in this project is the documentation
                 of the damages using a 3D laser scanner, followed by a
                 quantitative damage analysis. This article presents the
                 3D documentation and the quantitative damage analysis
                 of a recently excavated medieval cesspit. The 8.3m-deep
                 cesspit was mapped during 11 campaigns using a
                 phase-based 3D laser scanner. Due to the static
                 conditions of the cesspit, the structure could not be
                 excavated in its entirety. After the excavation of
                 every 1-2m-section, restoration work had to be done to
                 avoid a collapse of the construction. The laser
                 scanning technique offered the possibility of working
                 parallel to the excavation so the original conditions
                 of each section could be documented before the
                 restoration. The resulting models were used to
                 identify, classify, and quantify the structural damages
                 of the cesspit.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "12",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Laycock:2012:CXR,
  author =       "Stephen D. Laycock and Graham D. Bell and David B.
                 Mortimore and Mark K. Greco and Nick Corps and Irving
                 Finkle",
  title =        "Combining {X-ray} micro-{CT} technology and {$3$D}
                 printing for the digital preservation and study of a
                 {19th Century Cantonese} chess piece with intricate
                 internal structure",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "5",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "13:1--13:??",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2012",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2399180.2399181",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Sat Jun 22 11:55:20 MDT 2013",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  abstract =     "Laser scanning has been widely adopted for the digital
                 preservation and study of cultural heritage artifacts.
                 However, surface scans alone are not sufficient for a
                 variety of intricate objects such as the Cantonese
                 chess pieces that were delicately carved from ivory
                 throughout the 19th Century. These pieces incorporate a
                 puzzle ball base, which is comprised of several balls,
                 one inside the other. In this project we explore the
                 use of X-ray micro-CT technology to scan the piece with
                 a voxel separation of less than 9 $ \mu $ m, By using
                 masking and editing software we generate 3D surface
                 models of the separate parts to enable close inspection
                 of both exterior and interior sections. Visualizing the
                 dataset at a much larger scale enables the viewer to
                 appreciate the fine surface details imperceivable in
                 the original piece. Finally, 3D scaled versions are
                 printed where the small details are also easily
                 observed and the inner balls within the puzzle ball
                 base move freely. The work flow demonstrated in this
                 article has important possibilities in digital
                 preservation, documentation, and presentation.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "13",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Matthews:2012:IME,
  author =       "Paul Matthews and Judith Aston",
  title =        "Interactive multimedia ethnography: Archiving
                 workflow, interface aesthetics and metadata",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "5",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "14:1--14:??",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2012",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2399180.2399182",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Sat Jun 22 11:55:20 MDT 2013",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  abstract =     "Digital heritage archives often lack engaging user
                 interfaces that strike a balance between providing
                 narrative context and affording user interaction and
                 exploration. It seems nevertheless feasible for
                 metadata tagging and a ``joined up'' workflow to
                 provide a basis for such rich interaction. After
                 outlining relevant research from within and outside the
                 heritage domain, we present our project, FINE (Fluid
                 Interfaces for Narrative Exploration), an effort to
                 develop such a system. Based on content from Wendy
                 James' archive of anthropological research material
                 from the Sudan/Ethiopian borderlands, the FINE project
                 attempts to use structural and thematic metadata to
                 drive exploratory interfaces which link video, images,
                 audio, and text to relevant narrative units. The
                 interfaces also benefit from the temporal and spatial
                 variety of the collection to provide opportunities to
                 discover contrasts and juxtaposition in the material
                 across place and time.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "14",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Makridis:2012:ACA,
  author =       "Michael Makridis and Petros Daras",
  title =        "Automatic classification of archaeological pottery
                 sherds",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "5",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "15:1--15:??",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2012",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2399180.2399183",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Sat Jun 22 11:55:20 MDT 2013",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  abstract =     "This article presents a novel technique for automatic
                 archaeological sherd classification. Sherds that are
                 found in the field usually have little to no visible
                 textual information such as symbols, graphs, or marks
                 on them. This makes manual classification an extremely
                 difficult and time-consuming task for conservators and
                 archaeologists. For a bunch of sherds found in the
                 field, an expert identifies different classes and
                 indicates at least one representative sherd for each
                 class (training sample). The proposed technique uses
                 the representative sherds in order to correctly
                 classify the remaining sherds. For each sherd, local
                 features based on color and texture information are
                 extracted and are then transformed into a global vector
                 that describes the whole sherd image, using a new bag
                 of words technique. Finally, a feature selection
                 algorithm is applied that locates features with high
                 discriminative power. Extensive experiments were
                 performed in order to verify the effectiveness of the
                 proposed technique and show very promising results.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "15",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Aletras:2012:CSB,
  author =       "Nikolaos Aletras and Mark Stevenson and Paul Clough",
  title =        "Computing similarity between items in a digital
                 library of cultural heritage",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "5",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "16:1--16:??",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2012",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2399180.2399184",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Sat Jun 22 11:55:20 MDT 2013",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  abstract =     "Large amounts of cultural heritage content have now
                 been digitized and are available in digital libraries.
                 However, these are often unstructured and difficult to
                 navigate. Automatic techniques for identifying similar
                 items in these collections could be used to improve
                 navigation since it would allow items that are
                 implicitly connected to be linked together and allow
                 sets of similar items to be clustered. Europeana is a
                 large digital library containing more than 20 million
                 digital objects from a set of cultural heritage
                 providers throughout Europe. The diverse nature of this
                 collection means that the items do not have standard
                 metadata to assist navigation. A range of methods for
                 computing the similarity between pairs of texts are
                 applied to metadata records in Europeana in order to
                 estimate the similarity between items. Various methods
                 for computing similarity have been proposed and can be
                 classified into two main approaches: (1)
                 knowledge-based, which make use of external knowledge
                 sources and (2) corpus-based approaches, which rely on
                 analyzing the frequency distributions of words in
                 documents. Both techniques are evaluated against manual
                 judgements obtained for this study and a
                 multiple-choice test created from manually generated
                 categories in cultural heritage collections. We find
                 that a combination of corpus and knowledge-based
                 approaches provide the best results in both
                 experiments.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "16",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Bellotti:2012:SGM,
  author =       "Francesco Bellotti and Riccardo Berta and Alessandro
                 De Gloria and Annamaria D'ursi and Valentina Fiore",
  title =        "A serious game model for cultural heritage",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "5",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "17:1--17:??",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "2012",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2399180.2399185",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Sat Jun 22 11:55:20 MDT 2013",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  abstract =     "Serious games present a promising opportunity for
                 learning, but the genre still lacks methodologies and
                 tools for efficient and low-cost production,
                 particularly for teacher and domain experts. This
                 article gives an authoring framework that aims to
                 provide structured support, from content design to
                 final implementation. In particular, we have abstracted
                 a conceptual model-the SandBox Serious Game --- which
                 relies on a generalization of task-based learning
                 theory. The model invites players to perform cognitive
                 tasks contextually while exploring information-rich
                 virtual environments. We consider it particularly
                 suited for cultural heritage entertainment
                 applications. The model defines games that are set in
                 realistic virtual worlds enriched with embedded
                 educational tasks, which we have implemented as
                 minigames. This approach simplifies the authoring work,
                 which can easily be supported by visual authoring tools
                 for ontology-based urban 3D modeling and implementation
                 tasks, thus allowing an approach similar to the
                 mind-maps concept. We propose a top-down methodology
                 for content preparation, starting from a city-level
                 analysis down to the single points of interest and
                 associated tasks, which are instances of simple
                 predefined minigame/quiz typologies. We provide
                 examples and discuss criteria for selecting task
                 typologies according to the authors' cognitive targets.
                 Finally, we discuss the results of a user test, which
                 took place in a lab, aimed at verifying the acquisition
                 of cultural heritage knowledge in a pleasant and
                 engaging way. Games appear particularly suited for
                 supporting the study of images, especially of
                 iconography. Compared to reading text, a game forces
                 the player to focus more strongly on problems, which
                 favors knowledge acquisition and retention. Learning
                 complex concepts requires an investigative attitude,
                 which can be spurred by well-designed games. Good
                 design involves usability, graphic appeal, appropriate
                 content, and the presence of connections which a player
                 must discover in the content. Players should be asked
                 to pay attention to and reason about their whole game
                 activity --- including the relationships between the
                 game content, the brief introduction, and concluding
                 texts. More comprehensive tests are needed to better
                 investigate the educational effectiveness-however, the
                 first results are promising, especially in terms of
                 user motivation and creation of new opportunities for
                 learning about CH.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "17",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Scopigno:2013:E,
  author =       "Roberto Scopigno",
  title =        "Editorial",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "6",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "1:1--1:??",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2013",
  CODEN =        "????",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Sat Jun 22 11:55:25 MDT 2013",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "1",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Yannopoulos:2013:DAT,
  author =       "Angelos Yannopoulos",
  title =        "{DirectorNotation}: Artistic and technological system
                 for professional film directing",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "6",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "2:1--2:??",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2013",
  CODEN =        "????",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Sat Jun 22 11:55:25 MDT 2013",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  abstract =     "DirectorNotation (DN) is a symbolic language intended
                 to express the content of film (motion pictures), much
                 as notes provide a language for the writing of music.
                 It thus constitutes a new approach to the creative
                 process of filmmaking. Musicians, and also
                 choreographers, have long been able to express their
                 creative choices using logical symbolic structures
                 (music notation and dance notation), yet those working
                 in the movie industry have to rely on cartoons and
                 verbal description. Development of a successful
                 notation becomes appropriate today because of its
                 dependence upon the parallel development of effective
                 notation-based software tools such as visualisation
                 (automatic animated storyboard generation), production
                 budget estimation, and automated rough editing of
                 dailies. Directors maintain complete control of their
                 creative decisions when using DN. It is an artistic
                 language supported by technical tools for planning and
                 analysis. The notation is not merely a graphical user
                 interface for these tools, and the tools are never
                 intended to make decisions for the director. This
                 article introduces DN, argues its great cultural
                 significance, provides market research results showing
                 directors' interest in using it, and reports on two
                 controlled experiments confirming its
                 effectiveness-including its usability in a practical
                 context and its ability to represent and communicate
                 the necessary information.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "2",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Kolomenkin:2013:RRO,
  author =       "Michael Kolomenkin and George Leifman and Ilan
                 Shimshoni and Ayellet Tal",
  title =        "Reconstruction of relief objects from archeological
                 line drawings",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "6",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "3:1--3:??",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2013",
  CODEN =        "????",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Sat Jun 22 11:55:25 MDT 2013",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  abstract =     "This article addresses the problem of automatic
                 reconstruction of a 3D relief object from a line
                 drawing. Our main application is reconstruction of
                 archaeological artifacts based on line drawings. The
                 problem is challenging due to five reasons: the small
                 number of orthogonal views of the object, the sparsity
                 of the strokes, their ambiguity, their large number,
                 and their interrelations. We partition the
                 reconstruction problem into two subproblems. First, we
                 reconstruct the underlying smooth base of the object
                 from the silhouette. Assuming that the variation of
                 bases belonging to the same class of objects is
                 relatively small, we create the base by modifying a
                 similar base retrieved from a database. Second, we
                 reconstruct the relief on top of the base. Our approach
                 can reconstruct the relief from a complex drawing that
                 consists of many interrelated strokes. Rather than
                 viewing the interdependencies as a problem, we show how
                 they can be exploited to automatically generate a good
                 initial interpretation of the line drawing. Even though
                 our algorithm is generic, its strength is demonstrated
                 by the reconstruction of artifacts from manual drawings
                 taken from real archaeological reports. These drawings
                 are highly challenging, since artists created very
                 complex and detailed descriptions of artifacts
                 regardless of any considerations concerning their
                 future use for shape reconstruction.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "3",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Zohar:2013:ATC,
  author =       "Hadas Zohar and Chaya Liebeskind and Jonathan Schler
                 and Ido Dagan",
  title =        "Automatic thesaurus construction for cross generation
                 corpus",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "6",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "4:1--4:??",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2013",
  CODEN =        "????",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Sat Jun 22 11:55:25 MDT 2013",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  abstract =     "This article describes methods for semiautomatic
                 thesaurus construction, for a cross generation, cross
                 genre, and cross cultural corpus. Semiautomatic
                 thesaurus construction is a complex task, and applying
                 it on a cross generation corpus brings its own
                 challenges. We used a Jewish juristic corpus containing
                 documents and genres that were written across 2000
                 years, and contain a mix of different languages,
                 dialects, geographies, and writing styles. We evaluated
                 different first and second order methods, and
                 introduced a special annotation scheme for this
                 problem, which showed that first order methods
                 performed surprisingly well. We found that in our case,
                 improving the coverage is the more difficult task, for
                 this we introduce a new algorithm to increase recall
                 (coverage)-which is applicable to many other problems
                 as well, and demonstrates significant improvement in
                 our corpus.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "4",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Mv:2013:CFP,
  author =       "Rohith Mv and Gowri Somanath and Debra Norris and
                 Jennifer Gutierrez and Chandra Kambhamettu",
  title =        "A camera flash projector-based reconstruction system
                 for digital preservation of artifacts",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "6",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "5:1--5:??",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2013",
  CODEN =        "????",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Sat Jun 22 11:55:25 MDT 2013",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  abstract =     "Computer vision techniques have been applied for rapid
                 and accurate structure recovery in many fields. Most
                 methods perform poorly in areas containing little or no
                 texture and in the presence of repetitive patterns. We
                 present a portable, cost-effective pattern projector
                 system powered by the flash of a camera, to aid the
                 reconstruction of such areas. No calibration is
                 required between the camera-projector, projector-scene,
                 or pattern. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our
                 system on various representative surfaces like stone,
                 metal, clay, porcelain, and natural fibers, with
                 different inherent colors/textures. A pipeline is
                 presented to automatically generate textured,
                 true-scale metric models, that can be used for
                 quantitative studies or visualization. The
                 practicability of our system is explored in the
                 specific area of digital archiving of historically
                 significant objects. We show results from field trips
                 to 12th century temples at Belur and Halebidu in South
                 India and objects from the Wintherthur museum,
                 Delaware, USA.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "5",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Mortara:2013:ISI,
  author =       "Michela Mortara and Francesco Bellotti",
  title =        "Introduction to special issue on serious games for
                 cultural heritage",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "6",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "6:1--6:??",
  month =        may,
  year =         "2013",
  CODEN =        "????",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Sat Jun 22 11:55:30 MDT 2013",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "6",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Froschauer:2013:AHC,
  author =       "Josef Froschauer and Dieter Merkl and Max Arends and
                 Doron Goldfarb",
  title =        "Art history concepts at play with {ThIATRO}",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "6",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "7:1--7:??",
  month =        may,
  year =         "2013",
  CODEN =        "????",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Sat Jun 22 11:55:30 MDT 2013",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  abstract =     "Games have become an integral part of today's culture,
                 most obviously among younger people. At the same time,
                 learning games have proved that they can be a source of
                 enjoyment and are, if well-made, powerful tools for
                 communicating knowledge. For cultural heritage projects
                 targeted to raising the awareness of the general
                 public, the integration of interactivity and innovative
                 storytelling techniques can be supporting elements to
                 capture their target audiences' enthusiasm. In
                 particular, games that deal with art history have
                 particular flaws in integrating motivating elements.
                 This observation led us to the development of the 3D
                 online learning game, ThIATRO, that immerses the player
                 an exhibition and, as a side-effect communicates
                 knowledge of art history concepts to the player. Its
                 playful approach not only increases motivation to learn
                 but also raises interest in art history and cultural
                 heritage in general. We provide an overview of the
                 design ideas behind ThIATRO and summarize the results
                 of evaluations conducted with a group of 14-year-old
                 pupils in a classroom environment. The results indicate
                 that ThIATRO changes the player's aesthetic response
                 and allows him or her to perceive art on a deeper
                 level.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "7",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Coenen:2013:MCS,
  author =       "Tanguy Coenen and Lien Mostmans and Kris Naessens",
  title =        "{MuseUs}: {Case} study of a pervasive cultural
                 heritage serious game",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "6",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "8:1--8:??",
  month =        may,
  year =         "2013",
  CODEN =        "????",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Sat Jun 22 11:55:30 MDT 2013",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  abstract =     "This article describes a case study on MuseUs, a
                 pervasive serious game for use in museums, running as a
                 smartphone app. During the museum visit, players are
                 invited to create their own exposition and are guided
                 by the application in doing so. The aim is to provide a
                 learning effect during a visit to a museum exhibition.
                 Central to the MuseUs experience is that it does not
                 necessitate a predefined path trough the museum and
                 that it does not draw the attention away from the
                 exposition itself. Also, the application stimulates the
                 visitor to look at cultural heritage elements in a
                 different way, permitting the construction of personal
                 narratives while creating a personal exposition. Using
                 a methodology derived from action research, we present
                 recommendations for the design of similar applications
                 and conclude by proposing a high-level architecture for
                 pervasive serious games applied to cultural heritage.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "8",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Huang:2013:ASB,
  author =       "Chih-Hong Huang and Yi-Ting Huang",
  title =        "An {Annales School}-based serious game creation
                 framework for {Taiwanese} indigenous cultural
                 heritage",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "6",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "9:1--9:??",
  month =        may,
  year =         "2013",
  CODEN =        "????",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Sat Jun 22 11:55:30 MDT 2013",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  abstract =     "This study utilizes the characteristics of the Annales
                 School, including their emphasis on total history and
                 space and time integration, their focus on the economic
                 world, and their use of structural analysis to develop
                 a creation framework for a serious video game related
                 to the cultural and life history of Taiwan's indigenous
                 people. Game development comprised the tiers of data,
                 logic, and presentation. During the data tier, we used
                 taxonomy to extract the cultural components of Taiwan's
                 Atayal tribe. During the logic tier, we employed an
                 analysis of cultural characteristics and comparisons of
                 historical education goals to confirm the game's
                 framework and storytelling engine, selecting a
                 construction management simulation game genre to
                 present tribal life and economic operations. Finally,
                 in the presentation tier, we converted cultural
                 components into elements in the game's user interface.
                 The game evaluation results showed that ``Papakwaqa''
                 (our serious game) had positive benefits for enhancing
                 schoolchildren's learning motivation and performance
                 regarding indigenous life and history. Our research
                 verified that integrating the cross-disciplinary
                 methods of anthropologists, history teachers, tribal
                 elders, and game designers to establish instructional
                 goals and design foci for game development and to
                 create a cultural heritage serious game-creation
                 framework warrants further study and effort.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "9",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Mori:2013:EAD,
  author =       "Daniele Mori and Riccardo Berta and Alessandro {De
                 Gloria} and Valentina Fiore and Lauto Magnani",
  title =        "An easy to author dialogue management system for
                 serious games",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "6",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "10:1--10:??",
  month =        may,
  year =         "2013",
  CODEN =        "????",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Sat Jun 22 11:55:30 MDT 2013",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  abstract =     "This article describes an architecture for a dialogue
                 management system to be employed in serious games for
                 natural language interaction with nonplayer characters.
                 The aim of this work is to improve the learning
                 experience by enhancing the immersiveness felt by the
                 player. The system is implemented in a Service Oriented
                 Architecture perspective and it exposes its
                 functionalities through Web services. It also provides
                 an easy to use authoring tool, which allows cultural
                 heritage experts to define the character's knowledge
                 without the need for learning a scripting language. We
                 tested the system by embedding it in a simple serious
                 game, where the user could interact with the virtual
                 representation of a XVI century Geneoese artist, Luca
                 Cambiaso, in order to acquire knowledge about his life
                 and artworks. These early lab test results showed a
                 high level of appreciation for the usability of the
                 system and for the user engagement. Tests also showed
                 that the system is a good didactic tool, since players
                 demonstrated a similar level of knowledge acquisition
                 to that achieved by reading a text.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "10",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Schwartz:2013:WBS,
  author =       "Christopher Schwartz and Roland Ruiters and Michael
                 Weinmann and Reinhard Klein",
  title =        "{WebGL}-based streaming and presentation of objects
                 with bidirectional texture functions",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "6",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "11:1--11:??",
  month =        jul,
  year =         "2013",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2499931.2499932",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Thu Mar 13 11:30:09 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  abstract =     "Museums and Cultural Heritage institutions have a
                 growing interest in presenting their collections to a
                 broader community via the Internet. The photo-realistic
                 presentation of interactively inspectable virtual
                 surrogates is one of the most challenging problems in
                 this field. For this purpose, we seek to employ not
                 only a 3D geometry but also a powerful material
                 representation capable of reproducing the full visual
                 appeal of an object. In this article, we propose a
                 WebGL-based presentation framework in which reflectance
                 information is represented via Bidirectional Texture
                 Functions (BTF). Our approach works out-of-the-box in
                 modern Web browsers and allows for the progressive
                 transmission and interactive rendering of digitized
                 artifacts consisting of 3D geometry and reflectance
                 information. We handle the huge amount of data needed
                 for this representation by employing a novel
                 progressive streaming approach for BTFs, which allows
                 for the smooth interactive inspection of a steadily
                 improving version during the download. We demonstrate
                 an interesting use-case of this technique at a cross
                 section of Cultural Heritage, medical education, and
                 research and provide an evaluation of the capabilities
                 of our framework in the scope of BTF compression and
                 transmission.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "11",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Suominen:2013:GLF,
  author =       "Jaakko Suominen and Anna Sivula",
  title =        "Gaming legacy? {Four} approaches to the relation
                 between cultural heritage and digital technology",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "6",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "12:1--12:??",
  month =        jul,
  year =         "2013",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2499931.2499933",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Thu Mar 13 11:30:09 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  abstract =     "Digital gaming and digital technologies have their own
                 unique cultural history while at the same time, the
                 cultural heritage of digital technology is emerging.
                 Digital technology has been understood as merely an
                 apparatus that can be utilized for transferring
                 nondigital historical content to novel digital
                 products. These products, including types such as
                 multimedia shows, games, Web sites, and online course
                 environments, are targeted at juvenile audiences, who
                 are typically considered to be the primary users of
                 such new media forms. For decades, the changes and new
                 continuities in both mediated content and the
                 technology of mediation were mostly hidden in the
                 shadow of educational goal-attainment. This article
                 draws inspiration from ideas on media archaeology and
                 the cultures of history. In this article we suggest an
                 approach of internal and external cultural heritage of
                 games cultures. We introduce a four-fold table
                 regarding the relationship between cultural heritage
                 (or history) and digital technology. The four-fold
                 table consists of the dimension of a researcher's
                 comprehensive/applied goal-attainment and the dimension
                 of the internality/externality of history and cultural
                 heritage in regard to the digital game cultural
                 context. Within these cultures, there are several
                 alternative ways of discussing the relationship between
                 history, cultural heritage, and digital technology,
                 separate from the traditional edutainment perspective.
                 The dimensions are illustrated with practical examples,
                 including a typologization of historiographical
                 computer games, retrogaming, and educational workshops
                 on game classics.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "12",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Stefani:2013:WPC,
  author =       "Chiara Stefani and Chawee Busayarat and Julie Lombardo
                 and Livio {De Luca} and Philippe V{\'e}ron",
  title =        "A {Web} platform for the consultation of spatialized
                 and semantically enriched iconographic sources on
                 cultural heritage buildings",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "6",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "13:1--13:??",
  month =        jul,
  year =         "2013",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2499931.2499934",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Thu Mar 13 11:30:09 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  abstract =     "This article describes an interactive platform for the
                 semantic annotation of oriented iconographic sources
                 based on an accurate 3D-model structured according to
                 spatial and temporal features. This platform, called
                 LOCUS IMAGINIS, provides access to cultural information
                 about monuments by collecting personal snapshots taken
                 by visitors. In particular, the platform enables to
                 perform two actions. First, pictures are added into the
                 database: visitors manually align images to the digital
                 model of the monument and than, by means of automatic
                 procedures, images are enriched with 2D semantic
                 annotations that are projected from the 3D model.
                 Second, the collection of semantically-enriched data
                 can be queried: when visitors select 2D images of the
                 database, these are oriented in the 3D scene and
                 superimposed onto the 3D-model. In this way, this tool
                 provides access to textual and graphic information
                 describing the photographed site (semantic, spatial,
                 temporal features, etc.). Moreover, visitors can
                 interact both with images and the 3D-model to highlight
                 building parts by color. Accessible onsite and online,
                 this tool can create awareness about conservation and
                 is adapted to all kinds of audience: Students involved
                 in educational workshops, visitors needing to extend
                 their visit, and documentalists interested in the
                 consultation of the iconographic corpus.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "13",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Merry:2013:FPB,
  author =       "Bruce Merry and James Gain and Patrick Marais",
  title =        "Fast in-place binning of laser range-scanned point
                 sets",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "6",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "14:1--14:??",
  month =        jul,
  year =         "2013",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2499931.2499935",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Thu Mar 13 11:30:09 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  abstract =     "Laser range scanning is commonly used in cultural
                 heritage to create digital models of real-world
                 artefacts. A large scanning campaign can produce
                 billions of point samples-too many to be manipulated in
                 memory on most computers. It is thus necessary to
                 spatially partition the data so that it can be
                 processed in bins or slices. We introduce a novel
                 compression mechanism that exploits spatial coherence
                 in the data to allow the bins to be computed with only
                 1.01 bytes of I/O traffic for each byte of input,
                 compared to 2 or more for previous schemes.
                 Additionally, the bins are loaded from the original
                 files for processing rather than from a sorted copy,
                 thus minimizing disk space requirements. We demonstrate
                 that our method yields performance improvements in a
                 typical point-processing task, while also using little
                 memory and guaranteeing an upper bound on the number of
                 samples held in-core.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "14",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Soler:2013:DCH,
  author =       "F. Soler and J. C. Torres and A. J. Le{\'o}n and M. V.
                 Luz{\'o}n",
  title =        "Design of cultural heritage information systems based
                 on information layers",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "6",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "15:1--15:??",
  month =        nov,
  year =         "2013",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2532630.2532631",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Thu Mar 13 11:30:10 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  abstract =     "The information about cultural heritage artifacts that
                 archeologists must manage is usually very
                 heterogeneous, and, due to its spatial nature, cannot
                 be easily represented using conventional data
                 management frameworks. The strong spatial dependence of
                 this data suggests that the information should be
                 linked to a 3D model of the artifact. This article
                 presents a 3D information system that has been designed
                 to manage cultural heritage information. The system
                 allows information layers to be associated with the
                 surface of the artifact, following an approach similar
                 to that used in geographical information systems. This
                 permits relationships between the different elements to
                 be ascertained, and allows both specialists and the
                 layperson to more easily understand the information. We
                 describe here the structure and functionality of the
                 system.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "15",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Woolford:2013:EAG,
  author =       "Kirk Woolford and Stuart Dunn",
  title =        "Experimental archaeology and games: Challenges of
                 inhabiting virtual heritage",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "6",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "16:1--16:??",
  month =        nov,
  year =         "2013",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2532630.2532632",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Thu Mar 13 11:30:10 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  abstract =     "Experimental archaeology has long yielded valuable
                 insights into the tools and techniques that were
                 featured in past peoples' relationships with the
                 material world around them. However, experimental
                 archaeology has, until now, confined itself to rigid,
                 empirical, and quantitative questions. This article
                 applies principles of experimental archaeology and
                 serious gaming tools in the reconstructions of a
                 British Iron Age round house. This article explains a
                 number of experiments conducted to look for
                 quantitative differences in movement in virtual versus
                 material environments, using both ``virtual'' studio
                 reconstruction as well as material reconstruction. The
                 data from these experiments was then analysed to look
                 for differences in movement that could be attributed to
                 artefacts and/or environments. This article also
                 explains the structure of the experiments, how the data
                 was generated, what theories may make sense of the
                 data, what conclusions have been drawn, and how serious
                 gaming tools can support the creation of new
                 experimental heritage environments.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "16",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Antoniou:2013:ASG,
  author =       "Angeliki Antoniou and George Lepouras and Stavroula
                 Bampatzia and Hera Almpanoudi",
  title =        "An approach for serious game development for cultural
                 heritage: Case study for an archaeological site and
                 museum",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "6",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "17:1--17:??",
  month =        nov,
  year =         "2013",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2532630.2532633",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Thu Mar 13 11:30:10 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  abstract =     "The unique aspects of different places seem to require
                 games of different characteristics. This paper
                 describes the initial steps of an attempt to design
                 games for different places of cultural heritage and
                 consists of three parts. In the first part, the
                 descriptive model to be used as a classification method
                 for games of different characteristics for cultural
                 heritage sites is presented. In the second part, the
                 model is used for the creation of different cultural
                 heritage games. Finally, the third part presents a
                 detailed case study of one of the developed games,
                 showing the implementation and user testing processes
                 as well as its efficiency in terms of education and
                 visit motivation.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "17",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Yu:2013:DSC,
  author =       "Chih-Hao Yu and Jane Hunter",
  title =        "Documenting and sharing comparative analyses of {$3$D}
                 digital museum artifacts through {Semantic Web}
                 annotations",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "6",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "18:1--18:??",
  month =        nov,
  year =         "2013",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2532630.2532634",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Thu Mar 13 11:30:10 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  abstract =     "Understanding the similarities, differences, and
                 relationships between cultural heritage artifacts is
                 critical for determining their significance and their
                 provenance. It also provides valuable information for
                 ensuring the long-term preservation of cultural
                 heritage artifacts. Consequently, as more museums
                 develop online three-dimensional (3D) collections,
                 curators and scholars are demanding online tools that
                 enable them to document and interpret variances and
                 similarities between related 3D digital objects. This
                 article describes a system that was developed to enable
                 museum curators and/or scholars to document
                 relationships between multiple 3D digital
                 representations of museum objects using web-based
                 annotation tools. The 3D Semantic Association (3DSA)
                 system enables users to annotate relationships between
                 multiple whole objects, parts of objects, or features
                 on objects (surface features or volumetric segments).
                 The annotations are stored on a server in an
                 interoperable format that can be shared, discovered,
                 browsed, and retrieved through a web browser interface.
                 This approach not only improves scholars' capabilities
                 to undertake cultural heritage research but also
                 enables researchers to document, share, discuss, and
                 compare alternative hypotheses about the relationships
                 between artifacts.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "18",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Calogero:2013:UPM,
  author =       "Erica Calogero and Jaime Kaminski and David Arnold",
  title =        "Using procedural modeling to explore alternative
                 designs for the {Louvre}",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "6",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "19:1--19:??",
  month =        nov,
  year =         "2013",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2532630.2512883",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Thu Mar 13 11:30:10 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  abstract =     "This article presents the process of reconstructing
                 three facade designs for the east wing of the Louvre
                 using procedural modeling. The first proposal
                 reconstructed is Louis Le Vau's 1662 scheme, the second
                 is Gian Lorenzo Bernini's first design, and the third
                 is the 1668 petit conseil design that still stands
                 today. The results show how such reconstructions may
                 aid both a general and an expert understanding of the
                 three designs. It is proposed that by formalizing the
                 facade description into a shape grammar with procedural
                 modeling, a systematized approach to a stylistic
                 analysis is possible. It is also asserted that such an
                 analysis is still best understood within the historical
                 context of what is known about the contemporary design
                 intentions of the building creators and
                 commissioners.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "19",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Hsieh:2014:IPC,
  author =       "Chun-Ko Hsieh and Wen-Ching Liao and Meng-Chieh Yu and
                 Yi-Ping Hung",
  title =        "Interacting with the past: Creating a time perception
                 journey experience using kinect-based breath detection
                 and deterioration and recovery simulation
                 technologies",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "7",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "1:1--1:??",
  month =        feb,
  year =         "2014",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2535937",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Thu Mar 13 11:30:12 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  abstract =     "We propose an application that allows a museum
                 audience to interact with the past and to appreciate
                 the value of antique objects through multimedia
                 installations. Discussions in this article are based on
                 our experiences in developing the Mao-Kung Cauldron
                 time perception journey multimedia application. This
                 installation was inspired by the Mao-Kung Cauldron, an
                 ancient bronze cauldron in the collection of the
                 National Palace Museum known for its historical
                 significance. The question, however, lies in how to
                 create an experience in which the audiences can
                 interact with the past. To address this issue, the
                 research team used the Kinect-based breath detection
                 and deterioration/recovery simulation technologies to
                 develop the application. This installation is the first
                 application linked to Kinect-based breath detection and
                 deterioration/recovery simulation technologies. The
                 main contribution of this work is the analysis of
                 design concepts, design decisions, and evaluations in a
                 museum setting. We conduct a control group study to
                 compare the outcomes between the experimental group
                 (Mao-Kung Cauldron time perception journey multimedia
                 application) and control group (asynchronous web-based
                 kiosk). Both the quantitative (questionnaire survey)
                 and qualitative methods (observation) are used to
                 analyze the collected data. This work proposes a
                 feasibility design to let museum audiences experience
                 the features of cultural object by the virtual time
                 perception journey application.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "1",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Horr:2014:MLB,
  author =       "Christian H{\"o}rr and Elisabeth Lindinger and Guido
                 Brunnett",
  title =        "Machine learning based typology development in
                 archaeology",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "7",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "2:1--2:??",
  month =        apr,
  year =         "2014",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2533988",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Fri Apr 4 18:56:15 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  abstract =     "Formalizing and objectifying the process of artefact
                 classification is an old wish of many archaeologists.
                 On the other hand, data mining in general and machine
                 learning in particular have already inspired many
                 disciplines to introduce new paradigms of data analysis
                 and knowledge discovery. Hence, this article aims for
                 reviving the Typological Debate by adapting approved
                 methods from other fields of science to archaeological
                 data. To this end, we extensively discuss the concept
                 of similarity and assess the suitability of machine
                 learning techniques for the purposes of classification
                 and typology development. Our methodology covers all
                 steps starting from unordered, unlabelled objects to
                 the emergence of a consistent and reusable typology.
                 The application of this process is exemplarily
                 illustrated by classifying the vessels from a Late
                 Bronze Age cemetery in Eastern Saxony. Despite the
                 individual character of these vessels, we achieved
                 class prediction rates of more than 95\%. Such a
                 success was only possible, because we permanently
                 reconciled the output of the learning algorithms with
                 our own expectations in order to identify and eliminate
                 the systematic errors within the typology.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "2",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Isemann:2014:OAI,
  author =       "Daniel Isemann and Khurshid Ahmad",
  title =        "Ontological access to images of fine art",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "7",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "3:1--3:??",
  month =        apr,
  year =         "2014",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2538030",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Fri Apr 4 18:56:15 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  abstract =     "Information retrieval in a knowledge rich domain poses
                 challenges that are different from other domains. The
                 domain of fine arts and cultural heritage is an
                 exemplar of such a domain. The many facets of, and
                 complex interrelations between, works of fine art are
                 not easily addressed by conventional keyword-based
                 approaches or even by structured cataloguing systems.
                 Information retrieval challenges in this domain
                 include: the conversion of existing legacy data into
                 knowledge representations that emulate the semantics of
                 the domain's relationships; and easy access to a robust
                 knowledge representation for users unfamiliar with
                 query languages. Our research addresses aspects of both
                 challenges as they are connected and may benefit from
                 being addressed in conjunction. Based on a study on
                 user preferences in art image search and a review of
                 existing structured resources for cataloguing art and
                 heritage information, we have developed two prototypes:
                 Ontology Populator and Artfinder. The first prototype,
                 Ontology Populator, is used to automatically enrich
                 data akin to legacy data kept by heritage institutions
                 and transform it into a knowledge base. The second
                 prototype is a graphical query builder, Artfinder,
                 which interacts with the knowledge base. The Artfinder
                 interface, is constructed dynamically from the
                 structure of the underlying knowledge. A task-based
                 evaluation of Artfinder was carried out with 10 expert
                 and 10 layperson evaluators. Participants reviewed the
                 interface favourably and the evaluation also revealed
                 potential for improvement. Artfinder and its ``query
                 logic,'' perhaps is a semantically richer mode of
                 accessing knowledge repositories, allowing for
                 logically more complex queries than are currently
                 supported outside the realm of dedicated query
                 languages. We believe that domain experts and perhaps
                 informed laypersons will benefit from this retrieval
                 approach.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "3",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Chen:2014:ICH,
  author =       "Gen-Fang Chen",
  title =        "Intangible cultural heritage preservation: an
                 exploratory study of digitization of the historical
                 literature of {Chinese Kunqu} opera librettos",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "7",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "4:1--4:??",
  month =        apr,
  year =         "2014",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2583114",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Fri Apr 4 18:56:15 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  abstract =     "This article introduces the study contents and some
                 research findings regarding digital preservation
                 methods for Chinese Kunqu opera libretto historical
                 literature, including historical literature electronic
                 libretto transformation, libretto musical score image
                 segmentation, musical information recognition, musical
                 score information representation, musical score
                 information storage, and libretto reconstruction on the
                 Web. It proposes a novel editable text method to
                 represent the multidimensional tree-like information
                 structure of the Kunqu libretto literature and a
                 musical semantic annotation method based on numbered
                 musical notation to accommodate the musical features of
                 Kunqu librettos. To maintain the characteristics of the
                 original Kunqu musical notation, it proposes a method
                 to reconstruct Kunqu libretto on the Web based on
                 scalable vector graphics. Some Kunqu librettos were
                 randomly selected for experiments, and the results
                 demonstrated that the editable text method and the
                 musical semantic annotation method were able to fully
                 represent the effective information of the Kunqu
                 libretto literature and that the method to reconstruct
                 librettos on the Web was able to reflect the writing
                 characteristics of the musical notation in the original
                 librettos. Finally, it discusses the primary future
                 research directions related to digital Kunqu, including
                 Kunqu libretto metadata research, corpus construction
                 for the librettos and Qupai (the unique ancient Chinese
                 tune mode), libretto music information disambiguation
                 research, libretto image segmentation and pattern
                 recognition, digital Kunqu roles, digital Kunqu stages,
                 digital Kunqu costume suitcases, virtual Kunqu,
                 digitization and restoration of Kunqu cultural relics,
                 and Kunqu 's application prospects in conventional
                 media such as animation, anime, and movies.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "4",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Kavelar:2014:RLR,
  author =       "Albert Kavelar and Sebastian Zambanini and Martin
                 Kampel",
  title =        "Reading the legends of {Roman Republican} coins",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "7",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "5:1--5:??",
  month =        apr,
  year =         "2014",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2583115",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Fri Apr 4 18:56:15 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  abstract =     "Coin classification is one of the main aspects of
                 numismatics. The introduction of an automated
                 image-based coin classification system could assist
                 numismatists in their everyday work and allow hobby
                 numismatists to gain additional information on their
                 coin collection by uploading images to a respective Web
                 site. For Roman Republican coins, the inscription is
                 one of the most significant features, and its
                 recognition is an essential part in the successful
                 research of an image-based coin recognition system.
                 This article presents a novel way for the recognition
                 of ancient Roman Republican coin legends. Traditional
                 optical character recognition (OCR) strategies were
                 designed for printed or handwritten texts and rely on
                 binarization in the course of their recognition
                 process. Since coin legends are simply embossed onto a
                 piece of metal, they are of the same color as the
                 background and binarization becomes error prone and
                 prohibits the use of standard OCR. Therefore, the
                 proposed method is based on state-of-the-art scene text
                 recognition methods that are rooted in object
                 recognition. S ift descriptors are computed for a dense
                 grid of keypoints and are tested using support vector
                 machines trained for each letter of the respective
                 alphabet. Each descriptor receives a score for every
                 letter, and the use of pictorial structures allows one
                 to detect the optimal configuration for the lexicon
                 words within an image; the word causing the lowest
                 costs is recognized. Character and word recognition
                 capabilities of the proposed method are evaluated
                 individually; character recognition is benchmarked on
                 three and word recognition on different datasets.
                 Depending on the Sift configuration, lexicon, and
                 dataset used, the word recognition rates range from
                 29\% to 67\%.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "5",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Hachet:2014:ISI,
  author =       "Martin Hachet",
  title =        "Introduction to Special Issue on Interacting with the
                 Past",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "7",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "6e:1--6e:??",
  month =        jul,
  year =         "2014",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2635671",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Mon Jul 21 16:23:33 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "6e",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Ridel:2014:RFI,
  author =       "Brett Ridel and Patrick Reuter and Jeremy Laviole and
                 Nicolas Mellado and Nadine Couture and Xavier Granier",
  title =        "The Revealing Flashlight: Interactive Spatial
                 Augmented Reality for Detail Exploration of Cultural
                 Heritage Artifacts",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "7",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "6:1--6:??",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2014",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2611376",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Fri Jun 20 17:32:46 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  abstract =     "Cultural heritage artifacts often contain details that
                 are difficult to distinguish due to aging effects such
                 as erosion. We propose the revealing flashlight, a new
                 interaction and visualization technique in spatial
                 augmented reality that helps to reveal the detail of
                 such artifacts. We locally and interactively augment a
                 physical artifact by projecting an expressive 3D
                 visualization that highlights its features, based on an
                 analysis of its previously acquired geometry at
                 multiple scales. Our novel interaction technique
                 simulates and improves the behavior of a flashlight:
                 according to 6-degree-of-freedom input, we adjust the
                 numerous parameters involved in the expressive
                 visualization-in addition to specifying the location to
                 be augmented. This makes advanced 3D analysis
                 accessible to the greater public with an everyday
                 gesture, by naturally combining the inspection of the
                 real object and the virtual object in a colocated
                 interaction and visualization space. The revealing
                 flashlight can be used by archeologists, for example,
                 to help decipher inscriptions in eroded stones, or by
                 museums to let visitors interactively discover the
                 geometric details and meta-information of cultural
                 artifacts. We confirm its effectiveness, ease of use,
                 and ease of learning in an initial preliminary user
                 study and by the feedback of two public exhibitions.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "6",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Durand:2014:RSP,
  author =       "Emmanuel Durand and Frederic Merienne and Christian
                 Pere and Patrick Callet",
  title =        "Ray-on, an On-Site Photometric Augmented Reality
                 Device",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "7",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "7:1--7:??",
  month =        jul,
  year =         "2014",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2629485",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Mon Jul 21 16:23:33 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  abstract =     "As buildings from ancient times wither away or are
                 transformed or destroyed, it becomes increasingly
                 difficult to figure what it looked like back then.
                 Virtual reality is a great tool to handle this role,
                 although it often implies a three-dimensional model of
                 a building disconnected from the remains. In this
                 article, we present an on-site device dedicated to
                 architectural heritage, which uses realistic
                 photometric rendering associated with the reproduction
                 of the user's point of view in the virtual scene to
                 immerse him in the uchronic virtual world while
                 maintaining the link to the real site. This design is
                 already in use at the old church of Cluny (France),
                 where is it was welcomed by tourists and guides.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "7",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Kenderdine:2014:PLF,
  author =       "Sarah Kenderdine and Leith K. Y. Chan and Jeffrey
                 Shaw",
  title =        "{Pure Land}: Futures for Embodied Museography",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "7",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "8:1--8:??",
  month =        jul,
  year =         "2014",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2614567",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Mon Jul 21 16:23:33 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  abstract =     "This article describes the design and implementation
                 of the Pure Land projects, consisting of two
                 visualization systems and their respective
                 applications, Pure Land: Inside the Mogao Grottoes at
                 Dunhuang [2012] and Pure Land Augmented Reality Edition
                 [2012]. Each installation allows participants to engage
                 in different ways with a full-scale augmented digital
                 facsimile of Cave 220 from the UNESCO World Heritage
                 site of the Mogao Grottoes, Gansu Province,
                 northwestern China. This project is a collaboration
                 between the Applied Laboratory for Interactive
                 Visualization and Embodiment (ALiVE), City University
                 of Hong Kong, and the Dunhuang Academy. In the Pure
                 Land projects, the digital facsimiles of this cultural
                 paragon have been transformed, providing formative
                 personal experiences for museum visitors. The projects
                 integrate high-resolution digital archeological
                 datasets (photography and 3D architectural models) with
                 immersive, interactive display systems. This work is of
                 great importance because the treasuries of paintings
                 and sculptures at Dunhuang are extremely vulnerable to
                 human presence and, in the case of Cave 220,
                 permanently closed to public visitors. Comprehensive
                 digitization has become a primary method of
                 preservation at the site. Both installations have been
                 shown to the public at a variety of museums and
                 galleries worldwide-to critical acclaim. The projects
                 contribute to new strategies for rendering cultural
                 content and heritage landscapes and suggest the future
                 for embodied museography. Here, each project is
                 described in detail, including innovations in interface
                 technological application and user experience.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "8",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Pietroni:2014:IVR,
  author =       "Eva Pietroni and Andrea Adami",
  title =        "Interacting with Virtual Reconstructions in Museums:
                 {The Etruscanning Project}",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "7",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "9:1--9:??",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2014",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2611375",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Fri Jun 20 17:32:46 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  abstract =     "Starting from our experience in this domain, we
                 discuss some fundamental concepts about the
                 potentialities of the virtual reconstructions of
                 cultural sites inside museums, with a specific focus on
                 the communication needs, the design, the combination of
                 media, the interaction interfaces, and the embodiment.
                 We conceive a virtual reconstruction as a digital
                 ecosystem, whose main peculiarities are (1) 3D
                 reconstruction, (2) inclusivity, and (3) interactivity.
                 A virtual reconstruction, in a wide sense, should
                 integrate different levels of visualization, both
                 realistic and symbolic; 3D models; metadata;
                 storytelling; behaviors; and tools of visualization and
                 interaction, in order to ``reconstruct'' and
                 communicate a cultural context, an ecosystem where all
                 the information is integrated. Despite the great
                 advancements of the last years in the digitization
                 process, computer graphics techniques, and archiving
                 strategies, a basic limit of most of virtual museums is
                 that they do not fire up the attention and the
                 involvement of the public: they lack stimulating
                 activities for visitors, narratives metaphors, and
                 emotional impact. The interaction interfaces are not
                 always simple to understand and to control in a few
                 minutes, and they can generate a sense of frustration
                 that causes users to abandon the application after a
                 short and superficial approach. No gap should exist
                 between knowledge and communication. But how can we
                 translate the complexity of the knowledge in appealing
                 to users and into simple applications that fit with the
                 public's need? This article focuses on some
                 communication rules and criteria that are often
                 considered of minor importance by the researchers
                 working in the field of digital cultural heritage but
                 that are really essential to cultural transmission,
                 especially inside museums. We believe that a stronger
                 collaboration between research institutions and museums
                 and among different disciplines would be recommended.
                 Given this premise, we present the Etruscanning EU
                 project, developed in 2011--2013, focused on the
                 virtual reconstruction of two important Etruscan tombs
                 of the Orientalizing period: the Regolini-Galassi tomb
                 in Cerveteri and the tomb n.5 of Monte Michele in
                 Veii.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "9",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Manitsaris:2014:CMR,
  author =       "S. Manitsaris and A. Glushkova and F. Bevilacqua and
                 F. Moutarde",
  title =        "Capture, Modeling, and Recognition of Expert Technical
                 Gestures in Wheel-Throwing Art of Pottery",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "7",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "10:1--10:??",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2014",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2627729",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Fri Jun 20 17:32:46 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  abstract =     "This research has been conducted in the context of the
                 ArtiMuse project that aims at the modeling and renewal
                 of rare gestural knowledge and skills involved in the
                 traditional craftsmanship and more precisely in the art
                 of wheel-throwing pottery. These knowledge and skills
                 constitute intangible cultural heritage and refer to
                 the fruit of diverse expertise founded and propagated
                 over the centuries thanks to the ingeniousness of the
                 gesture and the creativity of the human spirit.
                 Nowadays, this expertise is very often threatened with
                 disappearance because of the difficulty to resist
                 globalization and the fact that most of those
                 ``expertise holders'' are not easily accessible due to
                 geographical or other constraints. In this article, a
                 methodological framework for capturing and modeling
                 gestural knowledge and skills in wheel-throwing pottery
                 is proposed. It is based on capturing gestures using
                 wireless inertial sensors and statistical modeling. In
                 particular, we used a system that allows for online
                 alignment of gestures using a modified Hidden Markov
                 Model. This methodology is implemented into a
                 human--computer interface, which permits both the
                 modeling and recognition of expert technical gestures.
                 This system could be used to assist in the learning of
                 these gestures by giving continuous feedback in real
                 time by measuring the difference between expert and
                 learner gestures. The system has been tested and
                 evaluated on different potters with rare expertise,
                 which is strongly related to their local identity.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "10",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Baldissini:2014:IAP,
  author =       "S. Baldissini and M. Gaiani",
  title =        "Interacting with the {Andrea Palladio Works}: The
                 History of {Palladian} Information System Interfaces",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "7",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "11:1--11:??",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2014",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2611374",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Fri Jun 20 17:32:46 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  abstract =     "This article describes the evolution of an information
                 system (IS) of Centro Internazionale di Studi di
                 Architettura Andrea Palladio di Vicenza and the related
                 interfaces from the first standalone on a CD-ROM system
                 to the current web-based and georeferenced solution.
                 The goal of these ISs was manifold: the dissemination,
                 study, and analysis of architectural history. The IS
                 was designed for many types of users. Mainly, we
                 present the interface and the interaction techniques
                 that were conceived and developed for large audiences
                 during expositions, in the museum, or at home. This
                 article presents a special focus on communicative
                 language changes and on the level of information
                 provided, which are determined by the different
                 interfaces adopted over time.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "11",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Marton:2014:IIV,
  author =       "Fabio Marton and Marcos Balsa Rodriguez and Fabio
                 Bettio and Marco Agus and Alberto Jaspe Villanueva and
                 Enrico Gobbetti",
  title =        "{IsoCam}: Interactive Visual Exploration of Massive
                 Cultural Heritage Models on Large Projection Setups",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "7",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "12:1--12:??",
  month =        jul,
  year =         "2014",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2611519",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Mon Jul 21 16:23:33 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  abstract =     "We introduce a novel user interface and system for
                 exploring extremely detailed 3D models in a museum
                 setting. Three-dimensional models and associated
                 information are presented on a large projection surface
                 controlled by a touch-enabled surface placed at a
                 suitable distance in front of it. Our indirect user
                 interface, dubbed IsoCam, combines an object-aware
                 interactive camera controller with an interactive
                 point-of-interest selector and is implemented within a
                 scalable implementation based on multiresolution
                 structures shared between the rendering and user
                 interaction subsystems. The collision-free camera
                 controller automatically supports the smooth transition
                 from orbiting to proximal navigation, by exploiting a
                 distance-field representation of the 3D object. The
                 point-of-interest selector exploits a specialized view
                 similarity computation to propose a few nearby easily
                 reachable interesting 3D views from a large database,
                 move the camera to the user-selected point of interest,
                 and provide extra information through overlaid
                 annotations of the target view. The capabilities of our
                 approach have been demonstrated in a public event
                 attended by thousands of people, which were offered the
                 possibility to explore submillimetric reconstructions
                 of 38 stone statues of the Mont'e Prama Nuragic
                 complex, depicting larger-than-life human figures, and
                 small models of prehistoric Nuraghe (cone-shaped stone
                 towers). A follow-up of this work, using 2.5m-high
                 projection screens, is now included in permanent
                 exhibitions at two Archeological Museums. Results of a
                 thorough user evaluation, involving quantitative and
                 subjective measurements, are discussed.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "12",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Correia:2014:DIE,
  author =       "N. Correia and T. Rom{\~a}o and A. Ricardo and T. Mota
                 and M. J. Melo and R. Castro and R. Carvalho and A.
                 Miranda",
  title =        "Design of an Interactive Experience with Medieval
                 Illuminations: A Journey into the Beauty and
                 Meaning of Medieval {Portuguese} Manuscripts",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "7",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "13:1--13:??",
  month =        jul,
  year =         "2014",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2626289",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Mon Jul 21 16:23:33 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  abstract =     "This article presents the design, implementation, and
                 evaluation of an interactive installation to explore
                 color in medieval illuminations and their context. The
                 main goal of the installation is to promote wide
                 dissemination of Portuguese medieval illuminations as
                 well as to achieve engagement of the public in the
                 conservation of this treasured heritage. The
                 interactive installation is based on the experience and
                 results obtained in a series of hands-on workshops,
                 where ``real'' colored paints were produced using
                 techniques and pigments similar to the originals. The
                 design and development process of the interactive
                 installation was carried out by a multidisciplinary
                 team in computer engineering, design, illustration, art
                 history, history, chemistry, and conservation science.
                 The installation, after several iterations on the
                 content and technology, explores innovative
                 computational interfaces and how they can be developed
                 and used in cultural heritage. It has three components
                 that work independently or as a full installation: (1)
                 Virtual Scriptorium, (2) Interactive Panel, and (3)
                 Augmented Book. The design rational, implementation,
                 and evaluation of the modular installation are
                 described, as well as how this work contributes to the
                 wide dissemination of information on these
                 extraordinary medieval manuscripts.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "13",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Kim:2014:HGS,
  author =       "Min H. Kim and Holly Rushmeier and John Ffrench and
                 Irma Passeri and David Tidmarsh",
  title =        "{Hyper$3$D}: {$3$D} graphics software for examining
                 cultural artifacts",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "7",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "1:1--1:??",
  month =        feb,
  year =         "2014",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2567652",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Thu Mar 13 11:30:13 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  abstract =     "Art conservators now have access to a wide variety of
                 digital imaging techniques to assist in examining and
                 documenting physical works of art. Commonly used
                 techniques include hyperspectral imaging, 3D scanning,
                 and medical computed tomography imaging. However,
                 viewing most of this digital image data frequently
                 requires both specialized software, which is often
                 associated with a particular type of acquisition
                 device, and professional knowledge of and experience
                 with each type of data. In addition, many of these
                 software packages are focused on particular
                 applications (such as medicine or remote sensing) and
                 do not permit users to access and fully exploit all the
                 information contained in the data. In this paper, we
                 address two practical barriers to using high-tech
                 digital data in art conservation. First, users must
                 deal with a wide variety of interfaces specialized for
                 applications besides conservation. We provide an
                 open-source software tool with a single intuitive
                 interface consistent with conservators' needs that
                 handles various types of 2D and 3D image data and
                 preserves user-generated metadata and annotations.
                 Second, previous software has largely allowed
                 visualizing a single type or only a few types of data.
                 The software we present is designed and structured to
                 accommodate multiple types of digital imaging data,
                 including as yet unspecified or unimplemented formats,
                 in an integrated environment. This allows conservators
                 to access different forms of information and to view a
                 variety of image types simultaneously.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "1",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Vendrell-Vidal:2014:DAP,
  author =       "Eduardo Vendrell-Vidal and Carlos
                 S{\'a}nchez-Belenguer",
  title =        "A Discrete Approach for Pairwise Matching of
                 Archaeological Fragments",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "7",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "15:1--15:??",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2014",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2597178",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Fri Jun 20 17:55:21 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  abstract =     "This article addresses the problem of automatic
                 reconstruction of ancient artifacts from archaeological
                 fragments. The technique described here focuses on
                 pairwise matching of flat fragments (typically fresco
                 fragments), and it is intended to be the core of a
                 larger system for artifact reconstruction. Global
                 registration techniques are challenging due to the
                 combinatory explosion that happens in the solution
                 space: the goal is to find the best alignment among all
                 possible ones without an initialization. This fact
                 defines the duality between performance and correction
                 that we face in this work. The proposed technique
                 defines a cost function to evaluate the quality of an
                 alignment based on a discrete sampling of the fragments
                 that ensures data alignment. Starting from an
                 exhaustive search strategy, the technique progressively
                 incorporates new features that lead to a hierarchical
                 search strategy. Convergence and correction of the
                 resulting technique are ensured using an optimistic
                 cost function. Internal search calculations are
                 optimized so the only operations performed are
                 additions, subtractions, and comparisons over aligned
                 data. All heavy geometric operations are carried out by
                 the GPU on a preprocessing stage that only happens once
                 per fragment.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "15",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Holowko:2014:CBA,
  author =       "Elwira Holowko and Jerzy Wojsz and Robert Sitnik and
                 Maciej Karaszewski",
  title =        "Color-Based Algorithm for Automatic Merging of
                 Multiview {$3$D} Point Clouds",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "7",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "16:1--16:??",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2014",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2558306",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Fri Jun 20 17:55:21 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  abstract =     "In this article, a method of merging point clouds
                 using the modified Harris corner detection algorithm
                 for extracting interest points of textured 3D point
                 clouds is proposed. A new descriptor characterizing
                 point features for identifying corresponding points in
                 datasets is presented. The merging process is based on
                 the Random Sample Consensus (RANSAC) algorithm, which
                 enables calculation of the geometric transformation
                 between point clouds based on a set of interest points
                 that includes incorrect samples, called outliers. The
                 proposed processing path is designed to integrate many
                 directional measurements, which are acquired with a 3D
                 scanner and are represented as unsorted point clouds
                 (x, y, z) with color information (R, G, B). Exemplary
                 measurements shown in this article represent sections
                 of ceiling in the King's Chinese Cabinet of the Museum
                 of King Jan III's Palace at Wilanow in Warsaw, Poland,
                 as well as some more complex objects. Experimental
                 verification confirms the effectiveness of the proposed
                 method in integrating directional measurements of
                 objects with detailed texture, particularly if they
                 have no unique geometric features.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "16",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Trevino:2014:ANP,
  author =       "Jeffrey Trevi{\~n}o and Craig Sapp",
  title =        "Automated Notation of Piano Recordings for Historic
                 Performance Practice Study",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "7",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "17:1--17:??",
  month =        aug,
  year =         "2014",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2597179",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Fri Aug 8 11:12:50 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  abstract =     "We describe a system that automatically notates a
                 comparative visualization of multiple recorded
                 performances of the same musical work. Written musical
                 scores have transmitted basic performance information
                 to musicians over the ages; however, these scores only
                 provide skeletal instructions that must be fleshed out
                 in performance, as musical notation describes phrasing,
                 articulation, dynamics, accentuation, and other
                 ornamentations in generalized and ambiguous forms.
                 Consequently, musical performances derived from the
                 same notation can vary widely from each other in the
                 same manner that a written text may be spoken with
                 intense emotion or in flat monotone. Prior to the
                 advent of recording technology, musical performances
                 were ephemeral, only occurring once, never to be heard
                 again in exactly the same rendition. As a result,
                 musical interpretations were informed only by live
                 listening. Now, with more than a century of recorded
                 performance practice, musicians can delve deeper into
                 the history of their aural art to gain inspiration and
                 insight from sources that would otherwise have been
                 inaccessible. Performers have become interested in
                 giving performances inspired by recordings of the past,
                 which often obey a musical common sense alien to the
                 standards of modern practice, and it is useful for
                 historically informed performers to describe, analyze,
                 emulate, and internalize the performance styles of the
                 past through the detailed study of recordings. Although
                 much can be learned by listening, a visual interface
                 may reveal potentially inaudible details of a
                 recording. Because performers interact daily with
                 traditional musical notation-a sophisticated, if
                 ambiguous, multidimensional visualization of musical
                 information-one approach to the design of such an
                 interface leverages performers' existing knowledge by
                 reducing the gap between data visualization and
                 traditional musical notation as much as possible. Using
                 Abjad, a Python-based tool for musical composition, the
                 symbols of conventional staff notation are augmented to
                 illustrate the intensity and temporal proximity of
                 performed musical events graphically, thus facilitating
                 the comparison of individual performances and the study
                 of changes in performance aesthetics over time.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "17",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Wang:2014:ITC,
  author =       "Xuan Wang and Eng Tat Khoo and Ryohei Nakatsu and
                 Adrian Cheok",
  title =        "Interacting with Traditional {Chinese} Culture through
                 Natural Language",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "7",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "18:1--18:??",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "2014",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2597183",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Fri Jun 20 17:55:21 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  abstract =     "Intangible cultural heritage represents the cultural
                 identities and diversity of mankind, and should be
                 preserved and passed on to the current and future
                 generations. However, in digital cultural heritage
                 research, intangible cultural heritage has been
                 relatively less studied, and the focus has been placed
                 on creating tools and applications for professionals
                 rather than for the general public. In this paper, we
                 present our research effort on creating an interactive
                 system for conveying traditional Chinese culture
                 through natural language conversation. We propose a
                 systematic method for the domain experts to construct,
                 with minimal effort, the knowledge base from a set of
                 unstructured philosophy texts, and we design an
                 algorithm to build a conversational agent emulating the
                 conversation ability of a famous Chinese philosopher.
                 We also report two evaluation studies on the prototype
                 we developed, showing encouraging results on the
                 feasibility and benefits of our approach. By automating
                 part of the answer-finding task using natural language
                 processing and information retrieval technology, the
                 system is able to find answers dynamically, without the
                 need to manually author large amounts of question and
                 answer pairs. Our proposed method could potentially be
                 used to create other conversational agents for
                 educating and promoting cultural values to the general
                 public in a natural and appealing way.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "18",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Cacciari:2015:DMC,
  author =       "I. Cacciari and P. Nieri and S. Siano",
  title =        "{$3$D} Digital Microscopy for Characterizing
                 Punchworks on Medieval Panel Paintings",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "7",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "19:1--19:??",
  month =        feb,
  year =         "2015",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2594443",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Wed Feb 11 13:42:37 MST 2015",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  abstract =     "This article is devoted to a novel application of the
                 micro-3D modeling based on shape from focus. A 3D
                 portable digital microscope prototype has been used for
                 the first time in order to analyze gold punchwork on
                 medieval panel paintings. In general, the 3D domain
                 provides a more flexible and complete characterization
                 of these decorative elements than traditional
                 photographic documentation. Low-magnification 3D
                 digital microscopy is well suited for analyzing
                 morphologies, depths, and profiles of different punch
                 marks. Here, we used these parameters for interpreting
                 the punching process and recognizing sliding and
                 bouncing effects. The 3D reconstruction of the surface
                 engraved also allowed identifying types of anomalies
                 that could be useful as possible authentication
                 markers. The advantages of the present approach with
                 respect to the photographic documentation are of
                 general valence and can be exploited in order to
                 document, parameterize, and interpret a variety of
                 engraving works on panel paintings and metal
                 artifacts.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "19",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Chevrier:2015:SPM,
  author =       "Christine Chevrier",
  title =        "Semiautomatic Parametric Modelling of the Buildings on
                 Town Scale Models",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "7",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "20:1--20:??",
  month =        feb,
  year =         "2015",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2622609",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Wed Feb 11 13:42:37 MST 2015",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  abstract =     "This article presents the semiautomatic parametric
                 method we have conceived and developed for the 3D
                 modelling of town parts of physical town scale models.
                 On one hand, most photogrammetric and lasergrammetric
                 methods do not use parametric models to assist the 3D
                 modelling. On the other hand, architectural parametric
                 models do not use automatic photogrammetric and
                 lasergrammetric methods to position and dimension the
                 parametric models. This article brings both techniques
                 together to provide an entirely automatic system for
                 the 3D modelling of the buildings of physical scale
                 models. In a previous experience, our method was not
                 completely automatic and not parametric. This led to a
                 time-consuming process and some difficulties for the
                 handling and adjustments of the buildings arose. Town
                 scale models realised between the 16th and the 19th
                 centuries are used as an application of our method.
                 These physical models are made out of wood and paper
                 with a scale of around 1:600. From textured meshes
                 obtained from pictures with 123D Catch software, we
                 automatically extract the relevant features. We also
                 identify the type of parametric building before
                 determining the parameters' values to be assigned to
                 the building model. Around 95\% of the scale model's
                 buildings are of the most common types of building and
                 can be easily modelled with parametric components. The
                 remaining are unique and/or complex cases that can be
                 treated as before or described by a specific parametric
                 model added to the library by the user. Indeed, the
                 parametric models are described by the user in a
                 specific part of the software, so that the library is
                 easily extendable by a non--computer science
                 developer.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "20",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Cignoni:2015:VEV,
  author =       "Giovanni A. Cignoni and Fabio Gadducci and Stefano
                 Paci",
  title =        "A Virtual Experience on the Very First {Italian}
                 Computer",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "7",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "21:1--21:??",
  month =        feb,
  year =         "2015",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2629484",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Wed Feb 11 13:42:37 MST 2015",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  abstract =     "Despite their temporal proximity, the technologies of
                 the early computers are far from us. Yet, they are part
                 of the history of science and technology, and they
                 deserve to be studied and popularized. Being machines
                 made to run software programs, they should be exhibited
                 running. Unfortunately, old machines still in working
                 condition are extremely rare. Restoring or rebuilding
                 an old computer is a hard, expensive task: the original
                 components are rare, and the technology is forgotten
                 and sometimes lost. The research needed to
                 re-understand those computers has to adopt experimental
                 archaeology methods: rebuilding old hardware/software
                 requires proceeding by hypotheses and experiments.
                 However, a rebuilt or restored computer is a unique
                 exemplar and a precious specimen: it is not suitable to
                 let people interact with it. A more flexible solution
                 is to use software simulations. First of all,
                 simulation is a valuable tool to carry out the
                 experiments needed to study past technology. Second,
                 the simulators are virtual replicas that let people
                 fully understand the old machines by interacting with
                 them without jeopardizing those precious relics of the
                 past. This article presents the virtual rebuilding of
                 the first computer made in Italy: the Macchina Ridotta
                 (MR) of the University of Pisa. The MR was dismantled
                 after few months of intensive usage to cannibalize the
                 materials for a second computer. As a consequence, the
                 MR disappeared from later chronicles and for many years
                 was ignored by historians. When we attempted to
                 reconstruct the MR history, we found that the survived
                 documentation was far from complete. Simulation proved
                 to be the key tool to support the experimental approach
                 adopted for understanding the MR technology, rebuilding
                 it, and assessing its achievements. The MR simulator is
                 now used at the Museum of Computing Machinery of Pisa
                 as a mean to truly experience a working session on the
                 MR --- a typical computer from the 1950s. The exhibit
                 and the workshops, by exploiting the accurately
                 reproduced characteristics of the MR, address
                 popularization of computer science from several
                 perspectives: from technological mechanisms to
                 scientific foundations, passing through the
                 representation of computers in popular culture.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "21",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Pio:2015:DNP,
  author =       "Gianvito Pio and Fabio Fumarola and Antonio E. Felle
                 and Donato Malerba and Michelangelo Ceci",
  title =        "Discovering Novelty Patterns from the Ancient
                 {Christian} Inscriptions of {Rome}",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "7",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "22:1--22:??",
  month =        feb,
  year =         "2015",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2629513",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Wed Feb 11 13:42:37 MST 2015",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  abstract =     "Studying Greek and Latin cultural heritage has always
                 been considered essential to the understanding of
                 important aspects of the roots of current European
                 societies. However, only a small fraction of the total
                 production of texts from ancient Greece and Rome has
                 survived up to the present, leaving many gaps in the
                 historiographic records. Epigraphy, which is the study
                 of inscriptions (epigraphs), helps to fill these gaps.
                 In particular, the goal of epigraphy is to clarify the
                 meanings of epigraphs; to classify their uses according
                 to their dating and cultural contexts; and to study
                 aspects of the writing, the writers, and their
                 ``consumers.'' Although several research projects have
                 recently been promoted for digitally storing and
                 retrieving data and metadata about epigraphs, there has
                 actually been no attempt to apply data mining
                 technologies to discover previously unknown cultural
                 aspects. In this context, we propose to exploit the
                 temporal dimension associated with epigraphs (dating)
                 by applying a data mining method for novelty detection.
                 The main goal is to discover relational novelty
                 patterns-that is, patterns expressed as logical clauses
                 describing significant variations (in frequency) over
                 the different epochs, in terms of relevant features
                 such as language, writing style, and material. As a
                 case study, we considered the set of Inscriptiones
                 Christianae Vrbis Romae stored in Epigraphic Database
                 Bari, an epigraphic repository. Some patterns
                 discovered by the data mining method were easily
                 deciphered by experts since they captured relevant
                 cultural changes, whereas others disclosed unexpected
                 variations, which might be used to formulate new
                 questions, thus expanding the research opportunities in
                 the field of epigraphy.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "22",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Pintus:2015:FRF,
  author =       "Ruggero Pintus and Enrico Gobbetti",
  title =        "A Fast and Robust Framework for Semiautomatic and
                 Automatic Registration of Photographs to {$3$D}
                 Geometry",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "7",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "23:1--23:??",
  month =        feb,
  year =         "2015",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2629514",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Wed Feb 11 13:42:37 MST 2015",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  abstract =     "We present a simple, fast, and robust complete
                 framework for 2D/3D registration capable to align in a
                 semiautomatic or completely automatic manner a large
                 set of unordered images to a massive point cloud. Our
                 method converts the hard to solve image-to-geometry
                 registration task in a Structure-from-Motion (SfM) plus
                 a 3D/3D alignment problem. We exploit a SfM framework
                 that, starting just from an unordered image collection,
                 computes an estimate of the camera parameters and a
                 sparse 3D geometry deriving from matched image
                 features. We then coarsely register this model to the
                 given 3D geometry by estimating a global scale and
                 absolute orientation using two solutions: a minimal
                 user intervention or a stochastic global point set
                 registration approach. A specialized sparse bundle
                 adjustment (SBA) step, that exploits the correspondence
                 between the sparse geometry and the fine input 3D
                 model, is then used to refine intrinsic and extrinsic
                 parameters of each camera. Output data is suitable for
                 photo blending frameworks to produce seamless colored
                 models. The effectiveness of the method is demonstrated
                 on a series of synthetic and real-world 2D/3D Cultural
                 Heritage datasets.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "23",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Reunanen:2015:HUC,
  author =       "Markku Reunanen and Lily D{\'\i}az and Tommi
                 Horttana",
  title =        "A Holistic User-Centered Approach to Immersive Digital
                 Cultural Heritage Installations: Case {Vrouw Maria}",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "7",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "24:1--24:??",
  month =        feb,
  year =         "2015",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2637485",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Wed Feb 11 13:42:37 MST 2015",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  abstract =     "This article deals with the design and implementation
                 of an immersive installation where users could
                 gesturally navigate around the wreck of Vrouw Maria, a
                 Dutch merchant ship that sank near the Finnish coast in
                 1771 and was rediscovered in 1999. The installation was
                 built for the Maritime Museum in Kotka, Finland, and is
                 part of the preservation efforts of the wreck, which
                 still remains underwater. In addition to the cultural
                 heritage aspect, the project was an experiment in
                 holistic user-centered design, where several design
                 methods, such as scenarios, role playing and
                 informance, storyboards, and prototyping, were employed
                 throughout the process in order to envision the final
                 product as well as assess their utility in the scope of
                 immersive installations. The approach we have taken and
                 documented here can be used as a starting point for
                 similar projects where archaeological sites are
                 reconstructed virtually and presented, for example, in
                 a museum setting.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "24",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Laycock:2015:UCM,
  author =       "S. D. Laycock and G. D. Bell and N. Corps and D. B.
                 Mortimore and G. Cox and S. May and I. Finkel",
  title =        "Using a Combination of Micro--Computed Tomography,
                 {CAD} and {$3$D} Printing Techniques to Reconstruct
                 Incomplete {19th-Century Cantonese} Chess Pieces",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "7",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "25:1--25:??",
  month =        feb,
  year =         "2015",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2629682",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Wed Feb 11 13:42:37 MST 2015",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  abstract =     "As scanning technologies improve new approaches to
                 digitizing cultural heritage artefacts emerge. The use
                 of micro--computed tomography (micro-CT) presents an
                 interesting approach as it is capable of
                 high-resolution scans of not just the surface of the
                 artifact but also the intricate internal structures and
                 volumes leading to more complete digitization than is
                 possible with traditional surface laser scanning
                 techniques. In this work, we investigate the potential
                 to digitize heritage artifacts using micro-CT and focus
                 on the methods of interacting with the datasets to
                 create digital restorations of broken and incomplete
                 pieces before printing physical replicas using 3D
                 printing technology. We visualize the virtual models
                 with clear identification of the new portions added by
                 a digital artist with reference to existing pieces and
                 archives.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "25",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Addison:2015:E,
  author =       "Alonzo C. Addison and Livio {De Luca} and Sofia
                 Pescarin",
  title =        "Editorial",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "8",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "1:1--1:??",
  month =        feb,
  year =         "2015",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2715265",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Wed Feb 25 17:50:15 MST 2015",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "1e",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Pintus:2015:AAT,
  author =       "Ruggero Pintus and Ying Yang and Holly Rushmeier",
  title =        "{ATHENA}: Automatic Text Height Extraction for the
                 Analysis of Text Lines in Old Handwritten Manuscripts",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "8",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "1:1--1:??",
  month =        feb,
  year =         "2015",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2659020",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Wed Feb 25 17:50:15 MST 2015",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  abstract =     "Massive digital acquisition and preservation of
                 deteriorating historical and artistic documents is of
                 particular importance due to their value and fragile
                 condition. The study and browsing of such digital
                 libraries is invaluable for scholars in the Cultural
                 Heritage field but requires automatic tools for
                 analyzing and indexing these datasets. We present two
                 completely automatic methods requiring no human
                 intervention: text height estimation and text line
                 extraction. Our proposed methods have been evaluated on
                 a huge heterogeneous corpus of illuminated medieval
                 manuscripts of different writing styles and with
                 various problematic attributes, such as holes, spots,
                 ink bleed-through, ornamentation, background noise, and
                 overlapping text lines. Our experimental results
                 demonstrate that these two new methods are efficient
                 and reliable, even when applied to very noisy and
                 damaged old handwritten manuscripts.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "1",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Noll:2015:FAO,
  author =       "Tobias N{\"o}ll and Johannes K{\"o}hler and Gerd Reis
                 and Didier Stricker",
  title =        "Fully Automatic, Omnidirectional Acquisition of
                 Geometry and Appearance in the Context of Cultural
                 Heritage Preservation",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "8",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "2:1--2:??",
  month =        feb,
  year =         "2015",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2629693",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Wed Feb 25 17:50:15 MST 2015",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  abstract =     "Effective documentation and display of ancient objects
                 is an essential task in the field of cultural heritage
                 conservation. Digitization plays an important role in
                 the process of creating, preserving, and accessing
                 objects in digital space. Up to the present day,
                 industrial scanners are used for this task, which focus
                 mainly on the detailed reconstruction of the object's
                 geometry only. However, particularly important for a
                 faithful digital presentation of the object is the
                 appearance information-that is, a description of the
                 used materials and how they interact with incident
                 light. Using the world's first full-spherical scanner,
                 we propose a user-friendly reconstruction process that
                 is specifically tailored to the needs of digitizing and
                 representing cultural heritage artifacts. More
                 precisely, our hardware specifically addresses the
                 problem that invaluable or fragile artifacts may not be
                 turned over during acquisition. Nevertheless, we can
                 digitize the object completely, including its bottom.
                 Further, by integrating appearance information into our
                 digitization, we achieve a far more faithful digital
                 replica with a quality comparable to a real picture of
                 the object. But in contrast to a static picture, our
                 representation allows one to interactively change the
                 viewing and lighting directions freely. In addition,
                 the results are very memory efficient, consuming only
                 several megabytes per scanned object. In cooperation
                 with museums and a private collector, we digitized
                 several cultural heritage artifacts to demonstrate the
                 feasibility of the proposed process.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "2",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Heerlien:2015:NHP,
  author =       "Maarten Heerlien and Joost {Van Leusen} and Stephanie
                 Schn{\"o}rr and Suzanne {De Jong-Kole} and Niels Raes
                 and Kirsten {Van Hulsen}",
  title =        "The Natural History Production Line: an Industrial
                 Approach to the Digitization of Scientific
                 Collections",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "8",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "3:1--3:??",
  month =        feb,
  year =         "2015",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2644822",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Wed Feb 25 17:50:15 MST 2015",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  abstract =     "In 2010, Naturalis Biodiversity Center started one of
                 the largest and most diverse programs for natural
                 history collection digitization to date. From a total
                 collection of 37 million specimens and related objects,
                 7 million relevant objects are to be digitized in a
                 5-year period. This article provides an overview of the
                 program and discusses the chosen industrial production
                 line approach, the applied method for prioritization of
                 collections that are to be digitized, and some
                 preliminary results.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "3",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Bettio:2015:MSE,
  author =       "Fabio Bettio and Ruggero Pintus and Alberto Jaspe
                 Villanueva and Emilio Merella and Fabio Marton and
                 Enrico Gobbetti",
  title =        "{Mont'e Scan}: Effective Shape and Color Digitization
                 of Cluttered {$3$D} Artworks",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "8",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "4:1--4:??",
  month =        feb,
  year =         "2015",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2644823",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Wed Feb 25 17:50:15 MST 2015",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  abstract =     "We propose an approach for improving the digitization
                 of shape and color of 3D artworks in a cluttered
                 environment using 3D laser scanning and flash
                 photography. To separate clutter from acquired
                 material, semiautomated methods are employed to
                 generate masks used to segment the range maps and the
                 color photographs. This approach allows the removal of
                 unwanted 3D and color data prior to the integration of
                 acquired data in a 3D model. Sharp shadows generated by
                 flash acquisition are easily handled by this masking
                 process, and color deviations introduced by the flash
                 light are corrected at the color blending step by
                 taking into account the geometry of the object. The
                 approach has been evaluated in a large-scale
                 acquisition campaign of the Mont'e Prama complex. This
                 site contains an extraordinary collection of stone
                 fragments from the Nuragic era, which depict small
                 models of prehistoric nuraghe (cone-shaped stone
                 towers), as well as larger-than-life archers, warriors,
                 and boxers. The acquisition campaign has covered 37
                 statues mounted on metallic supports. Color and shape
                 were acquired at a resolution of 0.25mm, which resulted
                 in more than 6,200 range maps (about 1.3G valid
                 samples) and 3,817 photographs.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "4",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Leoni:2015:DCS,
  author =       "Chiara Leoni and Marco Callieri and Matteo Dellepiane
                 and Daniel Paul O'donnell and Roberto Rosselli {Del
                 Turco} and Roberto Scopigno",
  title =        "The Dream and the Cross: a {$3$D} Scanning Project to
                 Bring {$3$D} Content in a Digital Edition",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "8",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "5:1--5:??",
  month =        feb,
  year =         "2015",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2686873",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Wed Feb 25 17:50:15 MST 2015",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  abstract =     "The Dream of the Rood is one of the earliest Christian
                 poems in Old English and an example of the genre of
                 dream poetry. While a complete text can be found in the
                 10th-century ``Vercelli Book,'' the poem is
                 considerably older, and its oldest occurrence is carved
                 (in runes) on the 7- to 8th-century Ruthwell Stone
                 Cross. In this article, we present the work done in the
                 framework of the ``Visionary Cross'' project, starting
                 from the digitization of the Ruthwell Cross to the
                 creation of a web-based digital edition of The Dream of
                 the Rood, as it is carved on the Cross. The 3D data has
                 been collected and processed with the explicit aim of
                 creating a multimedia framework able to present the
                 highly detailed digital model acquired with 3D scanning
                 technology, together with the transcription and
                 translation of the runes that can be found on its
                 surface. The textual and spatial information are linked
                 through a system of bidirectional links called Spots,
                 which allow the users to navigate freely over the
                 multimedia content, keeping the 3D and textual data
                 synchronized. The present work discusses the different
                 issues that arose during the work, from digitization
                 and processing to the design of a tool for the
                 integration of three-dimensional content in the context
                 of the presentation on the web platform of
                 heterogeneous multimedia data. We end with the
                 difficulties involved in the creation of an XML
                 encoding that could account for the necessities of the
                 visualization system but remain within the scholarly
                 encoding standards of the relevant disciplinary
                 community.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "5",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{LoBuglio:2015:WDT,
  author =       "David {Lo Buglio} and Vanessa Lardinois and Livio {De
                 Luca}",
  title =        "What Do Thirty-One Columns Say about a ``Theoretical''
                 Thirty-Second?",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "8",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "6:1--6:??",
  month =        feb,
  year =         "2015",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2700425",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Wed Feb 25 17:50:15 MST 2015",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  abstract =     "Over the past three decades, the introduction of
                 digital technologies in the field of architectural
                 documentation has profoundly changed tools and
                 acquisition techniques. Most of the developments
                 concern metrical and colorimetric characteristics of
                 the objects studied. These developments, surrounding
                 the practice of architectural survey, tend to respond
                 primarily to the requirements of completeness. In this
                 context, it seems necessary to assess the impact of
                 these instruments on the cognitive value of
                 architectural representation. With a strong
                 technological presence, the study of the built heritage
                 is facing a problem of ``information overload.''
                 Indeed, this strong technological presence fails to
                 strengthen representation in its role as a vehicle of
                 knowledge. Confronted with the intelligibility deficit,
                 this article proposes an original approach for reading
                 morphological features of an artifact by using a
                 bottom-up approach: the meaning of elements (i.e.,
                 their semantic layouts) come from a statistical
                 analysis of the major shape discontinuities of a
                 collection of instances. The idea is to rely on data
                 accumulation to render apparent high-level semantic
                 structures from the comparative analysis of common
                 low-level geometric features. The principles introduced
                 are illustrated by the study of 31 columns of the
                 cloister of the abbey of Saint-Michel-de-Cuxa. To
                 summarize, the first objective is to understand how
                 digital technologies can help us in the analysis of
                 artistic and technical production of Romanesque
                 columns. The second objective is to automatically
                 identify the common semantic articulations of the
                 entire collection to build a reference model for the
                 future assessment of each artifact.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "6",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Trumpy:2015:ODD,
  author =       "Giorgio Trumpy and Rudolf Gschwind",
  title =        "Optical Detection of Dust and Scratches on
                 Photographic Film",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "8",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "7:1--7:??",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2015",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2597894",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Thu Mar 5 16:26:06 MST 2015",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  abstract =     "Today's information society needs efficient and
                 economic solutions for the digital restoration of the
                 photographic heritage. Different methods have been
                 adopted up to now for the automatic detection of dust
                 and scratches; each method has pros and cons, and a
                 limited field of effectiveness. The use of infrared
                 radiation and the spatiotemporal image analysis are
                 among the most effective methods, although they have
                 their limits. The infrared radiation only works for
                 dye-based material, while the spatiotemporal image
                 analysis is not applicable for still images and is
                 limited due to motion in the scene. The present work
                 defines in detail a set of methods for optical dust and
                 scratches detection applicable on any type of
                 transparent photographic material (silver-based as well
                 as dye-based material, still images as well as moving
                 images). The term ``optical'' refers to the fact that
                 the considered methods seek physical evidence of the
                 presence of foreign bodies or irregularities on the
                 film; this allows avoiding the typical digital
                 artifacts produced by ``nonoptical'' methods, for which
                 certain elements of the scenes are erroneously
                 obliterated because they resemble dust grains or
                 scratches. ``PDD'' (Polarized Dark-field Detection)
                 detects the flaws using an image acquired in a
                 polarized dark-field setup; ``DCD'' (Dual Collimation
                 Detection) takes advantage of the Callier effect to
                 locate the flaws; ``n-MDD'' (Multiple Direction
                 Detection) entails the acquisition of n images in
                 dark-field setups with different directions of
                 illumination, and the extraction of the differences
                 between the images through multivariate analysis. A
                 numerical evaluation of the performances of the MDD
                 method with an eightfold acquisition (8-MDD) is carried
                 out by comparing its flaw detection with the flaw
                 detection provided by commercial software based on
                 spatiotemporal image analysis.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "7",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Ibrahim:2015:FFC,
  author =       "Nazrita Ibrahim and Nazlena Mohamad Ali and Noor
                 Faezah Mohd Yatim",
  title =        "Factors Facilitating Cultural Learning in Virtual
                 Architectural Heritage Environments: End User
                 Perspective",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "8",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "8:1--8:??",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2015",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2660776",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Thu Mar 5 16:26:06 MST 2015",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  abstract =     "Besides being a medium for exhibiting
                 three-dimensional heritage objects, the design and
                 development of virtual heritage environments could also
                 facilitate cultural learning. The aim of this article
                 is to present some consideration on factors that could
                 facilitate cultural learning in virtual heritage
                 environment. Cultural learning in the context of this
                 study refers to the acquisition of knowledge that
                 encourages cultural awareness and appreciation. In this
                 study, we explore virtual heritage environment design
                 features, and cultural information characteristics and
                 presentation formats that are important to facilitate
                 cultural learning, from the casual user's perspective.
                 We conducted experiments that required users to explore
                 virtual heritage environments (focusing on
                 architectural heritage) from selected heritage-related
                 websites, followed by interview sessions. Four
                 contributing factors were identified: information
                 design, information presentation, navigation mechanism,
                 and environment setting. The results suggest the need
                 to reduce users' cognitive load when exploring virtual
                 heritage environments while simultaneously presenting
                 information that adds value to their understanding. The
                 results also suggest that the inclusion of cultural
                 information in virtual heritage environments is
                 essential for cultural learning to take place.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "8",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Okura:2015:MRW,
  author =       "Fumio Okura and Masayuki Kanbara and Naokazu Yokoya",
  title =        "Mixed-Reality World Exploration Using Image-Based
                 Rendering",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "8",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "9:1--9:??",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2015",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2700428",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Thu Mar 5 16:26:06 MST 2015",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  abstract =     "This article describes a Mixed-Reality (MR)
                 application that superimposes lost buildings of a
                 historical site onto real scenes virtualized using
                 spherical aerial images. The proposed application is
                 set at a UNESCO World Heritage site in Japan, and is
                 based on a novel framework that supports the
                 photorealistic superimposition of virtual objects onto
                 virtualized real scenes. The proposed framework
                 utilizes Image-Based Rendering (IBR), which enables
                 users to freely change their viewpoint in a real-world
                 virtualization constructed using precaptured images.
                 This framework combines the offline rendering of
                 virtual objects and IBR to take advantage of the higher
                 quality of offline rendering without the additional
                 computational cost of online processing; that is, it
                 incurs only the cost of online lightweight IBR, which
                 is simplified through the pregeneration of structured
                 viewpoints (e.g., at grid points).",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "9",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Katsouri:2015:VAH,
  author =       "Irene Katsouri and Aimilia Tzanavari and Kyriakos
                 Herakleous and Charalambos Poullis",
  title =        "Visualizing and Assessing Hypotheses for Marine
                 Archaeology in a {VR CAVE} Environment",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "8",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "10:1--10:??",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2015",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2665072",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Thu Mar 5 16:26:06 MST 2015",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  abstract =     "The understanding and reconstruction of a wrecks
                 formation process can be a complicated procedure that
                 needs to take into account many interrelated
                 components. The team of the University of Cyprus
                 investigating the 4th-century BC Mazotos shipwreck are
                 unable to interact easily and intuitively with the
                 recorded data, a fact that impedes visualization and
                 reconstruction and subsequently delays the evaluation
                 of their hypotheses. An immersive 3D visualization
                 application that utilizes a VR CAVE was developed, with
                 the intent to enable researchers to mine the wealth of
                 information this ancient shipwreck has to offer.
                 Through the implementation and evaluation of the
                 proposed application, this research seeks to
                 investigate whether such an environment can aid the
                 interpretation and analysis process and ultimately
                 serve as an additional scientific tool for underwater
                 archaeology.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "10",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}

@Article{Brownlow:2015:OAC,
  author =       "Richard Brownlow and Stefano Capuzzi and Sven Helmer
                 and Luciana Martins and Immanuel Normann and Alex
                 Poulovassilis",
  title =        "An Ontological Approach to Creating an {Andean}
                 Weaving Knowledge Base",
  journal =      j-JOCCH,
  volume =       "8",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "11:1--11:??",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "2015",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2700427",
  ISSN =         "1556-4673 (print), 1556-4711 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "1556-4673",
  bibdate =      "Thu Mar 5 16:26:06 MST 2015",
  bibsource =    "http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/jocch/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/jocch.bib",
  abstract =     "Andean textiles are products of one of the richest,
                 oldest and continuous weaving traditions in the world.
                 Understanding the knowledge and practice of textile
                 production as a form of cultural heritage is
                 particularly relevant in the Andean context due to
                 erosion of clothing traditions, reuse of traditional
                 textiles on commodities targeted at the tourism market,
                 and loss of knowledge embedded in textile production.
                 ``Weaving Communities of Practice'' was a pilot project
                 that aimed to create a knowledge base of Andean weaving
                 designed to contribute to curatorial practice and
                 heritage policy. The research team gathered data on the
                 chain of activities, instruments, resources, peoples,
                 places and knowledge involved in the production of
                 textiles, relating to over 700 textile samples. A major
                 part of the project has been the modelling and
                 representation of the knowledge of domain experts and
                 information about the textile objects themselves in the
                 form of an OWL ontology, and the development of a suite
                 of search facilities to be supported by the ontology.
                 This paper describes the research challenges faced in
                 developing the ontology and search facilities, the
                 methodology adopted, the design and implementation of
                 the system, and the design and outcomes of a user
                 evaluation of the system undertaken with a group of
                 domain experts.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "11",
  fjournal =     "Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (JOCCH)",
  journal-URL =  "http://portal.acm.org/browse_dl.cfm?idx=J1157",
}