%%% -*-BibTeX-*-
%%% ====================================================================
%%%  BibTeX-file{
%%%     author          = "Nelson H. F. Beebe",
%%%     version         = "1.03",
%%%     date            = "10 July 2014",
%%%     time            = "18:17:53 MDT",
%%%     filename        = "commundesignqreview.bib",
%%%     address         = "University of Utah
%%%                        Department of Mathematics, 110 LCB
%%%                        155 S 1400 E RM 233
%%%                        Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0090
%%%                        USA",
%%%     telephone       = "+1 801 581 5254",
%%%     FAX             = "+1 801 581 4148",
%%%     URL             = "http://www.math.utah.edu/~beebe",
%%%     checksum        = "36416 2244 11467 112941",
%%%     email           = "beebe at math.utah.edu, beebe at acm.org,
%%%                        beebe at computer.org (Internet)",
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%%%     keywords        = "bibliography; BibTeX; Communication Design
%%%                       Quarterly Review",
%%%     license         = "public domain",
%%%     supported       = "yes",
%%%     docstring       = "This is a COMPLETE bibliography of the
%%%                        journal Communication Design Quarterly
%%%                        Review (CODEN none, ISSN 2166-1200 (print),
%%%                        2166-1642 (electronic)), published by the
%%%                        ACM.  Publication began with volume 1,
%%%                        number 1, in September 2012.
%%%
%%%                        The journal has a World Wide Web site at
%%%
%%%                            http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351
%%%                            http://www.sigdoc.org/publications/cdqr.html
%%%
%%%                        At version 1.03, the COMPLETE year coverage
%%%                        looked like this:
%%%
%%%                             2012 (   8)    2013 (  35)    2014 (  16)
%%%
%%%                             Article:         59
%%%
%%%                             Total entries:   59
%%%
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%%%                        checksum as the first value, followed by the
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%%% ====================================================================

@Preamble{
    "\hyphenation{ }" #
    "\ifx \undefined \booktitle \def \booktitle#1{{{\em #1}}} \fi"
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%%% ====================================================================
%%% Acknowledgement abbreviations:

@String{ack-nhfb = "Nelson H. F. Beebe,
                    University of Utah,
                    Department of Mathematics, 110 LCB,
                    155 S 1400 E RM 233,
                    Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0090, USA,
                    Tel: +1 801 581 5254,
                    FAX: +1 801 581 4148,
                    e-mail: \path|beebe@math.utah.edu|,
                            \path|beebe@acm.org|,
                            \path|beebe@computer.org| (Internet),
                    URL: \path|http://www.math.utah.edu/~beebe/|"}

%%% ====================================================================
%%% Journal abbreviations:

@String{j-COMMUN-DESIGN-Q-REVIEW = "Communication Design Quarterly Review"}

%%% ====================================================================
%%% Publishers and their addresses:

@String{pub-ACM                 = "ACM Press"}
@String{pub-ACM:adr             = "New York, NY 10036, USA"}

%%% ====================================================================
%%% Bibliography entries, sorted in publication order with ``bibsort
%%% -byvolume'':

@Article{Potts:2012:DDC,
  author =       "Liza Potts and Michael Albers",
  title =        "Defining the design of communication",
  journal =      j-COMMUN-DESIGN-Q-REVIEW,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "3--7",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2012",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2448917.2448918",
  ISSN =         "2166-1200 (print), 2166-1642 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2166-1200",
  bibdate =      "Thu Sep 5 18:09:03 MDT 2013",
  bibsource =    "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/commundesignqreview.bib",
  abstract =     "Welcome to your newly redesigned SIGDOC newsletter.
                 Nearly a year ago, we began having conversations about
                 publishing opportunities for cutting-edge (and often
                 bleeding-edge) research in our field. The kind of work
                 that includes pilot studies, exploratory research
                 happening inside labs, centers, and in the field. The
                 kind of work that has trouble getting recognition and
                 funding because it is new, does not have years of
                 research behind it, and is often risky to take on.
                 Cutting-edge work is also the kind of research and
                 application work that needs to find a publishing venue
                 as quickly as possible to encourage further
                 exploration, discussion, and refinement. Other relevant
                 work would be surprising and interesting results of a
                 usability test or development project. Although this
                 work may not be as bleeding edge (and may not even
                 qualify as a ``full research project,'') the knowledge
                 the project team gained can help other groups and needs
                 a venue on which that communication can occur.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "Communication Design Quarterly Review",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351",
}

@Article{Spinuzzi:2012:WCD,
  author =       "Clay Spinuzzi",
  title =        "What is communication design?",
  journal =      j-COMMUN-DESIGN-Q-REVIEW,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "8--11",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2012",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2448917.2448919",
  ISSN =         "2166-1200 (print), 2166-1642 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2166-1200",
  bibdate =      "Thu Sep 5 18:09:03 MDT 2013",
  bibsource =    "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/commundesignqreview.bib",
  abstract =     "In 1997, I worked with a team to conduct my first
                 qualitative research project, a study of how software
                 developers used code libraries when developing a common
                 codebase (McLellan et al. 1998; Spinuzzi 2001). In
                 particular, I was interested in how developers used
                 inline comments to understand their own and others'
                 code. At two sites, the developers used comments pretty
                 much as you might expect: as notes for interpreting and
                 communicating information about the code. But at the
                 third site, developers essentially ignored the
                 comments. One compared the comments to an approaching
                 car's blinker: it might or might not indicate intent,
                 but you'd be foolish to trust it. Another set his
                 editor to gray out comments so they wouldn't distract
                 him. A third used comments --- not to interpret the
                 code, but as landmarks for navigating it. ``If I have
                 50 lines of code without a comment,'' he told me, ``I
                 get lost. It takes me a while to actually read the code
                 and find out what it's doing. But if I have comments I
                 can separate it into sections, and if I know it's the
                 second section in the function, I can go right to
                 it.''",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "Communication Design Quarterly Review",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351",
}

@Article{Swarts:2012:CD,
  author =       "Jason Swarts",
  title =        "Communication design",
  journal =      j-COMMUN-DESIGN-Q-REVIEW,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "12--15",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2012",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2448917.2448920",
  ISSN =         "2166-1200 (print), 2166-1642 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2166-1200",
  bibdate =      "Thu Sep 5 18:09:03 MDT 2013",
  bibsource =    "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/commundesignqreview.bib",
  abstract =     "What is communication design? The term may represent,
                 along with technical communication, information design,
                 and content development, the latest permutation of how
                 the work once known as technical writing has been
                 re-named and re-professionalized. This is a reductive
                 answer, of course, since the terms emphasize different
                 qualities of that work and all are pinchy and baggy as
                 generic descriptors. A different answer is that the
                 term communication design captures an awareness that
                 our field lacks a center. It has its genres and its
                 processes, but as Johnson-Eilola and Selber (in press)
                 argue, it is the focus on defining and solving problems
                 in novel ways and in response to the exigencies of
                 highly varied situations that underscores the
                 importance of what we do. I prefer to see communication
                 design as an embrace of that role, a recognition that
                 the scope of our concern is broad: it is communication.
                 It is also constructive work, aimed at producing
                 concrete effects in the world. It is not just writing;
                 it is design.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "Communication Design Quarterly Review",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351",
}

@Article{Hart-Davidson:2012:VCA,
  author =       "William Hart-Davidson and Jeff Grabill",
  title =        "The value of computing, ambient data, ubiquitous
                 connectivity for changing the work of communication
                 designers",
  journal =      j-COMMUN-DESIGN-Q-REVIEW,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "16--22",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2012",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2448917.2448921",
  ISSN =         "2166-1200 (print), 2166-1642 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2166-1200",
  bibdate =      "Thu Sep 5 18:09:03 MDT 2013",
  bibsource =    "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/commundesignqreview.bib",
  abstract =     "Our experiences as part of the Writing in Digital
                 Environments (WIDE) Research Center have led to a
                 complete break with the notion that we are concerned
                 with the effective communication of idea to an audience
                 or even with the related idea that we design
                 technologies for that purpose. At least this is the
                 stance that we take in this very short essay.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "Communication Design Quarterly Review",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351",
}

@Article{Hayhoe:2012:TFI,
  author =       "George F. Hayhoe",
  title =        "Telling the future of information design",
  journal =      j-COMMUN-DESIGN-Q-REVIEW,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "23--26",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2012",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2448917.2448922",
  ISSN =         "2166-1200 (print), 2166-1642 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2166-1200",
  bibdate =      "Thu Sep 5 18:09:03 MDT 2013",
  bibsource =    "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/commundesignqreview.bib",
  abstract =     "Ask 10 technical communicators to define information
                 design, and you're likely to get as many very different
                 answers (Redish, 2000). Despite the variety, however, I
                 think that most definitions of information design
                 correspond more or less to one of the following
                 approaches.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "Communication Design Quarterly Review",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351",
}

@Article{McNely:2012:BDS,
  author =       "Brian McNely",
  title =        "Big data, situated people: humane approaches to
                 communication design",
  journal =      j-COMMUN-DESIGN-Q-REVIEW,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "27--30",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2012",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2448917.2448923",
  ISSN =         "2166-1200 (print), 2166-1642 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2166-1200",
  bibdate =      "Thu Sep 5 18:09:03 MDT 2013",
  bibsource =    "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/commundesignqreview.bib",
  abstract =     "In his 2005 book Ambient Findability, Peter Morville
                 argued that what we find changes who we become. In 2012
                 and beyond---in an information environment of filter
                 bubbles, contextual advertising, and friend-of-friend
                 chains that push ordinary folks well beyond the Dunbar
                 number---perhaps Morville is in need of some updating:
                 what finds us changes who we become.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "Communication Design Quarterly Review",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351",
}

@Article{Pierce:2012:DC,
  author =       "Robert Pierce",
  title =        "Design of communication",
  journal =      j-COMMUN-DESIGN-Q-REVIEW,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "31--36",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2012",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2448917.2448924",
  ISSN =         "2166-1200 (print), 2166-1642 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2166-1200",
  bibdate =      "Thu Sep 5 18:09:03 MDT 2013",
  bibsource =    "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/commundesignqreview.bib",
  abstract =     "There is much discussion and debate about what exactly
                 falls within the bounds of what is termed, ``design of
                 communication.''",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "Communication Design Quarterly Review",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351",
}

@Article{Salvo:2012:VRB,
  author =       "Michael J. Salvo",
  title =        "Visual rhetoric and big data: design of future
                 communication",
  journal =      j-COMMUN-DESIGN-Q-REVIEW,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "37--40",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "2012",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2448917.2448925",
  ISSN =         "2166-1200 (print), 2166-1642 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2166-1200",
  bibdate =      "Thu Sep 5 18:09:03 MDT 2013",
  bibsource =    "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/commundesignqreview.bib",
  abstract =     "The hype machine---media, corporate communications,
                 and futurist prognosticators---are hard at work
                 promoting Big Data. There are computing and storage
                 resources that, like the ``dark fiber'' installed at
                 the turn of the millennium that now carries streaming
                 video, are looking for huge data sets that require the
                 powerful processing and tremendous storage capacity of
                 the new infrastructure. And there is no better
                 confluence than that provided by the impetus to
                 rearticulate Communication Design Quarterly in an age
                 of Big Data. The New York Times has been running
                 articles about Big Data for some time: ``Big data is
                 all about exploration without preconceived notions.''",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "Communication Design Quarterly Review",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351",
}

@Article{Potts:2013:NGD,
  author =       "Liza Potts and Michael Albers",
  title =        "The next generation on design of communication",
  journal =      j-COMMUN-DESIGN-Q-REVIEW,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "3--4",
  month =        jan,
  year =         "2013",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2448926.2448927",
  ISSN =         "2166-1200 (print), 2166-1642 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2166-1200",
  bibdate =      "Thu Sep 5 18:09:08 MDT 2013",
  bibsource =    "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/commundesignqreview.bib",
  abstract =     "Supporting the next generation of design of
                 communication scholars is a core mission for
                 Communication Design Quarterly. Beginning with this
                 issue, we hope to highlight the exciting research that
                 our younger generations are contributing to the
                 field.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "Communication Design Quarterly Review",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351",
}

@Article{Koh:2013:CAL,
  author =       "Jeffrey Tzu Kwan Valino Koh and Kening Zhu and Kasun
                 Karunanayaka and Doros Polydorou and Roshan Lalintha
                 Peiris and Ryohei Nakatsu",
  title =        "Characterizing the analog-like and digital-like
                 attributes of interactive systems",
  journal =      j-COMMUN-DESIGN-Q-REVIEW,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "8--36",
  month =        jan,
  year =         "2013",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2448926.2448928",
  ISSN =         "2166-1200 (print), 2166-1642 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2166-1200",
  bibdate =      "Thu Sep 5 18:09:08 MDT 2013",
  bibsource =    "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/commundesignqreview.bib",
  abstract =     "In this paper we analyze the works of the Keio-NUS
                 CUTE Center at the National University of Singapore in
                 order to uncover the dispositions of ``analogness'' and
                 ``digitalness'' in regards to the relationship between
                 users and interfaces. By comparing concepts of
                 embodiment from a philosophical perspective, paired
                 with the computer science treatment of analog and
                 digital data, we derive a contingent definition for
                 analog-like and digital-like interaction. With case
                 studies as reference, we outline a continuum to
                 describe types of interfaces based on these
                 dispositions, which could then be further analyzed
                 using characteristics for designing analog-like,
                 digital-like or hybrid-like interactive systems. We
                 then propose a new methodology for designing novel
                 interactive systems that are analog in nature, called
                 interactive analog media (IAM) and finally describe a
                 prototype system called Linetic, which exemplifies some
                 of the characteristics described in this paper.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "Communication Design Quarterly Review",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351",
}

@Article{Lindsley:2013:PID,
  author =       "Tom Lindsley",
  title =        "Prefab interface development and the problem of ease",
  journal =      j-COMMUN-DESIGN-Q-REVIEW,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "37--49",
  month =        jan,
  year =         "2013",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2448926.2448929",
  ISSN =         "2166-1200 (print), 2166-1642 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2166-1200",
  bibdate =      "Thu Sep 5 18:09:08 MDT 2013",
  bibsource =    "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/commundesignqreview.bib",
  abstract =     "To elaborate on a recent tweet by Dan Cederholm of the
                 development studio, SimpleBits, and author of the
                 standards-focused Bulletproof Web Design, current web
                 development practice, with its many device, format, and
                 user contingencies, is creating an ever-expanding and
                 increasingly complex geography for novice web writers
                 and developers to navigate and learn. For a novice to
                 output the ceremonial ``Hello world'' in 2013 is to
                 greet a world of web writing barely comparable to the
                 inline-styled, table-formatted, and JavaScript-leery
                 World Wide Web which many veteran developers first
                 learned.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "Communication Design Quarterly Review",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351",
}

@Article{Harrison:2013:SYT,
  author =       "Angela Harrison",
  title =        "{I} see you're talking {{\#HPV}}: communication
                 patterns in the {{\#HPV}} stream on {Twitter}",
  journal =      j-COMMUN-DESIGN-Q-REVIEW,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "50--51",
  month =        jan,
  year =         "2013",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2448926.2448930",
  ISSN =         "2166-1200 (print), 2166-1642 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2166-1200",
  bibdate =      "Thu Sep 5 18:09:08 MDT 2013",
  bibsource =    "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/commundesignqreview.bib",
  abstract =     "This poster reports data from a pilot study of
                 communication practices in the microblogging site
                 Twitter. A content analysis was conducted on a random
                 sample of 50 tweets from the \#hpv (human
                 papillomavirus) stream in order to determine any
                 recurring practices such as use of links, retweets,
                 uses of the @ symbol, and other phenomena. The pilot
                 study found that, unlike studies conducted on
                 communication patterns in Twitter streams, the
                 participants in the \#hpv stream use it to primarily
                 broadcast information as opposed to interacting and
                 conversing with one another, and collaboration, while
                 present indirectly, is minimal. The researcher plans to
                 expand the sample set to 900 tweets and continue the
                 process of content analysis in order to determine more
                 solid findings for practices of communication in this
                 space. The researcher also plans to examine other
                 spaces relevant to the exchange of information on HPV,
                 conduct content analyses for them, and compare them to
                 the findings on Twitter. The goal is to use these
                 findings for both health and technical communication so
                 that better systems can be designed to optimize the
                 power of participant generated information spaces.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "Communication Design Quarterly Review",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351",
}

@Article{Potts:2013:SAE,
  author =       "Liza Potts",
  title =        "{SIGDOC} at {ATTW}: editorial",
  journal =      j-COMMUN-DESIGN-Q-REVIEW,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "3--4",
  month =        apr,
  year =         "2013",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2466489.2466490",
  ISSN =         "2166-1200 (print), 2166-1642 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2166-1200",
  bibdate =      "Thu Sep 5 18:09:12 MDT 2013",
  bibsource =    "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/commundesignqreview.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "Communication Design Quarterly Review",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351",
}

@Article{Pierce:2013:NC,
  author =       "Rob Pierce",
  title =        "Notes from the chair",
  journal =      j-COMMUN-DESIGN-Q-REVIEW,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "5--8",
  month =        apr,
  year =         "2013",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2466489.2466491",
  ISSN =         "2166-1200 (print), 2166-1642 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2166-1200",
  bibdate =      "Thu Sep 5 18:09:12 MDT 2013",
  bibsource =    "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/commundesignqreview.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "Communication Design Quarterly Review",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351",
}

@Article{Albers:2013:IPS,
  author =       "Michael J. Albers",
  title =        "Introduction: {Proceedings} of {Symposium} on
                 {Communicating Complex Information}",
  journal =      j-COMMUN-DESIGN-Q-REVIEW,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "9--11",
  month =        apr,
  year =         "2013",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2466489.2466492",
  ISSN =         "2166-1200 (print), 2166-1642 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2166-1200",
  bibdate =      "Thu Sep 5 18:09:12 MDT 2013",
  bibsource =    "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/commundesignqreview.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "Communication Design Quarterly Review",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351",
}

@Article{Hailey:2013:RWP,
  author =       "David E. {Hailey, Jr.}",
  title =        "{ReaderCentric} writing for the prosumer marketplace:
                 proposing a new, content-based information architecture
                 model",
  journal =      j-COMMUN-DESIGN-Q-REVIEW,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "12--17",
  month =        apr,
  year =         "2013",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2466489.2466493",
  ISSN =         "2166-1200 (print), 2166-1642 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2166-1200",
  bibdate =      "Thu Sep 5 18:09:12 MDT 2013",
  bibsource =    "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/commundesignqreview.bib",
  abstract =     "As usability experts describe the appropriate models
                 for writing in digital, they consistently express the
                 need to write in a user-centric format. While I agree
                 with the importance of efficient navigation in Web
                 content, I suggest that user-centric writing only
                 applies to part of the content we find in a website.
                 Other styles of writing are almost always required. Two
                 additional styles are persuasion-centric and
                 quality-centric writing. These two styles are required
                 by almost all marketing writing and especially
                 marketing writing for the prosumer community. In this
                 article I extend the ideas found in user centered
                 design to include user-centric, persuasion-centric, and
                 quality-centric writing (which combination I call
                 ReaderCentric writing ). I believe this impacts
                 information architecture in a number of important ways,
                 perhaps most notably in the way the various writing
                 styles impact the mindset of the information architect.
                 I will explain why these writing models are important
                 and demonstrate what happens when the models are
                 ignored or not understood, plus how they may be
                 successfully applied to marketing documents on the
                 Internet. Finally, I will speculate on how information
                 architecture may be adjusted to meet the needs of the
                 content, writer, and reader.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "Communication Design Quarterly Review",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351",
}

@Article{Zobel:2013:ECU,
  author =       "Gregory Zobel",
  title =        "Engaging complexity in usability through assemblage",
  journal =      j-COMMUN-DESIGN-Q-REVIEW,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "18--22",
  month =        apr,
  year =         "2013",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2466489.2466494",
  ISSN =         "2166-1200 (print), 2166-1642 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2166-1200",
  bibdate =      "Thu Sep 5 18:09:12 MDT 2013",
  bibsource =    "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/commundesignqreview.bib",
  abstract =     "In 2011, I faced a complex research problem: how could
                 mobile device user experience (HCMVX) of visitors to
                 Humboldt County, California, be measured and improved?
                 Mobile visitors are visitors who actively use their
                 smart mobile devices, like smart phones and iPads but
                 not laptops, while on vacation. In 2011, there were no
                 official records or policies regarding mobile visitors
                 and little local awareness of mobile tourism in
                 Humboldt County. No one had measured mobile visitors'
                 experience in Humboldt County and few officials had any
                 idea on how to improve these visitors' experiences.
                 This information and policy gap also meant there was no
                 clear way to contact mobile visitors or arrange for
                 mobile usability tests. I faced a complex system with
                 no clear starting point. Traditional usability methods
                 did not initially help because the majority of
                 usability methods rely on clearly identified users,
                 tasks, or goals. While I planned to use traditional
                 usability methods once the users and usability
                 problem(s) were identified, it was necessary to first
                 locate and identify the users and their tasks and
                 goals. Using Deleuze's assemblage concept, I approached
                 the complex system of HCMVX, identified potential
                 points of engagement, conducted field research and
                 interviews, analyzed, and wrote up my results in less
                 than six months. Local officials took my results and
                 reshaped part of their policies and merchant training
                 based on my data and conclusion. Deleuze's assemblage
                 offers usability practitioners a means to approach
                 complex systems and rapidly identify points of
                 engagement.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "Communication Design Quarterly Review",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351",
}

@Article{Blythe:2013:DSM,
  author =       "Stuart Blythe",
  title =        "Dynamic system models and the construction of
                 complexity",
  journal =      j-COMMUN-DESIGN-Q-REVIEW,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "23--27",
  month =        apr,
  year =         "2013",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2466489.2466495",
  ISSN =         "2166-1200 (print), 2166-1642 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2166-1200",
  bibdate =      "Thu Sep 5 18:09:12 MDT 2013",
  bibsource =    "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/commundesignqreview.bib",
  abstract =     "Humans routinely fail to comprehend complexity and
                 anticipate long-term consequences. Systems dynamicists
                 try to overcome these weaknesses by developing
                 computer-supported models that can account for multiple
                 variables in non-linear relationships. Using programs
                 such as STELLA and Vensim, systems dynamicists create
                 stock-and-flow diagrams, equations, and, ultimately,
                 interfaces that enable others to interact with the
                 model. This paper describes how one such model was
                 developed and speculates on roles that technical
                 communicators might play in future projects.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "Communication Design Quarterly Review",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351",
}

@Article{Shirey:2013:RCC,
  author =       "Jenny Shirey and Ann Charng and Quynh Nguyen",
  title =        "Researching and communicating the complexity of {IT}
                 image management",
  journal =      j-COMMUN-DESIGN-Q-REVIEW,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "28--33",
  month =        apr,
  year =         "2013",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2466489.2466496",
  ISSN =         "2166-1200 (print), 2166-1642 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2166-1200",
  bibdate =      "Thu Sep 5 18:09:12 MDT 2013",
  bibsource =    "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/commundesignqreview.bib",
  abstract =     "Today, the process of image management is extremely
                 time-consuming for IT administrators. Until now, this
                 complicated process has not been extensively explored
                 by design researchers. During a recent research study
                 at Citrix, we interviewed 17 IT professionals. We used
                 a process we call ``adaptive interviewing,'' a flexible
                 methodology that could accommodate the various
                 infrastructures of IT organizations and the diversity
                 of ways that administrators handle image management.
                 While conducting our interviews, we worked with our
                 information designer to create several visualizations
                 of our data. Ultimately, we found that supplementing
                 interviews with information visualizations is a
                 powerful way to explore, understand, and explain the
                 complex system of IT image management.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "Communication Design Quarterly Review",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351",
}

@Article{Meloncon:2013:VCE,
  author =       "Lisa Meloncon",
  title =        "Visual communication in environmental health:
                 methodological questions and compromises",
  journal =      j-COMMUN-DESIGN-Q-REVIEW,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "34--37",
  month =        apr,
  year =         "2013",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2466489.2466497",
  ISSN =         "2166-1200 (print), 2166-1642 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2166-1200",
  bibdate =      "Thu Sep 5 18:09:12 MDT 2013",
  bibsource =    "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/commundesignqreview.bib",
  abstract =     "Disciplinary differences cause multiple problems with
                 trying to create a research study that gauges readers'
                 comprehension of complex scientific information. This
                 paper provides a case study of the some of the issues
                 associated with research methods and methodologies on
                 an on an interdisciplinary team.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "Communication Design Quarterly Review",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351",
}

@Article{Passera:2013:TCL,
  author =       "Stefania Passera and Helena Haapio",
  title =        "Transforming contracts from legal rules to
                 user-centered communication tools: a human-information
                 interaction challenge",
  journal =      j-COMMUN-DESIGN-Q-REVIEW,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "38--45",
  month =        apr,
  year =         "2013",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2466489.2466498",
  ISSN =         "2166-1200 (print), 2166-1642 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2166-1200",
  bibdate =      "Thu Sep 5 18:09:12 MDT 2013",
  bibsource =    "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/commundesignqreview.bib",
  abstract =     "In this paper, we illustrate how merging contract
                 design with information design, especially
                 visualization, can help to transform contracts (and
                 people's perceptions about contracts) from legal rules
                 to communication tools. We argue that improved
                 human-contract interaction can maximize the value of
                 commercial relationships, minimize risk, and prevent
                 workplace frustration. Viewing contracts as boundary
                 objects and changing their design to overcome the
                 current challenges offer unexplored opportunities for
                 both research and practice.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "Communication Design Quarterly Review",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351",
}

@Article{Kain:2013:VCU,
  author =       "Donna Kain and Michelle Covi",
  title =        "Visualizing complexity and uncertainty about climate
                 change and sea level rise",
  journal =      j-COMMUN-DESIGN-Q-REVIEW,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "46--53",
  month =        apr,
  year =         "2013",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2466489.2466499",
  ISSN =         "2166-1200 (print), 2166-1642 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2166-1200",
  bibdate =      "Thu Sep 5 18:09:12 MDT 2013",
  bibsource =    "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/commundesignqreview.bib",
  abstract =     "In this paper, we discuss the use of visual
                 representations to assist people in understanding
                 complex information about sea level rise and climate
                 change. We report on the results of a 2011 study in
                 which we conducted plus-minus document usability
                 evaluations of documents describing the mechanisms and
                 consequences of sea-level rise in coastal areas. The
                 protocol included 40 participant interviews and post
                 interview quizzes. We tested with three documents, one
                 that presented information for the U.S. southeastern
                 coastal region and two that presented information
                 ``localized'' for the two areas in which we conducted
                 the research. Findings indicate that participants had
                 difficulty with information presented in graphs and
                 maps and that, while they indicated preferences for
                 localized information, localized images did not improve
                 understanding of complex information.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "Communication Design Quarterly Review",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351",
}

@Article{Richardson:2013:AU,
  author =       "Kevin H. Richardson",
  title =        "{It}'s not about usability",
  journal =      j-COMMUN-DESIGN-Q-REVIEW,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "54--56",
  month =        apr,
  year =         "2013",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2466489.2466500",
  ISSN =         "2166-1200 (print), 2166-1642 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2166-1200",
  bibdate =      "Thu Sep 5 18:09:12 MDT 2013",
  bibsource =    "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/commundesignqreview.bib",
  abstract =     "Traditional usability firms (or usability groups
                 within large companies) tend to focus on evaluation,
                 and their design process typically ends at the Discover
                 phase. For organizations (or individuals) that tout
                 themselves as ``User Experience'', the goal is to have
                 the research and data dictate design, going so far as
                 to have the research person creating wireframes ---
                 defining screen layout, interaction models and
                 information architecture. After all, isn't a
                 research-based interface what we're after?",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "Communication Design Quarterly Review",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351",
}

@Article{Albers:2013:CCI,
  author =       "Michael J. Albers",
  title =        "Cargo cults in information design",
  journal =      j-COMMUN-DESIGN-Q-REVIEW,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "57--61",
  month =        apr,
  year =         "2013",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2466489.2466501",
  ISSN =         "2166-1200 (print), 2166-1642 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2166-1200",
  bibdate =      "Thu Sep 5 18:09:12 MDT 2013",
  bibsource =    "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/commundesignqreview.bib",
  abstract =     "There are a multitude of rules of writing and design.
                 Cargo cult design occurs when designers rigidly apply a
                 design rule without a clear understanding of why the
                 rule exists or whether it applies to the situation. The
                 rules moved into the status of being a rule for a
                 reason. It is important for designers to understand
                 those reasons so they can critically analyze the
                 situation and make decisions about the applicability of
                 the rule. Successful design requires deeply
                 understanding and working within the situational
                 context and not blindly applying generic rules.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "Communication Design Quarterly Review",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351",
}

@Article{Albers:2013:DCO,
  author =       "Michael J. Albers",
  title =        "Design of communication open research questions:
                 editorial",
  journal =      j-COMMUN-DESIGN-Q-REVIEW,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "3--5",
  month =        aug,
  year =         "2013",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2524248.2524249",
  ISSN =         "2166-1200 (print), 2166-1642 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2166-1200",
  bibdate =      "Thu Sep 5 18:09:16 MDT 2013",
  bibsource =    "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/commundesignqreview.bib",
  abstract =     "This issue considers the question of what are (or
                 should be) the major current research problems that
                 researchers within Design of Communication should be
                 addressing.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "Communication Design Quarterly Review",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351",
}

@Article{Potts:2013:NC,
  author =       "Liza Potts",
  title =        "Notes from the chair",
  journal =      j-COMMUN-DESIGN-Q-REVIEW,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "6--10",
  month =        aug,
  year =         "2013",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2524248.2524250",
  ISSN =         "2166-1200 (print), 2166-1642 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2166-1200",
  bibdate =      "Thu Sep 5 18:09:16 MDT 2013",
  bibsource =    "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/commundesignqreview.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "Communication Design Quarterly Review",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351",
}

@Article{Arduser:2013:PEU,
  author =       "Lora Arduser",
  title =        "Produsers and end users: how social media impacts our
                 students' future research questions",
  journal =      j-COMMUN-DESIGN-Q-REVIEW,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "11--14",
  month =        aug,
  year =         "2013",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2524248.2524251",
  ISSN =         "2166-1200 (print), 2166-1642 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2166-1200",
  bibdate =      "Thu Sep 5 18:09:16 MDT 2013",
  bibsource =    "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/commundesignqreview.bib",
  abstract =     "When I bought my first Mac I was frustrated by the
                 lack of instructional documentation in my shiny new
                 box. I found myself regularly going online to look for
                 help in the form of PDFs or videos. A company
                 professionally produced these instructional ``texts''.
                 Enter the webcam, the iPhone, and a host of websites to
                 upload user-generated content, and we increasingly see
                 end users becoming produsers, individuals whom produce
                 as well as consume information.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "Communication Design Quarterly Review",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351",
}

@Article{Longo:2013:PRT,
  author =       "Bernadette Longo and Nancy Coppola and Norbert Elliot
                 and Andrew Klobucar and Carol Johnson",
  title =        "A program of research for technical communication:
                 adaptive learning",
  journal =      j-COMMUN-DESIGN-Q-REVIEW,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "15--17",
  month =        aug,
  year =         "2013",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2524248.2524252",
  ISSN =         "2166-1200 (print), 2166-1642 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2166-1200",
  bibdate =      "Thu Sep 5 18:09:16 MDT 2013",
  bibsource =    "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/commundesignqreview.bib",
  abstract =     "Distinct from prose essays as cultural expression, we
                 use technical communication for functional purposes,
                 addressing questions of how people learn as we craft
                 our communications. Aristotle set out psychological
                 principles of how people learn --- or are persuaded to
                 change their minds --- when he laid down his
                 foundational advice for rhetors to cultivate ``the
                 faculty of observing in any given case the available
                 means of persuasion on almost any subject presented to
                 us.'' Building on this foundational principle,
                 technical communicators since World War II have studied
                 how to achieve persuasion (or change) by making
                 information accessible, formatting documents, writing
                 at designated reading levels, and setting out
                 instruction steps clearly. Recently, we have also
                 become interested in how, through the concept of
                 rhetoric, oral and written language acquires poignant
                 social, ethical and technical dimensions, situating
                 Aristotle's ``faculties'' of persuasion within specific
                 cultural and political contexts.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "Communication Design Quarterly Review",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351",
}

@Article{Pflugfelder:2013:BDB,
  author =       "Ehren Helmut Pflugfelder",
  title =        "Big data, big questions",
  journal =      j-COMMUN-DESIGN-Q-REVIEW,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "18--21",
  month =        aug,
  year =         "2013",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2524248.2524253",
  ISSN =         "2166-1200 (print), 2166-1642 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2166-1200",
  bibdate =      "Thu Sep 5 18:09:16 MDT 2013",
  bibsource =    "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/commundesignqreview.bib",
  abstract =     "One significant concern I have for the future of
                 technical communication, a concern I often share with
                 my students, involves the impact of ``big data.''
                 Though the term is frequently used with a sneer, or at
                 least a slightly unsettled laugh, the methods for
                 retrieving information from large data sets are
                 improving as I write this. One significant question the
                 field faces is: ``what new relationships will develop
                 and what new work will technical communicators be
                 responsible for in emergent big data projects, in
                 coming years?''",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "Communication Design Quarterly Review",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351",
}

@Article{Jones:2013:RDB,
  author =       "Dave Jones",
  title =        "From research to design: building knowledge so that we
                 can build experiences",
  journal =      j-COMMUN-DESIGN-Q-REVIEW,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "22--25",
  month =        aug,
  year =         "2013",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2524248.2524254",
  ISSN =         "2166-1200 (print), 2166-1642 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2166-1200",
  bibdate =      "Thu Sep 5 18:09:16 MDT 2013",
  bibsource =    "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/commundesignqreview.bib",
  abstract =     "As a scholarly researcher and architect working in
                 industry, the most critical questions facing
                 communication designers tackle complex ecosystems of
                 people, technologies, and culturally situated
                 practices. The field of Technical Communication is
                 uniquely equipped to tackle these challenges
                 (Hart-Davidson, 2001). Carolyn Rude (2009) states that
                 scholars in the field of Technical Communication must
                 explore how ``texts (print, digital, multimedia,
                 visual, verbal) and relative communication practices
                 mediate knowledge, values, and action in a variety of
                 social and professional contexts'' (p. 176). She argues
                 that research within the field must be situated at the
                 intersection of creative practices that produce
                 different types of texts, the cultures that provide
                 meaningful context to such activities, and the
                 technologies that support the production of both texts
                 and meaning. But, where does Rude's call to action
                 point Technical Communication as a field, now? What new
                 research questions have emerged at the intersection
                 that she describes?",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "Communication Design Quarterly Review",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351",
}

@Article{Kalmbach:2013:IWN,
  author =       "James Kalmbach",
  title =        "The invisible web and the need for new research
                 methodologies",
  journal =      j-COMMUN-DESIGN-Q-REVIEW,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "26--28",
  month =        aug,
  year =         "2013",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2524248.2524255",
  ISSN =         "2166-1200 (print), 2166-1642 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2166-1200",
  bibdate =      "Thu Sep 5 18:09:16 MDT 2013",
  bibsource =    "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/commundesignqreview.bib",
  abstract =     "A research question that I believe will be important
                 for technical communication practitioners and scholars
                 in the next decade is as follows: How do we do develop
                 big data methods for locating and studying web-based
                 technical communication artifacts?",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "Communication Design Quarterly Review",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351",
}

@Article{Davis:2013:ICP,
  author =       "Marjorie T. Davis",
  title =        "Identifying core principles and expectations",
  journal =      j-COMMUN-DESIGN-Q-REVIEW,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "29--30",
  month =        aug,
  year =         "2013",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2524248.2524256",
  ISSN =         "2166-1200 (print), 2166-1642 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2166-1200",
  bibdate =      "Thu Sep 5 18:09:16 MDT 2013",
  bibsource =    "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/commundesignqreview.bib",
  abstract =     "I'd like to add my brief response to your discussion
                 about research questions facing our discipline. I can
                 immediately name two.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "Communication Design Quarterly Review",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351",
}

@Article{Walton:2013:NIC,
  author =       "Rebecca Walton and Natasha N. Jones",
  title =        "Navigating increasingly cross-cultural,
                 cross-disciplinary, and cross-organizational contexts
                 to support social justice",
  journal =      j-COMMUN-DESIGN-Q-REVIEW,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "31--35",
  month =        aug,
  year =         "2013",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2524248.2524257",
  ISSN =         "2166-1200 (print), 2166-1642 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2166-1200",
  bibdate =      "Thu Sep 5 18:09:16 MDT 2013",
  bibsource =    "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/commundesignqreview.bib",
  abstract =     "We believe that one of the major research questions
                 that will drive the field of technical communication
                 during the next 5--10 years is, ``How can technical
                 communication scholars navigate increasingly
                 cross-cultural, cross-disciplinary, and
                 cross-organizational contexts to support social justice
                 through better communication?''",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "Communication Design Quarterly Review",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351",
}

@Article{Welhausen:2013:CMG,
  author =       "Candice A. Welhausen",
  title =        "Chickens, {MRIs}, and graphics: creating visual
                 information in scientific fields",
  journal =      j-COMMUN-DESIGN-Q-REVIEW,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "36--39",
  month =        aug,
  year =         "2013",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2524248.2524258",
  ISSN =         "2166-1200 (print), 2166-1642 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2166-1200",
  bibdate =      "Thu Sep 5 18:09:16 MDT 2013",
  bibsource =    "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/commundesignqreview.bib",
  abstract =     "Last semester I gave a talk to a small group of
                 graduate students and faculty in the Department of
                 Animal and Food Sciences in the College of Agriculture
                 on my campus. As one of several invited speakers for
                 the department's graduate seminar series, the purpose,
                 I was told, was straightforward: model an effective
                 presentation for the students. I teach courses in
                 technical and professional communication so I imagined
                 it might also be useful to discuss presentation
                 strategies. I concluded by giving an overview of my own
                 research interests---broadly, visual
                 communication---and briefly described a project I am
                 working on related to scientific graphics and historic
                 public health maps.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "Communication Design Quarterly Review",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351",
}

@Article{Abel:2013:WMT,
  author =       "Scott Abel",
  title =        "Writing for machine translation",
  journal =      j-COMMUN-DESIGN-Q-REVIEW,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "40--41",
  month =        aug,
  year =         "2013",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2524248.2524259",
  ISSN =         "2166-1200 (print), 2166-1642 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2166-1200",
  bibdate =      "Thu Sep 5 18:09:16 MDT 2013",
  bibsource =    "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/commundesignqreview.bib",
  abstract =     "Computer-assisted translation (aka machine
                 translation) is on the fast track to becoming a
                 utility. Translation will automatically become part of
                 everything we do. Computers, websites, touch screen
                 devices, in-car navigation systems, kiosks in public
                 places, ATMs, airline self-service terminals ---
                 basically any consumer-facing graphic user interface
                 --- will include a ``translate'' button. In fact, the
                 beta version of the Android operating system includes
                 just that in the latest rendition of the Chrome
                 browser. That's just the start of things to come.
                 Machine translation will soon be ubiquitous!",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "Communication Design Quarterly Review",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351",
}

@Article{Andersen:2013:ORQ,
  author =       "Rebekka Andersen and Sid Benavente and Dave Clark and
                 William Hart-Davidson and Carolyn Rude and JoAnn
                 Hackos",
  title =        "Open research questions for academics and industry
                 professionals: results of a survey",
  journal =      j-COMMUN-DESIGN-Q-REVIEW,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "42--49",
  month =        aug,
  year =         "2013",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2524248.2524260",
  ISSN =         "2166-1200 (print), 2166-1642 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2166-1200",
  bibdate =      "Thu Sep 5 18:09:16 MDT 2013",
  bibsource =    "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/commundesignqreview.bib",
  abstract =     "To identify some of the research questions and needs
                 of most importance to industry professionals and
                 academics, we conducted a Technical Communication
                 Industry Research Survey that posed a common set of
                 questions about research. Here we report the results,
                 which suggest some differing priorities for academics
                 and industry professionals, but also some shared
                 priorities that might help guide disciplinary research,
                 including content strategy, user behavior,
                 metrics/measurements, and process/practices.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "Communication Design Quarterly Review",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351",
}

@Article{Oswal:2013:EAP,
  author =       "Sushil K. Oswal",
  title =        "Exploring accessibility as a potential area of
                 research for technical communication: a modest
                 proposal",
  journal =      j-COMMUN-DESIGN-Q-REVIEW,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "50--60",
  month =        aug,
  year =         "2013",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2524248.2524261",
  ISSN =         "2166-1200 (print), 2166-1642 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2166-1200",
  bibdate =      "Thu Sep 5 18:09:16 MDT 2013",
  bibsource =    "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/commundesignqreview.bib",
  abstract =     "This position paper proposes the undertaking of a
                 systematic research agenda on the tangled questions of
                 accessibility, technology, and disability from the
                 perspective of Technical Communication field. O'Hara
                 (2004), Oswal and Hewett (2013), Palmeri (2006), Porter
                 (1997), Ray and Ray (1999), Salvo (2005), Slatin and
                 Rush (2003), Theofanos and Redish (2003 and 2005), and
                 Walters (2010), have approached accessibility issues in
                 various Technical Communication contexts and have
                 emphasized the need for more attention to accessibility
                 in our research, teaching, and practice. Likewise, the
                 major journals in our field-- Technical Communication,
                 Technical Communication Quarterly and the IEEE
                 Transactions in Professional Communication ---have also
                 published at least one special issue EACH on the topic
                 of accessibility. While all this sporadic research has
                 appeared on accessibility-related topics in different
                 venues, this research has not yet gained the type of
                 traction one would generally expect from an area with
                 such a growth potential. As a user-centered discipline,
                 we also ought to remember that presently 57.8 million
                 Americans have one or more disabilities. Among the U.S.
                 veteran population alone, 5.5 million are disabled.
                 And, if we consider the reach of our Technical
                 Communication work via the World Wide Web, this planet
                 has 1 billion people with disabilities who can be
                 affected by our accessibility research (National Center
                 for Disability, 2013).",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "Communication Design Quarterly Review",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351",
}

@Article{Keller:2013:TDT,
  author =       "Beth Keller",
  title =        "Tracing digital thyroid culture: poster",
  journal =      j-COMMUN-DESIGN-Q-REVIEW,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "61--61",
  month =        aug,
  year =         "2013",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2524248.2524262",
  ISSN =         "2166-1200 (print), 2166-1642 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2166-1200",
  bibdate =      "Thu Sep 5 18:09:16 MDT 2013",
  bibsource =    "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/commundesignqreview.bib",
  abstract =     "In this poster presentation, the author traces health
                 communication in online spaces, especially
                 conversations about hypothyroidism on Twitter.
                 Specifically, the author looks at how participants on
                 Twitter use the hashtag \#hypothyroidism for patient
                 agency and advocacy. The strength of ties between
                 \#hypothyroidism (the Twitter hashtag) and the actors
                 necessary for its existence is also discussed. This
                 poster presentation argues that Twitter can strengthen
                 patient agency and advocacy in both online and offline
                 relationships between hypothyroidism patients and
                 healthcare professionals. Patient agency and advocacy
                 is accomplished because Twitter helps to build
                 communities of support between and among patients and
                 professionals through the immediacy and accessibility
                 of information.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "Communication Design Quarterly Review",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351",
}

@Article{Editors:2013:IDI,
  author =       "{Editors}",
  title =        "Icon design to improve communication of health
                 information to older adults",
  journal =      j-COMMUN-DESIGN-Q-REVIEW,
  volume =       "2",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "6--32",
  month =        nov,
  year =         "2013",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2559866.2559867",
  ISSN =         "2166-1200 (print), 2166-1642 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2166-1200",
  bibdate =      "Mon Dec 23 10:18:30 MST 2013",
  bibsource =    "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/commundesignqreview.bib",
  abstract =     "This paper describes the studies undertaken in order
                 to improve and simplify communication of health
                 information for a Remote Patient Monitoring (RPM)
                 devices, specifically the BL Healthcare Access Tablet,
                 to older adults. Current icon and information design of
                 the RPM devices are not well designed to reflect the
                 needs, experiences and limitations of the older adults.
                 In addition to this, compliance with self-management
                 schedules is often poor due to complex and unclear
                 instructions and information design. The issue of
                 compliance, with the need for effective communication
                 between chronic disease patients and healthcare
                 professionals emphasize the need for the appropriate
                 information design and communication technology.
                 Communication of health information was improved from
                 the perspective of the user experience (UX) design and
                 information design. For the purpose of addressing the
                 UX redesign, usability studies were conducted, followed
                 by the information redesign and icons design. Although
                 medical peripherals, such as an electronic thermometer,
                 are required to measure the patient information, a
                 mobile or tablet application can easily be used to
                 record, send and view this data. A concept for the RPM
                 mobile application is developed, that could be used on
                 existing tablets and smartphones, thus eliminating the
                 need for the current costly hardware.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "Communication Design Quarterly Review",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351",
}

@Article{Getto:2013:NKS,
  author =       "Guiseppe Getto",
  title =        "Networked knowledges: student collaborative digital
                 composing as communicative action",
  journal =      j-COMMUN-DESIGN-Q-REVIEW,
  volume =       "2",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "33--58",
  month =        nov,
  year =         "2013",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2559866.2559868",
  ISSN =         "2166-1200 (print), 2166-1642 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2166-1200",
  bibdate =      "Mon Dec 23 10:18:30 MST 2013",
  bibsource =    "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/commundesignqreview.bib",
  abstract =     "As Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs)
                 utilized in workplaces, classrooms, and community
                 organizations continue to proliferate, it follows that
                 the kinds of knowledge necessary to assemble those
                 technologies in order to engage in effective
                 professional communication are becoming increasingly
                 complex. This article details a study conducted of two
                 student teams engaged in a service-learning class in
                 which they were tasked with producing high-quality
                 digital products---a mini-documentary and a simple, but
                 interactive website---for client organizations---an art
                 classroom in a local public school and a mentoring
                 initiative within a local non-profit. The main findings
                 of this study are that students mobilized a variety of
                 resources and created a flexible network of
                 technologies, knowledges, people, and modes of
                 communication in order to address issues pertinent to
                 their clients. In addition, I argue that the most
                 important resource students mobilized was knowledge
                 itself, indicating that one of the most important
                 aspects of digital composing may be in-depth, practical
                 knowledge of technologies, modes, and the genres they
                 involve. Ultimately, the implications of this limited,
                 classroom-based case study are that a situated
                 understanding of how to assemble knowledges for the
                 effective design of communication within a given
                 communication infrastructure may be more important than
                 access to the most cutting-edge modes and technologies,
                 especially when working with resource-poor
                 organizational clients.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "Communication Design Quarterly Review",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351",
}

@Article{Aparicio:2013:TWL,
  author =       "Manuela Aparicio",
  title =        "Technical writers @ {Lisbon}",
  journal =      j-COMMUN-DESIGN-Q-REVIEW,
  volume =       "2",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "59--60",
  month =        nov,
  year =         "2013",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2559866.2559870",
  ISSN =         "2166-1200 (print), 2166-1642 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2166-1200",
  bibdate =      "Mon Dec 23 10:18:30 MST 2013",
  bibsource =    "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/commundesignqreview.bib",
  abstract =     "EuroSIGDOC, the SIGDOC European Chapter, has promoted
                 workshops and conferences since 2010 in Europe. These
                 events bring together researchers, academia and
                 industry, focused on information systems, design
                 communication, documentation and open source.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "Communication Design Quarterly Review",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351",
}

@Article{Hennes:2013:BRB,
  author =       "Jack Hennes",
  title =        "Book Review: {{\booktitle{Rhetorical Accessability: At
                 the Intersection of Technical Communication and
                 Disability Studies}}, edited by Lisa Meloncon,
                 Amityville, New York: Baywood, 2013. 247 pp.}",
  journal =      j-COMMUN-DESIGN-Q-REVIEW,
  volume =       "2",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "61--66",
  month =        nov,
  year =         "2013",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2559866.2559872",
  ISSN =         "2166-1200 (print), 2166-1642 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2166-1200",
  bibdate =      "Mon Dec 23 10:18:30 MST 2013",
  bibsource =    "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/commundesignqreview.bib",
  abstract =     "Meloncon's Rhetorical Accessability explores the
                 connections between critical work in disability studies
                 and technical communication. The first collection of
                 its kind, included essays combine theory and practice
                 to emphasize the value of placing disability studies at
                 the forefront of design, workplace practices, and
                 pedagogies. Echoing the diversity of scholarship that
                 has contributed to this emerging area of study---from
                 disability studies, technical communication, rhetoric,
                 and literacy studies--- the collection emphasizes
                 technical communication as a crucial multidisciplinary
                 ground for critical discourse regarding disability and
                 accessibility. As a whole, Meloncon's collection
                 initiates a broader scholarly conversation centered on
                 issues of accessibility in various technical
                 communication contexts.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "Communication Design Quarterly Review",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351",
}

@Article{Franklin:2013:BRB,
  author =       "Nathan Franklin",
  title =        "Book Review: {{\booktitle{The UX book: Process and
                 guidelines for ensuring a quality user experience}} by
                 Rex Hartson and Pardha A. Pyla, San Diego: Morgan
                 Kaufmann. 2012}",
  journal =      j-COMMUN-DESIGN-Q-REVIEW,
  volume =       "2",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "67--72",
  month =        nov,
  year =         "2013",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2559866.2559873",
  ISSN =         "2166-1200 (print), 2166-1642 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2166-1200",
  bibdate =      "Mon Dec 23 10:18:30 MST 2013",
  bibsource =    "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/commundesignqreview.bib",
  abstract =     "Immediately, the Preface and introduction of Rex
                 Hartson and Pardha A. Pyla's (2012) co-authored The UX
                 Book: Process and Guidelines for Ensuring a Quality
                 User Experience, grounds the reader in a specific
                 overview of the practical and pedagogical components of
                 the UX design process. The practical aspect of the text
                 centers on what the authors call the UX lifecycle, a
                 highly structured framework that orchestrates the many
                 different design and evaluative stages of system or
                 product completion. The pedagogical approach of the
                 text is an awareness of audience that translates into a
                 customizable book. Both authors encourage their readers
                 to decide what parts of the text are of interest and to
                 focus on those sections only. Central to the text's
                 overall approach is the refrain ``user experience is
                 more than usability'' (pg. xi). Within this approach,
                 for instance, Hartson and Pyla address some of the
                 ineffective metaphors that cloud or muddle the UX
                 lifecycle process. Previous models often rely on
                 testing, or lab-based metaphors that fail to generate a
                 quality user experience. With the rise of
                 design-oriented techniques today, the development
                 process has been wrested from previously-held beliefs
                 that a system or product can be generated independent
                 of the user's environment.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "Communication Design Quarterly Review",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351",
}

@Article{Swarts:2014:MS,
  author =       "Jason Swarts",
  title =        "The mobile situation",
  journal =      j-COMMUN-DESIGN-Q-REVIEW,
  volume =       "2",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "7--9",
  month =        feb,
  year =         "2014",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2597469.2597470",
  ISSN =         "2166-1200 (print), 2166-1642 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2166-1200",
  bibdate =      "Fri Mar 21 14:46:05 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/commundesignqreview.bib",
  abstract =     "Written communication and its accumulated principles
                 of applied design often serve conservative and
                 preservationist goals. Literacy and its various,
                 sprawling technological apparatuses of production and
                 distribution preserve ideas and prepare them for uptake
                 and adaptation. What is preserved in writing speaks
                 with greater reliability over time and choices about
                 design can influence the validity or appropriateness of
                 those texts, by invoking proper voices and suggesting
                 or demanding appropriate relationships between people
                 and institutions organized around those texts. While
                 this may seem an inhospitable way to open a column in a
                 journal on communication design, my point is not
                 intentionally disparaging. Instead it is to draw a
                 contrast between types of communication design work:
                 that which works to affiliate discourse with a location
                 and practices of uptake and that which creates and
                 works across those locations.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "Communication Design Quarterly Review",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351",
}

@Article{Andersen:2014:TMI,
  author =       "Rebekka Andersen",
  title =        "Toward a more integrated view of technical
                 communication",
  journal =      j-COMMUN-DESIGN-Q-REVIEW,
  volume =       "2",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "10--16",
  month =        feb,
  year =         "2014",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2597469.2597471",
  ISSN =         "2166-1200 (print), 2166-1642 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2166-1200",
  bibdate =      "Fri Mar 21 14:46:05 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/commundesignqreview.bib",
  abstract =     "For the past few years, I have attended a number of
                 industry conferences focused on content management
                 (CM); reviewed a wealth of CM-focused publications,
                 including trade books, white papers, newsletters, and
                 blogs; and followed numerous CM-focused online
                 discussions. Through these experiences and readings I
                 have learned a great deal about the affordances and
                 challenges of CM. But the message that has most
                 impacted my thinking about CM---and what it means for
                 the field of Technical Communication (TC)---is this:
                 the era of document-based information development (ID),
                 which has shaped all aspects of TC research, training,
                 and practice since the field's inception, is coming to
                 an end.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "Communication Design Quarterly Review",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351",
}

@Article{Lauer:2014:TCD,
  author =       "Claire Lauer",
  title =        "Technology and communication design: crossroads and
                 compromises",
  journal =      j-COMMUN-DESIGN-Q-REVIEW,
  volume =       "2",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "17--20",
  month =        feb,
  year =         "2014",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2597469.2597472",
  ISSN =         "2166-1200 (print), 2166-1642 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2166-1200",
  bibdate =      "Fri Mar 21 14:46:05 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/commundesignqreview.bib",
  abstract =     "As I prepare to teach the latest iteration of my
                 course in Visualizing Information, I am struck by how
                 quickly visualization software and techniques are
                 advancing. As an academic, whose primary job is as a
                 researcher and teacher, my relationship with technology
                 is rooted at the crossroads of excitement and dread; of
                 just catching up and being perpetually behind. I feel
                 excitement that advancements in web functionality and
                 design, visualization techniques, and other
                 technology-enabled practices are finally happening and
                 can benefit my work and the work of my students.
                 Conversely I am filled with dread that I rarely feel
                 fully in-the-know, much less at the bleeding edge of
                 these developments because my job doesn't necessarily
                 reward that kind of knowledge. As a graduate student in
                 the fall of 2000 (Is that really 14 years ago?) I
                 earned a webmaster certification and followed that by
                 helping in the redesign of several websites at my
                 university. A decade later, as an assistant professor
                 on the tenure clock, I was composing an academic
                 webtext and I found myself needing the help of an
                 undergraduate student to teach me how to integrate
                 something called jQuery into my HTML5. I was dismayed
                 over how rusty my skills had become once my tenure
                 responsibilities had taken over.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "Communication Design Quarterly Review",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351",
}

@Article{Zhang:2014:BBH,
  author =       "Tao Zhang and Ilana R. Barnes and Marlen Promann",
  title =        "Building better help: user characteristics' effect on
                 library help design",
  journal =      j-COMMUN-DESIGN-Q-REVIEW,
  volume =       "2",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "21--27",
  month =        feb,
  year =         "2014",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2597469.2597473",
  ISSN =         "2166-1200 (print), 2166-1642 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2166-1200",
  bibdate =      "Fri Mar 21 14:46:05 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/commundesignqreview.bib",
  abstract =     "The goal of this study is to examine the effect of
                 user help seeking characteristics on their perception
                 of library help design principles, formats and tools.
                 Structural equation modeling (SEM) of a questionnaire
                 survey results showed a number of significant
                 regression relationships. Analysis of open-ended survey
                 questions revealed existing user behaviors such as
                 preferred help formats and gave insights into the
                 likelihood of using a help system.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "Communication Design Quarterly Review",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351",
}

@Article{Young:2014:RDV,
  author =       "Justin Young and Charlie Potter",
  title =        "Remediation in data visualization: two examples of
                 learning in real-time data processing environments",
  journal =      j-COMMUN-DESIGN-Q-REVIEW,
  volume =       "2",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "29--37",
  month =        feb,
  year =         "2014",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2597469.2597474",
  ISSN =         "2166-1200 (print), 2166-1642 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2166-1200",
  bibdate =      "Fri Mar 21 14:46:05 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/commundesignqreview.bib",
  abstract =     "Our poster is an exploration of the effects of
                 quantifying physical experiences and refashioning them
                 into new, interactive, live experiences through data
                 visualization; the poster explores how data
                 visualizations are designed to teach and effect change.
                 Specifically, the authors explore two topics: athletic
                 training and teacher training. Both of these fields
                 have been inundated by data analysis tactics; sports
                 data visualizations are highly developed and
                 hypermediate while teacher training data are still
                 largely immediate and static Through an analysis of
                 these two topics in relation to theories of
                 phenomenography and remediation, the poster discusses
                 how the use of real-time data analysis and data
                 visualization common in sports training might inform
                 how that we effect change in other fields, such as
                 teaching.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "Communication Design Quarterly Review",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351",
}

@Article{Keller:2014:BRB,
  author =       "Beth Keller",
  title =        "Book Review: {{\booktitle{Social media in disaster
                 response: how experience architects can build for
                 participation}} by L. Potts, (2013). New York, NY:
                 Routledge}",
  journal =      j-COMMUN-DESIGN-Q-REVIEW,
  volume =       "2",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "39--42",
  month =        feb,
  year =         "2014",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2597469.2597476",
  ISSN =         "2166-1200 (print), 2166-1642 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2166-1200",
  bibdate =      "Fri Mar 21 14:46:05 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/commundesignqreview.bib",
  abstract =     "Liza Potts' recent book, \booktitle{Social media in
                 disaster response: How experience architects can build
                 for participation}, explores the ways in which social
                 web tools provide researchers and practitioners with
                 opportunities to address disaster communication and
                 information design for building participatory cultures.
                 All too often, researchers and design practitioners in
                 both the academy and industry think of social web tools
                 as static, as ``single-serving interfaces, systems,
                 documents and silos'' (1). In order to meet the
                 progressive needs of contemporary knowledge workers,
                 interdisciplinary teams that include humanists, social
                 scientists, and technologists must build better
                 architectures for everyday experiences users encounter
                 in social media. Although issues of social media
                 experience and participation may seem of concern to
                 only a small group of information and experience
                 designers---or, ``experience architects,'' as Potts
                 terms them---Potts argues that anyone who cares about
                 writing, communication, social web design, and
                 development should be deeply concerned with these
                 issues, especially as they relate to how information is
                 located and distributed as knowledge across the social
                 web during times of disaster.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "Communication Design Quarterly Review",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351",
}

@Article{Ruszkiewicz:2014:BRB,
  author =       "Sheryl Ruszkiewicz",
  title =        "Book Review: {{\booktitle{Global UX: design and
                 research in a connected world}} by W. Quesenbery and D.
                 Szuc; Waltham, MA: Morgan Kaufmann and \booktitle{A web
                 for everyone: designing accessible user experiences} by
                 S. Horton and W. Quesenbery; Brooklyn, NY: Rosenfeld
                 media}",
  journal =      j-COMMUN-DESIGN-Q-REVIEW,
  volume =       "2",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "43--47",
  month =        feb,
  year =         "2014",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2597469.2597477",
  ISSN =         "2166-1200 (print), 2166-1642 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2166-1200",
  bibdate =      "Fri Mar 21 14:46:05 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/commundesignqreview.bib",
  abstract =     "In \booktitle{Global UX: Design and research in a
                 connected world}, Quesenbery and Szuc present a
                 thoughtful and adaptable guide for the reader's
                 individual needs or projects in relation to UX (user
                 experience), regardless of the reader's experience
                 level. Quesenbery and Szuc gathered material from 65
                 interviews of UX practitioners across the globe, and
                 analyzed over 70 hours of interviews to represent
                 current trends and personal experiences with UX. To
                 highlight different voices and perspectives gathered
                 from the interviews, the authors chose to provide
                 multiple quotations and anecdotal, yet practical,
                 stories to define UX terminology and concepts.
                 Quesenbery and Szuc share many effective strategies for
                 this process, while highlighting, through vignettes
                 from their interviews, some of the difficulties and
                 problem-solving strategies useful when working in UX on
                 a global (or even local) scale. The book is divided
                 into short, easily digestible chapters with
                 infographics that summarize each chapter succinctly.
                 This book provides enough structure to guide novice UX
                 practitioners, while providing innovative anecdotes,
                 tips, and strategies for more seasoned practitioners,
                 as well. In addition, the information gathered from the
                 interviews highlights the passion of those in UX,
                 helping the reader to feel passionate about UX as
                 well.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "Communication Design Quarterly Review",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351",
}

@Article{Salvo:2014:WNE,
  author =       "Michael Salvo",
  title =        "What's in a name?: experience architecture
                 rearticulates the humanities",
  journal =      j-COMMUN-DESIGN-Q-REVIEW,
  volume =       "2",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "6--9",
  month =        may,
  year =         "2014",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2644448.2644450",
  ISSN =         "2166-1200 (print), 2166-1642 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2166-1200",
  bibdate =      "Thu Jul 10 18:15:59 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/commundesignqreview.bib",
  abstract =     "By describing cultural usability work as ``information
                 architecture,'' I knew I would be waging a continuous
                 rearguard battle with database designers. Eventually
                 the cost of bickering over turf outweighed the clarity
                 the term brought, even considering its lineage. Richard
                 Saul Wurman first recognized Information Anxiety in the
                 late 1980s and described those working as Information
                 Architects in the 1990s. Here, I remind readers that
                 Wurman goes by the nickname ``Ted.'' Wurman's vision of
                 widespread attention to Technology, Education, and
                 Design resulting in the popular TED talks---although he
                 has an uneasy relationship with his own creation.
                 ``When he speaks about TED Talks, he clearly struggles
                 to identify with the organisation today and is adamant
                 that it has lost its vision.''
                 [http://www.universityobserver.ie/2012/10/31/interview-richard-saul-wurman-ted-talks/]
                 At our current moment of media convergence, it helps to
                 remember that the 20 minute flipped pedagogical lecture
                 itself is the result of thirty years of dedication to
                 disseminating disruptive ideas. If Ted Wurman can let
                 TED go, I can let go of Information Architecture.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "Communication Design Quarterly Review",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351",
}

@Article{Howard:2014:JMB,
  author =       "Tharon Howard",
  title =        "Journey mapping: a brief overview",
  journal =      j-COMMUN-DESIGN-Q-REVIEW,
  volume =       "2",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "10--13",
  month =        may,
  year =         "2014",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2644448.2644451",
  ISSN =         "2166-1200 (print), 2166-1642 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2166-1200",
  bibdate =      "Thu Jul 10 18:15:59 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/commundesignqreview.bib",
  abstract =     "If you've been in the field of user experience design,
                 usability testing, or marketing for anytime at all,
                 you've almost certainly come across the use of personas
                 to help members of a cross functional design team
                 communicate with one another about the impacts that
                 design decisions will have on a particular user
                 demographic. As Adlin and Pruitt (2006) explain,
                 personas are useful because they put an individual,
                 human face on demographic and ethnographic data which
                 would otherwise be difficult to explain to software
                 engineers, project managers, information product
                 developers, and other stakeholders in a way they can
                 easily conceptualize and apply. Usually on one sheet of
                 paper, a persona will provide a photo of the character
                 for the persona; a memorable name for the persona; a
                 short bio or background information about the persona;
                 the persona's goals for using the product being
                 developed; a short and memorable quote from the persona
                 which usually conveys their ethos; and other
                 information relevant to the use of the product being
                 designed such as training; previous experience with
                 similar products, or physical disabilities (such as
                 arthritis or poor eye sight---see
                 http://www.clemson.edu/caah/caah_mockups/persona_clemsongrad.html
                 for an example of personas developed for the redesign
                 of a College's website).",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "Communication Design Quarterly Review",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351",
}

@Article{Oswal:2014:PDB,
  author =       "Sushil K. Oswal",
  title =        "Participatory design: barriers and possibilities",
  journal =      j-COMMUN-DESIGN-Q-REVIEW,
  volume =       "2",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "14--19",
  month =        may,
  year =         "2014",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2644448.2644452",
  ISSN =         "2166-1200 (print), 2166-1642 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2166-1200",
  bibdate =      "Thu Jul 10 18:15:59 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/commundesignqreview.bib",
  abstract =     "Scholars conducting analytical research in multimodal
                 interaction design have not paid enough attention to
                 the use of disabled participants in their work. In this
                 column I argue that participatory action research with
                 these users is overdue for the sake of building a
                 culture of accessible designs. Working on a larger
                 project on participatory design for a book, this
                 commentary records my initial thoughts on how
                 participation by disabled users needs to be central to
                 the overall production cycle. I begin with the premise
                 that each disabled user participates in this multimodal
                 discourse from an entirely different vantage point
                 shaped by their social, physical, and artistic
                 experiences. It also emphasizes that each user
                 interacts with multimodality differently depending upon
                 the body they have, the adaptive technology they
                 employ, and the uses they have for multimodality.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "Communication Design Quarterly Review",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351",
}

@Article{Shea:2014:CCT,
  author =       "Marybeth Shea and Cameron Mozafari",
  title =        "Communicating complexity in transdisciplinary science
                 teams for policy: applied stasis theory for organizing
                 and assembling collaboration",
  journal =      j-COMMUN-DESIGN-Q-REVIEW,
  volume =       "2",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "20--24",
  month =        may,
  year =         "2014",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2644448.2644453",
  ISSN =         "2166-1200 (print), 2166-1642 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2166-1200",
  bibdate =      "Thu Jul 10 18:15:59 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/commundesignqreview.bib",
  abstract =     "This paper presents an application of stasis theory
                 for the purpose of consulting with interdisciplinary
                 teams of scientists working in the early stages of
                 composing a science policy advisory document. By
                 showing that stasis theory can be used as an organizing
                 conceptual tool, we demonstrate how cooperative and
                 organized question-asking practices calm complex
                 interdisciplinary scientific disputations in order to
                 propel productive science policy work. We believe that
                 the conceptual structure of stasis theory motivates
                 scientists to shift their viewpoints from solitary
                 expert specialists toward that of allied policy guides
                 for their advisory document's reader. We further argue
                 that, through the use of stasis theory, technical
                 writers can aid interdisciplinary scientists in policy
                 writing processes, thus fostering transdisciplinary
                 collaboration.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "Communication Design Quarterly Review",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351",
}

@Article{Zhou:2014:UCW,
  author =       "Quan Zhou",
  title =        "{``That usability course''}: what technical
                 communication programs get wrong about usability and
                 how to fix it",
  journal =      j-COMMUN-DESIGN-Q-REVIEW,
  volume =       "2",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "25--27",
  month =        may,
  year =         "2014",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2644448.2644454",
  ISSN =         "2166-1200 (print), 2166-1642 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2166-1200",
  bibdate =      "Thu Jul 10 18:15:59 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/commundesignqreview.bib",
  abstract =     "The approach to usability adopted by many technical
                 communication programs often conceptually separates
                 usability from other subject matter areas and places it
                 at the tail-end of a project. Such an approach creates
                 conceptual barriers with regard to how usability fits
                 in a design project. As a result, students do not
                 engage in the critical work of designing and testing
                 iteratively in the formative phase of a product. We
                 should broaden usability into user experience, enable
                 students to see user experience as an iterative and
                 agile process, and provide in-depth knowledge of user
                 research methods.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "Communication Design Quarterly Review",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351",
}

@Article{Qian:2014:CAE,
  author =       "Zhenyu Cheryl Qian and Yingjie Victor Chen and
                 Yinghuan Patty Peng",
  title =        "A comparative approach to enhance information
                 interaction design of visual analytics systems",
  journal =      j-COMMUN-DESIGN-Q-REVIEW,
  volume =       "2",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "28--33",
  month =        may,
  year =         "2014",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2644448.2644455",
  ISSN =         "2166-1200 (print), 2166-1642 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2166-1200",
  bibdate =      "Thu Jul 10 18:15:59 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/commundesignqreview.bib",
  abstract =     "This paper introduces a novel comparative strategy to
                 access, synthesize, and redesign a mobile visual
                 analytics (VA) system. Designing, evaluating, and
                 improving VA tools are challenging because of the
                 exploratory and unpredicted nature of their users'
                 analysis activities in a real context. Often the system
                 development approach is running rounds of iteration
                 based on one or a few design ideas and related
                 references. Inspired by ideation and design selection
                 from design-thinking literature, we start to redesign
                 systems from comparison and filtering based on a broad
                 range of design ideas. This approach focuses on the
                 information interaction design of systems; integrates
                 design principles from information design, sensorial
                 design, and interaction design as guidelines; compares
                 VA systems at the component level; and seeks unique and
                 adaptive design solutions. The Visual Analytics
                 Benchmark Repository provides a rich collection of the
                 Visual Analytics Science and Technology (VAST)
                 challenges submission reports and videos. For each
                 challenge design problem, there are multiple creative
                 and mature design solutions. Based on this resource, we
                 conducted a series of empirical user studies to
                 understand the user experience by comparing different
                 design solutions, enhanced one visual analytics system
                 design MobileAnalymator by synthesizing new features
                 and removing redundant functions, and accessed the
                 redesign outcomes with the same comparative approach.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "Communication Design Quarterly Review",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351",
}

@Article{Carlson:2014:LCS,
  author =       "Clinton Carlson and Whitney Peake and Jeff Joiner",
  title =        "Letting context speak: the use of co-creative,
                 design-led, and user-centered design methods in the
                 design of complex public communications",
  journal =      j-COMMUN-DESIGN-Q-REVIEW,
  volume =       "2",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "34--39",
  month =        may,
  year =         "2014",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2644448.2644456",
  ISSN =         "2166-1200 (print), 2166-1642 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2166-1200",
  bibdate =      "Thu Jul 10 18:15:59 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/commundesignqreview.bib",
  abstract =     "This paper discusses how co-creative, design-led, and
                 user-centered design methods are being utilized to gain
                 insight into the factors that influence the
                 communication of food recalls. It looks at the role of
                 designer and public in these methods and considers the
                 value of these methods for other settings.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "Communication Design Quarterly Review",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351",
}

@Article{Labriola:2014:RCC,
  author =       "Jack T. Labriola",
  title =        "Review of {{\booktitle{Cross-cultural technology
                 design: creating culture-sensitive technology for local
                 users}} by Sun, H. (2012), New York, NY: Oxford
                 University Press, Inc.}",
  journal =      j-COMMUN-DESIGN-Q-REVIEW,
  volume =       "2",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "40--42",
  month =        may,
  year =         "2014",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2644448.2644458",
  ISSN =         "2166-1200 (print), 2166-1642 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2166-1200",
  bibdate =      "Thu Jul 10 18:15:59 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/commundesignqreview.bib",
  abstract =     "In Huatong Sun's recent book, Cross-cultural
                 technology design: Creating culture-sensitive
                 technology for local users, the author presents a study
                 of text messaging usage in both American and Chinese
                 culture. Sun introduces the field to her ``design
                 philosophy and model of Culturally Localized User
                 Experience'' or ``CLUE'' (xiv-xv). Using the CLUE
                 approach, Sun explores the differences in how a
                 technology such as text messaging has developed, and
                 has been interpreted by users, within each culture,
                 including case studies of specific users. Sun breaks up
                 her book into three distinctive parts: Grounding,
                 Experiences, and Implications.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "Communication Design Quarterly Review",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351",
}

@Article{Amant:2014:RCC,
  author =       "Kirk St. Amant",
  title =        "Review of {{\booktitle{Cross-cultural design for IT
                 products and services}} by Pei-Luen Patrick Rau, Tom
                 Plocher, \& Yee-Yin Choong. (2013), CRC Press}",
  journal =      j-COMMUN-DESIGN-Q-REVIEW,
  volume =       "2",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "43--45",
  month =        may,
  year =         "2014",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2644448.2644459",
  ISSN =         "2166-1200 (print), 2166-1642 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2166-1200",
  bibdate =      "Thu Jul 10 18:15:59 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/commundesignqreview.bib",
  abstract =     "The culture we are part of tells us what aspects of
                 design constitute ``good'' both in terms of aesthetics
                 and usability. When it comes to technologies, these
                 factors must be addressed for a given item to be
                 successfully adopted by and correctly used within a
                 particular culture. To put these ideas into practice,
                 consider the following: A given interface might be very
                 easy for the members of a particular culture to use,
                 but if its aesthetic appeal is so jarring that
                 individuals avoid it almost instinctively (i.e., before
                 they actually use it), then the benefits of that
                 interface are lost. Similarly, an aesthetically
                 appealing interface might entice the members of a given
                 culture to try it, but if the interface is difficult to
                 use, then the initially interested audience is likely
                 to abandon it. Effective communication design for
                 international contexts thus becomes a matter of
                 recognizing and addressing both aspects associated with
                 ``good.'' And as online media increasingly link the
                 world together via information technologies, the need
                 to understand and address such factors becomes
                 increasingly important.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "Communication Design Quarterly Review",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=J1351",
}